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I need to define a Vector such that all elements in it need to be of the same type, though the type itself can be of any type. I tried the below:

["1", 2] isa AbstractVector{T} where T <: Any

but this returns true.

The following works in this case and correctly returns false as needed:

["1", 2] isa AbstractVector{T} where T <: Union{AbstractString, Number}

But, I don't want to restrict the type to be only Strings, Numbers etc. So, how else can I restrict all elements of a Vector to be of the same type though the type itself can be flexible?

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    If you have a vector v, you can try isconcretetype(eltype(v)). Note that your question is a bit ambiguous, because all abstract types and Union types are still a "single type". In my response I assume that you actually mean a single, concrete type.
    – DNF
    Commented May 25, 2019 at 7:52
  • @DNF I would not like to manually check this using isconcretetype() but would like to know if there is a way I can declare it in the type definition itself for the Vector. This vector would be passed as an argument by the caller of my function, so I would like to specify the type expected for the vector in the function signature itself.
    – WebDev
    Commented May 25, 2019 at 8:13
  • You're looking for a type signature that only admits vectors with concrete eltype?
    – DNF
    Commented May 25, 2019 at 8:16
  • Yes, for example [1, 2] or ["1", "2"] are acceptable inputs. But not ["1", 2]. Hope that is clear
    – WebDev
    Commented May 25, 2019 at 8:19
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    I'm not aware of any way of doing that. But you can perform that check manually in your function body, without loss of performance, due to type specialization.
    – DNF
    Commented May 25, 2019 at 8:19

1 Answer 1

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["2", 2] is of type Vector{Any} and T <: Any is true because setting T = Any gives Any <: Any which should evaluate to true.

"1" is a String and String <: AbstractString is true. But Julia's type system only works like this

T{S} <: T'{S} is true if T <: T' but is not true if T{S} <: T{S'} even if S <: S'. I don't know the technical term for that in type theory but it should be detailed in here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covariance_and_contravariance_(computer_science)

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