6

Despite the Random generator only being created once, the output is always the same random result (for all three test outputs).

A test snippet from a slightly larger script:

   let myRandGen = System.Random()
   let getRandomObject = 
      let options = [|"Bob"; "Jim"; "Jane"|]
      let randIndex  = myRandGen.Next(options.Length) 
      options.[randIndex] 

   printfn "New one: %s" getRandomObject
   printfn "New two: %s" getRandomObject
   printfn "New three: %s" getRandomObject

I need the output to be random for each call, which it currently isn't.

Example output:

New one: Jane
New two: Jane
New three: Jane
12

Your getRandomObject is a value. It is evaluated once. To fix this, make getRandomObject a function:

let getRandomObject () = 
  let options = [|"Bob"; "Jim"; "Jane"|]
  let randIndex  = myRandGen.Next(options.Length) 
  options.[randIndex]

and call it like so: getRandomObject ()

  • Thanks you, This makes sense but I'm now getting a squiggly line under the "options.[randIndex]" saying; "The result of this expression has type 'string' and is implicitly ignored.". I don't understand the issue as I thought the function would be unit -> string (in fact it's unit -> 'a) – McGreggus May 26 at 7:31
  • 2
    The type of getRandomObject id unit -> string. I would guess you have an indentation problem somewhere. Maybe check the indentation of "printfn "New one: %s" (getRandomObject ())" (or whatever comes after "options.[randIndex]") – nilekirk May 26 at 8:20
  • On a side note, be aware that if you run this function in a tight loop, you might get results that are not randomly distributed, since the entropy (or rather the values used to calculate it) does not change/refill fast enough. Always plan to use a slight delay between calls. – Markus Deibel May 27 at 6:55
  • @MarkusDeibel Wait, what? For sure the PRNG is deterministic... I mean, you can provide a seed to always get the same sequence. Or is this not the case here? (I didn't test it...) – sebhofer May 27 at 14:58
  • I've run into issues where you exhaust the entropy with a tight loop and subsequently the system is not able to reproduce new values fast enough. I have not tested it with F#'s RNG, though. – Markus Deibel May 28 at 6:13
4

This works for me:

   let myRandGen = System.Random()
   let getRandomObject () = 
      let options = [|"Bob"; "Jim"; "Jane"|]
      let randIndex  = myRandGen.Next(options.Length) 
      options.[randIndex] 

   printfn "New one: %s" (getRandomObject())
   printfn "New two: %s" (getRandomObject())
   printfn "New three: %s" (getRandomObject())

  • I didn't realize that that function calls like that needed to be parenthesized. Thank you very much Scott - it works! ~ – McGreggus May 26 at 23:01
  • 1
    Yeah, the parentheses are required because without them the compiler doesn't know if () is an argument to getRandomObject or to printfn. In F#, the () means a value of type unit, which is similar to void in other languages. If you don't like the parentheses, you could use the back pipe operator <| instead, but F#'s creator, Don Syme, discourages the use of that operator because it's less readable. The forward pipe |> , on the other hand, is widely used to show the flow of data through a series of functions. – Scott Hutchinson May 27 at 17:59
0

You generated your random number once, which doesn't change throughout the whole program. To have a new random value after every use, you must re-initialize the random value.

  • myRandGen is a random generator, not a random value, and doesn't need to be reinitialized. – Alexey Romanov May 26 at 8:06

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