1

I've got a library of portable C++ networking code that makes a lot of use of abstract and semi-abstract interface classes, e.g. stuff like this:

// Semi-abstract interface for any C++ object that wants to
// be notified about network events
class INetworkEventReceiver
{
public:
   INetworkEventReceiver(INetworkEventGenerator * master)
      : m_master (master)
   {
      m_master->RegisterEventReceiver(this);
   }

   virtual ~INetworkEventReceiver()
   {
      m_master->UnregisterEventReceiver(this);
   }

   // Called by our m_master object whenever a network event happens
   // Implemented by subclasses to do something useful.
   virtual void NetworkEventReceived(const NetworkEvent & event) = 0;

private:
   INetworkEventGenerator * m_master;
};

That all works fine. However, there is now interest in using this library in an iOS app, via Objective C++.

My question is, what is the best way for Objective-C++ code to implement "hook methods" like NetworkEventReceived(const NetworkEvent & event) above? I was hoping that an Objective-C++ class could simply subclass INetworkEventReceiver and declare its own virtual method, the way a C++ subclass would, but it seems that Objective-C++ doesn't support that. What is the next-best way to accomplish this?

1

You can embed a C++ class as an ivar in an Objective-C class. Something like:

// header:
@interface Receiver : NSObject
@end

// .mm:
// declare any methods with C++ typed parameters or return types here so the header
// can be #imported in Objective-C, not just Obj-C++. This class extension 
// can also be moved to an Objective-C++-only header if necessary to get to 
// those methods from multiple .mm files.

@interface Receiver()
- (void) receivedNetworkEvent:(const NetworkEvent& event)event;
@end


struct ConcreteReceiver : INetworkEventReceiver
{
  __weak Receiver* target;

  virtual void NetworkEventReceived(const NetworkEvent& event) override;

};

void ConcreteReceiver::NetworkEventReceived(const NetworkEvent& event)
{
  [this->target receivedNetworkEvent:event];
}


@implementation Receiver
{
  ConcreteReceiver receiverShim;
}

- (instancetype)init
{
  self = [super init];
  if (self != nil)
  {
    self->receiverShim.target = self;
  }
  return self;
}

- (void) receivedNetworkEvent:(const NetworkEvent& event)event
{
  // Do the thing
}

@end

It's a little awkward, especially with larger interfaces, but it works. Note that the C++ object holds a __weak reference to its containing Objective-C object to avoid leaks.

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