9

I got the following code to try out file opening and writing (without spurt):

sub MAIN {
    my $h = open 'somefile.txt', :w, :a;

    for 1..4 {
        $fh.put: "hello";
    }
    $fh.close;
}

What I expected is that with each run, it should append 4 additional lines with "hello" to the file. However it still seems to overwrite the file, after 2 or more runs there are still only 4 lines.

$ perl6 opening.p6
$ cat somefile.txt
hello
hello
hello
hello
$ perl6 opening.p6
$ cat somefile.txt
hello
hello
hello
hello

Adding or removing :a or :append doesn't seem to influence this behaviour, what am I missing?

  • 3
    Use only :a See also open – Valle Lukas May 25 at 6:33
  • This is essentially a duplicate of How do you append to a file in Perl 6? so the answer will essentially be the same. Aiui, unless you know exactly what you are doing and are taking responsibility for potentially imploding the Universe, as explained in the doc Valle just linked, you should only use one of the 8 modes :r, :w, :a, :x, :update, :rw, :ra, or :rx in any given open call. You should not combine them. You should not use the other modes. – raiph May 25 at 21:49
  • @raiph Should there be a warning emitted when using problematic combinations of mode flags? – Christopher Bottoms May 31 at 13:40
  • 1
    @ChristopherBottoms I can't answer that with the nuance I'd want to provide in the space of one SO comment. (If you or someone else has opened a GH issue about this, please link to it and I will comment properly there.) Over simplifying... A warning might make sense. But if I were to consider such a thing I'd also consider forcing the 8 modes to only ever be used on their own, not in combination with any other mode, and to be fatal if they're combined. If folk want to combine then they would have to use the other modes. (And maybe they still warn if used in an unsupported combination.) – raiph May 31 at 14:20
12

According to the open documentation, you want

my $h = open 'somefile.txt', :a;

The one and two-letter shorthands are not modifiers, but useable in isolation, with :w expanding to

:mode<wo>, :create, :truncate

and :a expanding to

:mode<wo>, :create, :append

mimicking POSIX.

The combination :w, :append you tried should in fact also open the file in append mode - but only after truncating it first, which doesn't seem particularly useful...

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