1

I understand that while defining functions we have to use self as the first argument but in my particular coding example for insert_node method I got an error while calling insert_node(node,new_node) saying 3 arguments expected when I did not use self as the first argument in insert_node

class Node:
    def __init__(self,value=None):
        self.value = value
        self.left = None
        self.right = None
class BST:
    def __init__(self,value=None):
        self.root = Node(value)
    def insert(self,value):
        if self.root == None:
            self.root = Node(value)
            return
        curr = self.root
        new_node = Node(value)
        def insert_node(self,node,new_node):
            if node.value == new_node.value:
                return
            if node.value > new_node.value:
                if node.left is None:
                    node.left = new_node
                    return
                else:
                    insert_node(self,node.left,new_node)
            else:
                if node.right is None:
                    node.right = new_node
                    return
                else:
                    insert_node(self,node.right,new_node)
        insert_node(self,curr,new_node)
  • 4
    Is that the actual indentation? insert_node isn't an instance method, it's a nested function inside one. – jonrsharpe May 26 at 21:40
  • 2
    insert_node() is not a method, it is a function nested inside insert(). – Martijn Pieters May 26 at 21:41
4

insert_node() is not a method, it is a function nested inside insert(). You don't need to use self in this function, at all, because it makes no use of that argument, and even if it did, it could access the self reference from the parent insert() method as a closure.

Removing the self argument altogether works:

class BST:
    def __init__(self,value=None):
        self.root = Node(value)

    def insert(self,value):
        if self.root == None:
            self.root = Node(value)
            return
        curr = self.root
        new_node = Node(value)

        def insert_node(node, new_node):
            if node.value == new_node.value:
                return
            if node.value > new_node.value:
                if node.left is None:
                    node.left = new_node
                    return
                else:
                    insert_node(node.left, new_node)
            else:
                if node.right is None:
                    node.right = new_node
                    return
                else:
                    insert_node(node.right, new_node)

        insert_node(curr, new_node)

You can move that function out of the insert() method too, it doesn't need to be nested there:

def insert_node(node, new_node):
    if node.value == new_node.value:
        return
    if node.value > new_node.value:
        if node.left is None:
            node.left = new_node
            return
        else:
            insert_node(node.left, new_node)
    else:
        if node.right is None:
            node.right = new_node
            return
        else:
            insert_node(node.right, new_node)

class BST:
    def __init__(self,value=None):
        self.root = Node(value)

    def insert(self,value):
        if self.root == None:
            self.root = Node(value)
            return
        curr = self.root
        new_node = Node(value)
        insert_node(curr, new_node)

However, this really should be a method on the Node class:

class Node:
    def __init__(self, value=None):
        self.value = value
        self.left = None
        self.right = None

    def insert_node(self, new_node):
        if self.value == new_node.value:
            return
        if self.value > new_node.value:
            if self.left is None:
                self.left = new_node
                return
            else:
                self.left.insert_node(new_node)
        else:
            if self.right is None:
                self.right = new_node
                return
            else:
                self.right.insert_node(new_node)

class BST:
    def __init__(self,value=None):
        self.root = Node(value)

    def insert(self,value):
        if self.root == None:
            self.root = Node(value)
            return
        curr = self.root
        new_node = Node(value)
        curr.insert_node(new_node)

Because you access insert_node() on Node instances (via curr.insert_node(...), self.left.insert_node(...) and self.right.insert_node(...), it is bound to that instance for you by Python, and passed into the method as self.

  • Thanks, should I not use nested functions when I just want the call to be internal to a class method? – vkaul11 May 26 at 21:56
  • @vkaul11: no, not really. Python has no privacy model, it expects programmers to be responsible instead. You can name the function _insert_node if you want to flag it as API private, but that's no more than a convention. – Martijn Pieters May 26 at 21:58
  • @vkaul11: use nested functions when you need access to a closure, not to hide things. – Martijn Pieters May 26 at 21:58
  • You mean only function closures? – vkaul11 May 26 at 22:06
  • @vkaul11: there are no other kind in Python, not sure what you are asking? – Martijn Pieters May 27 at 13:18

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