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I'm simply trying to make my life easier. My issue, and i know ways around it, is that I can't directly access my mysqli_connect object from a function, the function has to be handed the object as an argument.

define_constant( MYSQLI , mysqli_connect( "localhost","my_user","my_password","my_db" ) );

Currently done similar to:

$link = mysqli_connect("localhost","my_user","my_password","my_db");

function doSqlStuff( $link ){
    //Run my sql statments here using the link passed through the fuction
    $sql = "INSERT INTO MyGuests (firstname, lastname, email)
    VALUES ('John', 'Doe', '[email protected]')";

    if ($link->query($sql) === TRUE) {
        echo "New record created successfully";
    } else {
        echo "Error: " . $sql . "<br>" . $link->error;
    }
}
doSqlStuff( $link );

How I would prefer to call as a easier way

define_constant( MYSQLI , mysqli_connect("localhost","my_user","my_password","my_db") );

function doSqlStuff(){
    //Run my sql statments here using the link as a constant
    $sql = "INSERT INTO MyGuests (firstname, lastname, email)
    VALUES ('John', 'Doe', '[email protected]')";

    if (MYSQLI->query($sql) === TRUE) {
        echo "New record created successfully";
    } else {
        echo "Error: " . $sql . "<br>" . MYSQLI->error;
    }
}
doSqlStuff();

My general feeling is that this is a bad idea. However it would make my life easier, and I can't think of a reason not to do this.

Could this work, or is there something similar that might do the trick to access the mysqli connection without having to pass the object each time.

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    I would recommend that you stick to what you have. That's actually a recommended way of doing it. It's called "dependency injection" and is far better than defining things in globals (since that might require a lot more mocking when you run tests for your code). It's also much clearer since you can just look at the signature and understand what dependencies the function has. Commented May 27, 2019 at 11:07
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    Wrap the code in a class. Your database connection resource becomes a private property initialised in the constructor, either from passed in parameters, or passed in as a resource. Properties can be accessed from any method in the class.
    – user9613905
    Commented May 27, 2019 at 11:09
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    @ReddHerring so now you will have to pass that class' instance around instead. Another object, the same problem. Commented May 27, 2019 at 11:11
  • For the record, I searched around a fair bit before I made this question, and did not come across the other question. The other question is more focused on a point where this is more open yet concise. Commented May 27, 2019 at 11:32

1 Answer 1

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Actually you can not use constant to store non-static data. But you can create singleton-type class to access your connection link.

<?php

class Connection
{
    private static $link;

    static public function link() {
        if (self::$link === null) {
            self::$link = mysqli_connect( "localhost","my_user","my_password","my_db" );
        }

        return self::$link; 
    }
}

function doSqlStuff(){
    //Run my sql statments here using the link as a constant
    $sql = "INSERT INTO MyGuests (firstname, lastname, email) VALUES ('John', 'Doe', '[email protected]')";

    if (Connection::link()->query($sql) === TRUE) {
        echo "New record created successfully";
    } else {
        echo "Error: " . $sql . "<br>" . Connection::link()->error;
    }
}
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  • 1
    Pity I was too slow closing this question. I should have known that a singleton answer will appear inevitably. Commented May 27, 2019 at 11:12
  • This will do exactly what I'm after, and is a good simple way of doing it. Commented May 27, 2019 at 11:29

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