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I have a list like below:

lst1 = [[5, 0], [5, 3], [6, 2], [6, 1], [4, 0], [4, 1], [4, 3], [7, 2], [7, 1], [7, 3], [0, 3], [2, 1], [3, 8]]

I want to create a list like below:

lst2 = [[5, 0, 3, 8], [6, 2, 1], [4, 0, 3, 8], [7, 2, 1], [5, 3, 8]]

[5, 0, 3, 8] is created from [5, 0], [0, 3], and [3, 8] because the last item of [5, 0] matched with the first item of [0, 3] and the last item of [0, 3] matched with the first element of [3, 8]. Similarly, [6, 2, 1] is from [6, 2] and [2, 1] and so on. The problem is how can I iterate lst1 and create lst2? I know how to iterate list/list of lists, extract items, etc. but the difficulty I have here is by iterating lst1 once how can I create lst2.

  • It looks like you want to remove elements that participate in solutions as you go, as you don't seem to want [5, 3, 8] from [5, 3] and [3, 8], correct? Also, are there duplicate elements in lst1? Or are all pairs in lst1 unique? – Mike May 26 '19 at 1:37
  • I don't want to remove elements. Just mentioned few of them for instance (now updated). It should happen among all the pairs in lst1. All pairs in lst1 are unique. – utij2004 May 26 '19 at 1:39
  • 1
    Are you guaranteed to have only one match for the last item. For example, given [5, 0] do you know there is only one item starting with 0 if not what should you do? – Mark Meyer May 26 '19 at 2:22
  • No, there could be more than item starting with 0. For instance, if lst1 = [[5, 0], [0, 3], [0, 4]], then lst2=[[5, 0, 3], [5, 0, 4]]. – utij2004 May 26 '19 at 2:26
  • So you're looking for all maximal paths in the directed graph whose edges are given by the input? There could be exponentially many of those. What are you planning to do with this output? – user2357112 supports Monica May 26 '19 at 3:11
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Well, I can iterate over the top loop "once," but it's not really "once," in that each iteration waltzes over its sublist. O(n^2), if I'm not mistaken:

lst1 = [[5, 0], [5, 3], [6, 2], [6, 1], [4, 0], [4, 1], [4, 3], [7, 2], [7, 1], [7, 3], [0, 3], [2, 1], [3, 8]]


def accept(root, pair):
    if root[-1] == pair[0]:
        root.append(pair[1])


def longest_for_root(root, pairs):
    for i, pair in enumerate(pairs):
        accept(root, pairs[i])


def strings_for_list(pairs):
    for i, pair in enumerate(pairs):
        if i < len(pairs) - 1:
            lfr = pairs[i].copy()
            longest_for_root(lfr, pairs[i + 1:])
            if len(lfr) > 2:
                yield lfr

[*strings_for_list(lst1)]

# [[5, 0, 3, 8], [5, 3, 8], [6, 2, 1], [4, 0, 3, 8], [4, 3, 8], [7, 2, 1], [7, 3, 8], [0, 3, 8]]

Another option that presents itself is to put the entries in a dict, keyed by their initial and terminal digits, but I think that just changes what accept() looks like.

I presumed that you're looking for matches "in order," by which we mean that [[5,0],[0,3]] produces [5, 0, 3], but [[0,3],[5,0]] produces nothing.

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