2

I'm dealing with a function and a subfunction, the subfunction being called within the function. Both have a __try .. __except-clause, and I'd like to see the general exception handling in case of the function, and the specific one in case of the subfunction, in other words:

int function(){
__try{
  do_something();
  return subfunction();
  } __except (Exception_Execute_Handler_Something()){
  show("general exception");
  }

int subfunction(){
  __try{
    return do_something_else();
  } __except (Exception_Execute_Handler_Something_Else()){
    show("specific case");
  }

In this case:
When do_something() goes wrong, I see "general exception".
When do_something_else() goes wrong, I also see "general exception", which is not what I want.

What I want is:
When do_something() goes wrong, I want to see "general exception.
When do_something_else() goes wrong, I want to see "specific case".

Edit after Ben Voight's remark

There indeed is an exception filter, and this is currently checking the exception code for deciding whether or not to continue, as you can see here:

if (Exception->ExceptionCode == STATUS_ACCESS_VIOLATION)
  return EXCEPTION_CONTINUE_SEARCH;

I have, however, no knowledge at all in the structure and/or content of ExceptionRecord and ContextRecord, the two input parameters of the exception handling. Hereby I give an example of what those parameters look like in my particular case:

Exception record:

-   ExceptionRecord 0x0eecdec8 {ExceptionCode=3221225620 ExceptionFlags=0 ExceptionRecord=0x00000000 <NULL> ...}    _EXCEPTION_RECORD *
    ExceptionCode   3221225620  unsigned long // I guess this means division by zero
    ExceptionFlags  0   unsigned long
+   ExceptionRecord 0x00000000 <NULL>   _EXCEPTION_RECORD *
    ExceptionAddress    0x002c1993 {<Application>.exe!CClass::Main_Method(CInputClass & params), Line 46}   void *
    NumberParameters    0   unsigned long
+   ExceptionInformation    0x0eecdedc {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}    unsigned long[15]

ContextRecord:

-   ContextRecord   0x0eecdf18 {ContextFlags=65543 Dr0=0 Dr1=0 ...} _CONTEXT *
    ContextFlags    65543   unsigned long
    Dr0 0   unsigned long
    Dr1 0   unsigned long
    Dr2 0   unsigned long
    Dr3 0   unsigned long
    Dr6 0   unsigned long
    Dr7 0   unsigned long
-   FloatSave   {ControlWord=0 StatusWord=0 TagWord=0 ...}  _FLOATING_SAVE_AREA
    ControlWord 0   unsigned long
    StatusWord  0   unsigned long
    TagWord 0   unsigned long
    ErrorOffset 0   unsigned long
    ErrorSelector   0   unsigned long
    DataOffset  0   unsigned long
    DataSelector    0   unsigned long
+   RegisterArea    0x0eecdf50 ""   unsigned char[80] // all are zero
    Spare0  0   unsigned long
    SegGs   43  unsigned long
    SegFs   83  unsigned long
    SegEs   43  unsigned long
    SegDs   43  unsigned long
    Edi 80923496    unsigned long
    Esi 250405956   unsigned long
    Ebx 0   unsigned long
    Edx 0   unsigned long
    Ecx 0   unsigned long
    Eax 1   unsigned long
    Ebp 250405884   unsigned long
    Eip 2890131 unsigned long
    SegCs   35  unsigned long
    EFlags  66118   unsigned long
    Esp 250405880   unsigned long
    SegSs   43  unsigned long
+   ExtendedRegisters   0x0eecdfe4 "\x2 \x1"    unsigned char[512] // at first sight, not readable

Now my question has turned into:

In case I'm already inside another __try..__except clause, I'd return EXCEPTION_CONTINUE_SEARCH.

Does anybody know which of the mentioned ExceptionRecord or ContextRecord properties I can use for determining whether or not I am already inside another __try..__except clause?

New edit after again some more information

I've just found EXCEPTION_DISPOSITION, present in C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\Professional\VC\Tools\MSVC\14.16.27023\include\excpt.h. This contains the function _except_handler(), which returns an EXCEPTION_DISPOSITION enum, which can be ExceptionNestedException (I believe this is the one I'm looking for).
So now the question turns into:

What parameters do I need to fill in in the function _except_handler() in order to know if I'm dealing with a nested exception (or does somebody know an easier way to get this done)?

  • 4
    What is __try __except ? that's obviously no standard c++ code. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 23 at 21:03
  • @πάνταῥεῖ __try/__except is Microsoft specific – Ayxan May 23 at 21:09
  • @Ayxan Well, I know that already. I just wanted to nudge the OP tagging and explaining their question better about that thing specifically. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 23 at 21:11
  • 1
    Where are your exception filters? Those are what give you the power to keep searching for a handler or not. – Ben Voigt May 23 at 21:52
  • 2
    @Dominique: Since you were not aware that SEH is not standard C++, I think it's fair to ask if you have considered using standard C++ exceptions? (Even Microsoft recommends ISO-standard C++ exception handling instead of SEH in C++.) If you really want SEH, that's fine; my intent is to make sure you are aware of the alternative, to make sure this is the question you want to ask. – JaMiT Jun 14 at 14:32
1
+200

You can use RaiseException.

see Using Structured Exception Handling (SEH) for more details.

#define SUBCODE 0x1000

int Filter(LPEXCEPTION_POINTERS exceptionPointers,DWORD& code) {
  code = exceptionPointers->ExceptionRecord->ExceptionCode;
  return EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER;
}

int function(){
  DWORD code;
  __try{
      do_something();
      return subfunction();
    } __except ( Filter( GetExceptionInformation(), code )  ){  
      if (code == SUBCODE) {
        show("specific case");      
      } else {
        show("generic code");
      }
    }
}

int subfunction(){
  __try{
    return do_something_else();
  } __except (EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER){
    RaiseException( SUBCODE , 0, 0 , NULL );
  }
}
  • 1
    Due to illness, I don't have time to verify your proposal, but it looks like it might indeed distinguish main and sub functions, so I've decided to reward you with the bounty. Thanks for the proposal. – Dominique Jun 20 at 10:06
1

Your code as written does not compile. Instead of:

__except { ... }

you need:

__except (EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER) { ... }

Then it works as desired.

Live demo

1
#include <iostream>
#include <Windows.h>

int do_something_else()
{
    *(reinterpret_cast<int*>(0)) = 1;
    return 0;
}

int do_something()
{
    return 0;
}

int subfunction();

int32_t ReportCrash(LPEXCEPTION_POINTERS ExceptionInfo) //exception and context pointers are hrere
{
    return EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER;
}

int function()
{
    __try 
    {
        do_something();
        return subfunction();
    }
    __except (ReportCrash(GetExceptionInformation()))
    {
        std::cout << ("general exception");
    }
    return 0;
}

int subfunction()
{
    __try 
    {
        return do_something_else();
    }
    __except (ReportCrash(GetExceptionInformation()))
    {
        std::cout << ("specific case");
    }
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hello World!\n"; 

    function();
}

The details are here

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