2

You can see from the code blocks below that inside Description.js I had to pass down a prop named "index", because handleChange is a function that must be called with two parameters handleChange(newValue,index).

The handleChange function updates the state, which in this case, is an array if length 3 (one value for each input).

And since the index is created by the Description.js component, I had to pass that down as props.

It works as intended.

QUESTION

Is this a bad practice? Is index a reserved word somehow (of React, Javascript or HTML)?

Is there a better approach to this?


App.js

import React, { useState, useCallback } from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";
import Description from "./Description";

function App() {
  console.log("Rendering App...");
  const [inputValues, setInputValues] = useState(["", "", ""]);

  const handleChange = useCallback((newValue, index) => {
    setInputValues(prevState => {
      const aux = Array.from(prevState);
      aux[index] = newValue;
      return aux;
    });
  }, []);

  return <Description values={inputValues} handleChange={handleChange} />;
}

Description.js

import React from "react";
import TextInput from "./TextInput";

function Description(props) {
  console.log("Rendering Description...");
  const inputItems = props.values.map((item, index) => (
    <div key={index}>
      <div>Input {index + 1}</div>
      <TextInput value={item} handleChange={props.handleChange} index={index} />
    </div>
  ));

  return <React.Fragment>{inputItems}</React.Fragment>;
}

TextInput.js

import React from "react";

const TextInput = React.memo(function TextInput(props) {
  console.log("Rendering TextInput..." + props.index);
  return (
    <input
      type="text"
      value={props.value}
      onChange={event => props.handleChange(event.target.value, props.index)}
    />
  );
});

2

There’s nothing wrong with what you’re doing, but you can call the prop and the function argument whatever you want. It doesn’t have to be named index. They don’t even have to be the same.

You could do this and it would work exactly the same:

const handleChange = useCallback((newValue, bananas) => {
    setInputValues(prevState => {
      const aux = Array.from(prevState);
      aux[bananas] = newValue;
      return aux;
    });
  }, []);

Same with this:

const TextInput = React.memo(function TextInput(props) {
  console.log("Rendering TextInput..." + props.wookie);
  return (
    <input
      type="text"
      value={props.value}
      onChange={event => props.handleChange(event.target.value, props.wookie)}
    />
  );
});

// and then...
<TextInput value={item} handleChange={props.handleChange} wookie={index} />


2

No, index is not a reserved prop name. Actually the only reserved names that I know of are ref and key

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