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I have been trying for quite some time to implement my code to run on GPU, however with little success. I would really appreciate someone helping with the implementation.

Let me say a few words about the problem. I have a graph G with N nodes and a distribution mx on each node x. I would like to compute the distance between the distributions for every pair of nodes for all edges. For a given pair, (x,y), I use the code ot.sinkhorn(mx, my, dNxNy) from the python POT package to compute the distance. Again, mx, my are vectors of size Nx and Ny on nodes x and y and dNxNy is a Nx x Ny distance matrix.

Now, I discovered that there is a GPU implementation of this code ot.gpu.sinkhorn(mx, my, dNxNy). However, this is not good enough because I mx, my and dNxNy would need to be uploaded to the GPU at every iteration, which is a massive overhead. So, the idea is to parallelise this for all edges on GPU.

The essence of the code is as follows. mx_all is all the distributions

for i,e in enumerate(G.edges):
    W[i] = W_comp(mx_all,dist,e)

def W_comp(mx_all, dist,  e):
    i = e[0]
    j = e[1]

    Nx = np.array(mx_all[i][1]).flatten()
    Ny = np.array(mx_all[j][1]).flatten()
    mx = np.array(mx_all[i][0]).flatten()
    my = np.array(mx_all[j][0]).flatten()

    dNxNy = dist[Nx,:][:,Ny].copy(order='C')

    W = ot.sinkhorn2(mx, my, dNxNy, 1)

Below is a minimal working example. Please ignore everything except the part between dashed === signs.

import ot
import numpy as np
import scipy as sc


def main():
    import networkx as nx

    #some example graph
    G = nx.planted_partition_graph(4, 20, 0.6, 0.3, seed=2)
    L = nx.normalized_laplacian_matrix(G)

    #this just computes all distributions (IGNORE)
    mx_all = []
    for i in G.nodes:
        mx_all.append(mx_comp(L,1,1,i))  

    #some random distance matrix (IGNORE)
    dist = np.random.randint(5,size=(nx.number_of_nodes(G),nx.number_of_nodes(G)))          

# ============================================================================= 
#this is what needs to be parallelised on GPU
    W = np.zeros(nx.Graph.size(G))
    for i,e in enumerate(G.edges):
        print(i)
        W[i] = W_comp(mx_all,dist,e)

    return W

def W_comp(mx_all, dist,  e):
    i = e[0]
    j = e[1]

    Nx = np.array(mx_all[i][1]).flatten()
    Ny = np.array(mx_all[j][1]).flatten()
    mx = np.array(mx_all[i][0]).flatten()
    my = np.array(mx_all[j][0]).flatten()

    dNxNy = dist[Nx,:][:,Ny].copy(order='C')

    return ot.sinkhorn2(mx, my, dNxNy,1)

# =============================================================================

#some other functions (IGNORE)
def delta(i, n):

    p0 = np.zeros(n)
    p0[i] = 1.

    return p0

# all neighbourhood densities
def mx_comp(L, t, cutoff, i):
    N = np.shape(L)[0]

    mx_all = sc.sparse.linalg.expm_multiply(-t*L, delta(i, N))
    Nx_all = np.argwhere(mx_all > (1-cutoff)*np.max(mx_all))

    return mx_all, Nx_all  

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()  

Thank you!!

  • Just for clarification: Do you just want it to run on the GPU? Or does it also have to be faster? Also why is this tagged numba, did you try to do it with numba or do you expect an answer to use numba? Also what exactly do you mean with "parallel", simply that you only transfer the arrays once to the GPU or should it be parallel in the sense of multiple threads/processes? – MSeifert Jun 1 at 13:59
  • @MSeifert Also why is this tagged numba, did you try to do it with numba or do you expect an answer to use numba? -- I do not expect the answer in numba, but I came across it as a potentially useful package. Also what exactly do you mean with "parallel", simply that you only transfer the arrays once to the GPU or should it be parallel in the sense of multiple threads/processes? -- Ideally arrays mx, my, dNxNy for several instances (as many as possible, could be a predefined number if easier) of the ot.gpu.sinkhorn(mx,my,dNxNy) function is transferred to the GPU and executed simultaneously. – Adam Gosztolai Jun 3 at 7:38
  • Do you just want it to run on the GPU? Or does it also have to be faster? -- Ideally both. The function ot.gpu.sinkhorn(mx,my,dNxNy) is already running on GPU. The problem is that it is executed in a loop, so at each iteration mx and my are uploaded to the GPU, which is the bottleneck. Instead, many instances of ot.gpu.sinkhorn should run in parallel. – Adam Gosztolai Jun 3 at 7:43
3
+50

There are some packages, which allow you to run code on your GPU.

You can use one of the following packages:

  1. pyCuda
  2. numba(Pro)
  3. Theano

When you want to use numba, the Python Anaconda distribution is recommended for doing this. Also, Anaconda Accelerate is needed. You can install it using conda install accelerate. In this example, you can see how the usage of the GPU is achieved https://gist.githubusercontent.com/aweeraman/ae6e40f54a924f1f5832081be9521d92/raw/d6775c421aa4fa4c0d582e6c58873499d28b913a/gpu.py . It's done by adding target='cuda' to the @vectorize decorator. Note the import from numba import vectorize. The vectorize decorator takes the signature of the function that is to be accelerated as input.

Good luck!


Sources:

https://weeraman.com/put-that-gpu-to-good-use-with-python-e5a437168c01 https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_do_I_run_a_python_code_in_the_GPU

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