8

Normally, TypeScript can infer the type of a variable with the help of a guard follow by a return:

type Pet = Dog | Cat;
function isDog(pet: Pet): pet is Dog {
  return true;
}

function fn1(pet: Pet) {
  if (isDog(pet)) {
    return;
  }

  // At this point, TS knows that `pet` is a `Cat`.
}

However, if I were to change the return to process.exit, this does not work anymore:

function fn2(pet: Pet) {
  if (isDog(pet)) {
    process.exit(1);
  }

  // At this point, we know that `pet` should be a `Cat`, but TS doesn't know.
}

Is there a way for me to signal to the compiler that the program would have ended after process.exit, in a similar fashion as return?

Of course, I could just add a return after process.exit. However, in my actual code, my function is returning something, call it MyObject, such that there is no reasonable value for when pet is a Dog, hence the forceful exit.

I am aware that I could do some type assertions to get around this, but wondering what is a good way to solve this.

4 Answers 4

8

I believe it's a limitation of Typescript (even the latest version).

Workaround:

You can return process.exit(1).

type Pet = Dog | Cat

function isDog(pet: Pet): pet is Dog {
    return true
}

function fn1(pet: Pet) {
    if (isDog(pet)) {
        return process.exit(1)
    }

    return console.log(pet)
}

Typescript infers pet to be a Cat.

screenshot of code

3

It's a design limitation of TypeScript and there is no intention of fixing it. It wouldn't know that process.exit() causes the process to exit, in the same way as if you use a function that always throws an exception, it wouldn't know that either. Even if your function returns never.

Quote from maintainers:

Reachability in your example is determined by type, but the graph is built syntactically.

As a nicer workaround, you could write:

return process.exit(0);

Similar issue: https://github.com/microsoft/TypeScript/issues/8655

3

Stumbled upon this question in 2021 and the current answers are out-of-date.

As of TypeScript 3.7, any statement that returns never will assert that the lines under it will be marked as unreachable. source

This is how process.exit is typed in DefinitelyTyped.

0

To expand on Rico Kahler's answer, you can also wrap process.exit with a function returning never:

function abort(message: string): never {
    console.error(message)
    process.exit(1)
}

const x = Math.random() > 0.5 ? 42 : 'string'
if (typeof x === 'number') abort('we got a bad flip')
const y = x.toLowerCase()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.