3

I am trying to write a functor memoizer to save time on repeated expensive function calls. In my class design I am struggling to find a simple interface.

Using this Functor base class:

template <typename TOut, typename TIn>
class Functor {
public:
    virtual
    ~Functor() {
    }

    virtual
    TOut operator()(TIn input) = 0;
};

I now want to write a class that will encapsulate and memoize a functor. In addition to encapsulating a Functor, the MemoizedFunctor will itself be a Functor. This results in having 3 template parameters.

Here is a working example:

#include <unordered_map>

template <typename F, typename TOut, typename TIn>
class MemoizedFunctor : public Functor<TOut, TIn> {
public:
    MemoizedFunctor(F f) : f_(f) {
    }

    virtual
    ~MemoizedFunctor() {
    }

    virtual
    TOut operator()(TIn input) override {
        if (cache_.count(input)) {
            return cache_.at(input);
        } else {
            TOut output = f_(input);
            cache_.insert({input, output});
            return output;
        }
    }

private:
    F f_;
    std::unordered_map<TIn, TOut> cache_;
};

class YEqualsX : public Functor<double, double> {
public:
    virtual
    ~YEqualsX() {
    }

    double operator()(double x) override {
        return x;
    }
};

int main() {
    MemoizedFunctor<YEqualsX, double, double> f((YEqualsX())); // MVP

    f(0); // First call
    f(0); // Cached call

    return 0;
}

I feel like there MUST be a way to eliminate having to specify all 3 template parameters. Given the function passed to the constructor of MemoizedFunctor, I would argue that all three template parameters could be deduced.

I am not sure how to rewrite the class so that using it would not require all the template specification.

I tried using a smart pointer to a Functor as the member variable in MemoizedFunctor. This eliminates the first template parameter, but now the user of the class must pass a smart pointer to the MemoizedFunctor class.

In summary, I would like to have all the template arguments of MemoizedFunctor be automatically be deduced on construction. I believe this is possible because on construction all template arguments are unambiguous.

  • 1
    You're flipping the in/out parameters - can you pick a consistent ordering? – Barry May 23 at 19:17
  • @Barry Whoops sorry about that, hopefully it's fixed now. Mistake made when transposing from one machine to this machine. – Pavis11 May 23 at 19:18
4

In summary, I would like to have all the template arguments of MemoizedFunctor be automatically be deduced on construction. I believe this is possible because on construction all template arguments are unambiguous.

If I understand correctly, the first template type for MemoizedFunctor is ever a Functor<TOut, TIn>, or something that inherit from some Functior<TOut, TIn>, where TOut and TIn are second and third template parameter for MemoizedFunctor.

It seems to me that you're looking for a deduction guide.

To deduce the second and third template parameter, I propose to declare (no definition is required because are used only inside decltype()) the following couple of functions

template <typename TOut, typename TIn>
constexpr TIn getIn (Functor<TOut, TIn> const &);

template <typename TOut, typename TIn>
constexpr TOut getOut (Functor<TOut, TIn> const &);

Now, using decltype() and std::declval(), the user defined deduction guide simply become

template <typename F>
MemoizedFunctor(F)
   -> MemoizedFunctor<F,
                      decltype(getOut(std::declval<F>())),
                      decltype(getIn(std::declval<F>()))>;

The following is a full compiling example

#include <unordered_map>

template <typename TOut, typename Tin>
class Functor
 {
   public:
    virtual ~Functor ()
     { }

    virtual TOut operator() (Tin input) = 0;
 };

template <typename TOut, typename TIn>
constexpr TIn getIn (Functor<TOut, TIn> const &);

template <typename TOut, typename TIn>
constexpr TOut getOut (Functor<TOut, TIn> const &);

template <typename F, typename TOut, typename TIn>
class MemoizedFunctor : public Functor<TOut, TIn>
 {
   public:
      MemoizedFunctor(F f) : f_{f}
       { }

      virtual ~MemoizedFunctor ()
       { }

      virtual TOut operator() (TIn input) override
       {
         if ( cache_.count(input) )
            return cache_.at(input);
         else
          {
            TOut output = f_(input);
            cache_.insert({input, output});
            return output;
          }
       }

   private:
      F f_;
      std::unordered_map<TIn, TOut> cache_;
 };

class YEqualsX : public Functor<double, double>
 {
   public:
      virtual ~YEqualsX ()
       { }

      double operator() (double x) override
       { return x; }
 };

template <typename F>
MemoizedFunctor(F)
   -> MemoizedFunctor<F,
                      decltype(getOut(std::declval<F>())),
                      decltype(getIn(std::declval<F>()))>;

int main ()
 {
   MemoizedFunctor f{YEqualsX{}};

   f(0); // First call
   f(0); // Cached call
 }

-- EDIT --

Aschepler, in a comment, observed that there is a possible drawback in this solution: some types can't be returned from a function.

By example, a function can't return a C-style array.

This ins't a problem deducing TOut (the type returned by operator()) exactly because is a type returned by a method so is returnable also by getOut().

But this can be (generally speaking) a problem for TIn: if TIn is, by example, int[4] (can't be, in this case, because is used as a key for an unordered map but, I repeat, generally speaking), a int[4] can't returned by getIn().

You can go around this problem (1) adding a type wrapper struct as follows

template <typename T>
struct typeWrapper
 { using type = T; };

(2) modifying getIn() to return the wrapper TIn

template <typename TOut, typename TIn>
constexpr typeWrapper<TIn> getIn (Functor<TOut, TIn> const &);

and (3) modifying the deduction guide to extract TIn from the wrapper

template <typename F>
MemoizedFunctor(F)
   -> MemoizedFunctor<F,
                      decltype(getOut(std::declval<F>())),
                      typename decltype(getIn(std::declval<F>()))::type>;
  • Thank you very much for your answer! This looks to accomplish exactly what I was hoping for. I will take a closer look at it tomorrow to try to understand it all. – Pavis11 May 23 at 20:19
  • 2
    One drawback about this function declaration method in general is that some C++ types (raw arrays, abstract classes, function types) can never be a function return type. Not really an issue for this example, since Functor<TOut, TIn>::operator() already used them as a return type and parameter type. – aschepler May 23 at 21:25
  • 1
    @aschepler - good point; surely not an issue for TOut, because is the returned type for operator() so is returnable; but maybe is an issue for TIn: if TIn is (by example) int[4], operator() can receive it but getIn() can't return it. Uhmmm... maybe I'll add a caveat. – max66 May 23 at 23:34
  • 1
    @aschepler - Thinking a little about the problem, there is a simple solution: return the TIn type, from getIn(), wrapped in a struct. Thanks for pointing the problem. – max66 May 24 at 0:05
  • 1
    @Pavis11 - aschepler has pointed a possible problem in my solution; answer modified to go around it (but give a look also at the Barry solution: if you can add a couple of using aliases in the Functor base classes, all become a lot simpler). – max66 May 24 at 0:08
4

In:

template <typename F, typename TOut, typename TIn>
class MemoizedFunctor : public Functor<TOut, TIn> { ... }

If F must be an implementation of Functor (which I'm guessing is the case?), you can add a few aliases to Functor to make your life easier (these can be done externally instead of internally, but it seems reasonable to make this intrusive):

template <typename TOut, typename TIn>
class Functor {
public:
    using in_param = TIn;
    using out_param = TOut;
    // ... rest as before ...
};

And then change MemoizedFunctor to use those aliases directly. You don't really have independent template parameters, they're completely dependent right?

template <typename F>
class MemoizedFunctor : public Functor<typename F::out_param, typename F::in_param> { ... }

With that change (and likewise change your interal use of TOut and TIn), this works as desired (since, of course, we only have one template parameter now so there's only one to provide):

MemoizedFunctor<YEqualsX> f(YEqualsX{});

And that parameter can be deduced through CTAD directly without any further changes

MemoizedFunctor f(YEqualsX{});
  • Your assumption that F must also be an implementation of Functor is correct. I was thinking a solution similar to this must exist since as you said I don't really have 3 independent template parameters. I actually tried this solution without the aliases (class MemoizedFunctor : public Functor<typename F::TOut, typename F::TIn>), but of course this didn't work. I knew this syntax was funky and it looks like these aliases are the solution. – Pavis11 Jun 6 at 16:42

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