147

What is the difference between -[UIViewController viewWillAppear:] and -[UIViewController viewDidAppear:]?

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  • 1
    thanks BoltClock, but please give me example of both if possible..
    – PJR
    Commented Apr 12, 2011 at 10:19
  • 3
    @BoltClock it would be nice if that were true. I'm guessing the 15 people who upvoted read the method name but never actually measured it ... Came here from Google because that is NOT the difference between them
    – Adam
    Commented Oct 10, 2012 at 16:55
  • 1
    Specifically: parentView.viewDidAppear is called A LONG TIME before Apple actually displays parentView ... Apple first (atomically) paints all subviews ... and if you have a lot of subviews, or complex ones, then "viewDidAppear" can be called tens or hundreds of milliseconds too soon :(.
    – Adam
    Commented Oct 10, 2012 at 16:57

14 Answers 14

305

In general, this is what I do:

  1. ViewDidLoad - Whenever I'm adding controls to a view that should appear together with the view, right away, I put it in the ViewDidLoad method. Basically, this method is called whenever the view was loaded into memory. So for example, if my view is a form with 3 labels, I would add the labels here; the view will never exist without these forms.

  2. ViewWillAppear: I use ViewWillAppear usually just to update the data on the form. So, for the example above, I would use this to actually load the data from my domain into the form. Creation of UIViews is fairly expensive, and you should avoid as much as possible doing that on the ViewWillAppear method because when this gets called, it means that the iPhone is already ready to show the UIView to the user, and anything heavy you do here will impact performance in a very visible manner (like animations being delayed, etc).

  3. ViewDidAppear: Finally, I'm using ViewDidAppear to start off new threads to things that would take a long time to execute, like for example doing a web service call to get extra data for the form above. The good thing is that because the view already exists and is being displayed to the user, you can show a nice "Waiting" message to the user while you get the data.

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  • 4
    Sorry, but what do you mean by "load the data from my domain into the form" in viewWillAppear? You mean downloading through network? But you also suggest download stuff in viewDidAppear?
    – Philip007
    Commented Dec 3, 2012 at 9:28
  • 1
    @Philip007 I think Stack is referring to this type of domain: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain-specific_modeling. The data is loaded from your models or similar.
    – dentarg
    Commented Dec 20, 2012 at 14:45
  • 2
    This answer should be in the docs. It was really helpful in clarifying the difference between the three methods. Thank you! Commented Oct 30, 2013 at 19:34
  • 1
    +1 I was having a little bit of confusion understanding the difference between these three, but you just cleared it up more than perfectly @ChetanBhalara
    – Chisx
    Commented Jan 12, 2014 at 19:54
  • @ChetanBhalara but if you put long work on ViewDidAppear you will easily make user confuse about UI :)
    – hqt
    Commented Sep 13, 2014 at 10:47
49

viewDidLoad ===>>> Put your initialization code here. Don't put dynamic data that might change during the view lifecycle. So, if you are pulling data from core data you don't want to do it here if this could change during the life of the view. For example: say you have a tab controller. You switch from tab1 to tab2 and change something on the model in tab2. If you come back to tab1 and your model code was done in viewDidLoad this would not be updated (assuming you're not using KVO or NSFetchedResultsController, etc.).

viewWillAppear ===>>> This is called every time the view is about to appear, whether or not the view is already in memory. Put your dynamic code here, such as model logic.

viewDidAppear ===>>> Put expensive operations here that you only want to do if you're sure the view is onscreen, such as network calls.

Notice: if your app is backgrounded and returns to the foreground you need to handle this using NSNotificationCenter. I wrote the code out for that in the comments below. You might think viewWillAppear/viewDidAppear will fire. Put a break point there and test it. It doesn't fire. So, if something has changed for your app while it was in the background you'll need to update that using notifications.

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  • 1
    Does ViewWill or ViewDid get run each time you un-minimize the application?
    – Jeef
    Commented Apr 2, 2014 at 20:30
  • 2
    @Jeef This is an excellent question. Neither gets run unless the app is killed by the system or the user while in the background. What you have to do to get notified when the app in un-minimized is you have to use NSNotificationCenter and addObserver for the name UIApplicationWillEnterForegroundNotification. The selector should be applicationWillEnterForeground: it has a NSNotification paramater. Put your code in that method for reloading data, etc. What you can do is create a reload method that you call form this method and also viewDidAppear if they need to be the same.
    – SmileBot
    Commented Apr 2, 2014 at 22:36
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    @Jeef something like this: - (void)viewDidLoad { [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(applicationWillEnterForeground:) name:UIApplicationWillEnterForegroundNotification object:nil]; } - (void) applicationWillEnterForeground: (NSNotification *)notif {// respond here with whatever }
    – SmileBot
    Commented Apr 2, 2014 at 22:39
13

The viewWillAppear method is called before loading the actual view.

The viewDidAppear method is called when the view is already loaded, and you want to show something.

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11

viewWillAppear:
■ Called before the view is added to the windows’ view hierarchy
■ Called before [vc.view layoutSubviews] (if necessary)
viewDidAppear:
■ Called after the view is added to the view hierarchy
■ Called after [vc.view layoutSubviews] (if necessary)

10

A few observations:

  • The viewDidLoad method is called when the view is first instantiated. IBOutlet references are hooked up by the time this has been called, but not before. The frame of the view may not be established by the time this has been called, though. This is a great place to add/configure subviews and their associated constraints. But if you are doing any manual configuration of frame values on the basis of the main view's dimensions, the configuration of those frames should be deferred until viewWillAppear or viewDidLayoutSubviews.

  • The viewWillAppear method is called when the presentation of the view in the view hierarchy is about to start. Notably, this is called at the start of the animation (if any) of the presentation of the view. Its companion, viewWillDisappear is obviously called when the transition away from this view begins.

  • The viewDidAppear method is called when the presentation of the view is done, notably when any and all associated animation has finished. Its companion, viewDidDisappear is obviously called when the transition away from this view is done.

Two important caveats:

  • viewDidLoad is called once and only once, when the view is first instantiated. On the other hand, viewWillAppear and viewDidAppear will be called not only when the view is first presented, but every subsequent time the same view in question is re-presented. For example, when you first present a view, all three of these methods will be called. If the view in question subsequently presents another view which is subsequently dismissed, the viewWillAppear and viewDidAppear will generally be called again when the view in question is added and animated back into the view hierarchy, but viewDidLoad will not. viewDidLoad is only called when this particular instance is first created.

    So, if you want to do something every time a view reappears (e.g. you dismiss or pop back to it), do it in viewWillAppear or viewDidAppear. If you want it to only happen when the view is first instantiated, do that in viewDidLoad.

  • The calling of viewWillAppear does not guarantee that transition to that view will ever be completed. Notably, if you are using interactive transition that are driven by real-time user input, but that interactive transition can be canceled. I.e., just because viewWillAppear is called, it does not mean that viewDidAppear will called. Generally it is, but if the interactive gesture is cancelled, it won't (because the transition never finished).

    At WWDC 2013, in the context of interactive transitions, a presenter joked that they should rename viewWillAppear to "viewMightAppear, or viewWillProbablyAppear, or iReallyWishThisViewWouldAppear".

    An example of a built-in interactive gesture is when using a UINavigationController and you "swipe from the left edge" to initiate a pop of the view. The viewWillAppear will be called for the view to which you are popping, but if you cancel that "swipe from left edge" to return back to the view from which you started this pop gesture, the pop is canceled and the viewDidAppear for the view you started to pop back to will never be called.

    The net effect of this is that you should be careful that you don't write code that assumes that every call to viewWillAppear will be followed eventually by a call to viewDidAppear. If the transition is canceled, this will not be the case.

5

viewwillappear will call before loading the view so that you can do certain task before loading that view and viewdidappear will call after loading the view so the post task will done in that method

5

1) ViewWillAppear: The view loaded actually in the memory, called once in the view controller and had its frame, but still didn't appear to the user

2) ViewDidAppear: The controller added to the view hierarchy, so you could present to the next controller, also, the view did layout the subviews

4

Difference between "will" and "did"...As the name suggests the viewWillAppear is called before the view is about to appear and viewDidAppear is called when view did appear.

1
  • look at the accepted answer bro, which contains 70+ upvotes. :)
    – PJR
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 11:53
3

The former happens before the view appears and the latter happens afterwards.

3

To sum up:

-viewWillAppear -> update data (reload data from a table view)

-viewDidAppear -> expensive operations (API call with a nice progress hud!)

1

As the name suggests the viewWillAppear is called before the view is about to appear and viewDidAppear is called when view did appear.

0

Usecase, i.e when should I use which ?

viewDidLoad - when labels, buttons(i,e any controls/subviews) are connected to the View's interface file and if you want to load all these at the same time as the ViewController's View, and if you want to load this into memory once and be done with it

viewWillAppear - say, you want to change the background color of the view everytime the viewController appears on the screen. Or more realistically if you want DarkMode background color at night time of the day, and light color of the background view during day time, go for this code in viewWillAppear

Another good usecase here https://stackoverflow.com/a/39395865/5438240

Also note that , if you are using a Navigation stack(UINavigationController), the viewController that is about to be popped has the viewWillDisappear() called, and the ViewController that will next be on top of the stack will have viewWillAppear() called

0

In general, this is what I do:

  1. ViewDidLoad - Whenever I'm adding controls to a view that should appear together with the view, right away, I put it in the ViewDidLoad method. Basically this method is called whenever the view was loaded into memory. So for example, if my view is a form with 3 labels, I would add the labels here; the view will never exist without those forms.

  2. ViewWillAppear: I use ViewWillAppear usually just to update the data on the form. So, for the example above, I would use this to actually load the data from my domain into the form. Creation of UIViews is fairly expensive, and you should avoid as much as possible doing that on the ViewWillAppear method, becuase when this gets called, it means that the iPhone is already ready to show the UIView to the user, and anything heavy you do here will impact performance in a very visible manner (like animations being delayed, etc).

  3. ViewDidAppear: Finally, I use the ViewDidAppear to start off new threads to things that would take a long time to execute, like for example doing a webservice call to get extra data for the form above.The good thing is that because the view already exists and is being displayed to the user, you can show a nice "Waiting" message to the user while you get the data.

0
0

viewDidLoad - this function is called when a particular view controller class is loaded into memory. Using this method, you can perform additional initialization on views that were loaded from storyboard/nib files.

ViewWillAppear - notifies and performs the custom task associated with displaying the view.

ViewDidApper - to perform additional tasks associated with presenting the view. If you override this method, you must call super at some point in your implementation.

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