928

How to add days to current Date using JavaScript. Does JavaScript have a built in function like .Net's AddDay?

41 Answers 41

1040

You can create one with:-

Date.prototype.addDays = function(days) {
    var date = new Date(this.valueOf());
    date.setDate(date.getDate() + days);
    return date;
}

var date = new Date();

alert(date.addDays(5));

This takes care of automatically incrementing the month if necessary. For example:

8/31 + 1 day will become 9/1.

The problem with using setDate directly is that it's a mutator and that sort of thing is best avoided. ECMA saw fit to treat Date as a mutable class rather than an immutable structure.

  • 16
    Simplified: Date.prototype.addDays=function(d){return new Date(this.valueOf()+864E5*d);}; – Duncan Oct 15 '14 at 17:51
  • 22
    @Duncan Are you sure this is the same as the above? This one simply adds 24 hours, but one day is not always 24 hours. I guess the question is how to increment the date part by 1 day, without changing the time part. – Tamás Bolvári Dec 19 '15 at 6:41
  • 69
    864E5 for some reason I prefer to write 24*60*60 in my code :) – Mars Robertson Jan 21 '16 at 20:53
  • 47
    Guys, do not use method of adding 864E5 because this does not take daylight saving difference where days can be 23 or 25 hours. – sbrbot Jul 25 '16 at 21:44
  • 8
    For those of you worried about Daylight Savings -- Don't. These algorithms change the underlying date, not how the date is interpreted. DST is implemented in the getters and setters of the date -- the getters to subtract an hour in the summer, and the setter to add that hour back during the summer to normalize the time. But only when using an absolute hour -- relative hours don't need to be interpreted. This is why date math works. IMHO... – Gerard ONeill Nov 22 '16 at 16:53
669

Correct Answer:

function addDays(date, days) {
  var result = new Date(date);
  result.setDate(result.getDate() + days);
  return result;
}

Incorrect Answer:

This answer sometimes provides the correct result but very often returns the wrong year and month. The only time this answer works is when the date that you are adding days to happens to have the current year and month.

// Don't do it this way!
function addDaysWRONG(date, days) {
  var result = new Date();
  result.setDate(date.getDate() + days);
  return result;
}

Proof / Example

Check this JsFiddle

// Correct
function addDays(date, days) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setDate(result.getDate() + days);
    return result;
}

// Bad Year/Month
function addDaysWRONG(date, days) {
    var result = new Date();
    result.setDate(date.getDate() + days);
    return result;
}

// Bad during DST
function addDaysDstFail(date, days) {
    var dayms = (days * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
    return new Date(date.getTime() + dayms);    
}

// TEST
function formatDate(date) {
    return (date.getMonth() + 1) + '/' + date.getDate() + '/' + date.getFullYear();
}

$('tbody tr td:first-child').each(function () {
    var $in = $(this);
    var $out = $('<td/>').insertAfter($in).addClass("answer");
    var $outFail = $('<td/>').insertAfter($out);
    var $outDstFail = $('<td/>').insertAfter($outFail);
    var date = new Date($in.text());
    var correctDate = formatDate(addDays(date, 1));
    var failDate = formatDate(addDaysWRONG(date, 1));
    var failDstDate = formatDate(addDaysDstFail(date, 1));

    $out.text(correctDate);
    $outFail.text(failDate);
    $outDstFail.text(failDstDate);
    $outFail.addClass(correctDate == failDate ? "right" : "wrong");
    $outDstFail.addClass(correctDate == failDstDate ? "right" : "wrong");
});
body {
    font-size: 14px;
}

table {
    border-collapse:collapse;
}
table, td, th {
    border:1px solid black;
}
td {
    padding: 2px;
}

.wrong {
    color: red;
}
.right {
    color: green;
}
.answer {
    font-weight: bold;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<table>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">DST Dates</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>03/10/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/03/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/09/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/02/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/08/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">2013</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>01/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>02/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>04/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>05/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>06/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>07/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>08/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>09/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>10/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>12/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">2014</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>01/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>02/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>04/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>05/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>06/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>07/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>08/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>09/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>10/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>12/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">2015</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>01/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>02/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>04/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>05/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>06/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>07/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>08/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>09/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>10/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>12/01/2015</td></tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

  • Same as this one right? – bzlm Oct 30 '13 at 19:26
  • @bzlm, Yes essentially the same. It just doesn't modify the Date prototype. I also wanted to point out the flaws in the main answer. – sparebytes Oct 30 '13 at 19:27
  • 7
    @bzlm: Yes, I believe the note should read "this approach fails if the 'from' date is not in the same year or month as the current date". I still worry that users will glance over the answer and not read the warning since it doesn't stand out. Thanks. – sparebytes Oct 30 '13 at 19:40
  • 3
    I think, even if this work it is not correct. There is no such constructor for Date: var result = new Date(date);, see http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_dates.asp. Even if this usually work, sometimes can lead to wrong results because of conversion to string and vice versa. It should be var result = new Date(date.getTime()); – Marcin Nov 10 '15 at 10:22
  • 2
    @AnkitBalyan, See other answers. It may not work correctly due to Daylights Savings Time – sparebytes Jul 31 '17 at 16:49
168
var today = new Date();
var tomorrow = new Date();
tomorrow.setDate(today.getDate()+1);

Be careful, because this can be tricky. When setting "tomorrow", it only works because it's current value matches the year and month for "today". However, setting to a date number like "32" normally will still work just fine to move it to the next month.

  • 1
    Yeah? But what is this? (ran on March 31st, 2010): today = new Date(); tomorrow = new Date(); tomorrow.setDate(today.getDate()+1); alert(tomorrow.getMonth()); Says "3". alert(tomorrow); is correct... Why??? – d-_-b Mar 31 '10 at 2:44
  • 10
    @sims month is 0 indexed. Month 3 is April – Joel Coehoorn Mar 31 '10 at 3:26
  • 6
    Why the need to create 2 separate date objects? Why not simply use the same date object: var d = new Date(); d.setDate( d.getDate() + 1 );? – Joseph Silber Mar 25 '12 at 15:03
  • 8
    This approach doesn't work across years. If your starting date is from a few years ago, getDate() returns the day of that year. Then, calling setDate sets the day in the current year. So it is NOT a good general solution. @AnthonyWJones's answer actually works correctly. – Drew Noakes Oct 14 '13 at 10:55
  • 3
    @DrewNoakes—your assertion that it doesn't work across years is wrong. getDate returns the day in the month, not "day of that year". E.g. var d = new Date(2015,11,30);d.setDate(d.getDate() + 370) gives 3 Jan 2017 which crosses 2 years. – RobG Dec 6 '16 at 23:09
98

My simple solution is:

nextday=new Date(oldDate.getFullYear(),oldDate.getMonth(),oldDate.getDate()+1);

this solution does not have problem with daylight saving time. Also, one can add/sub any offset for years, months, days etc.

day=new Date(oldDate.getFullYear()-2,oldDate.getMonth()+22,oldDate.getDate()+61);

is correct code.

  • 11
    Note: this resets time to 00:00:00 (can be an issue or not) – Álvaro González Feb 20 '13 at 11:45
  • Doesn't work on the last day of any month, as you say. Makes this unusable on 12 days of the year. Sounds like a nightmare to debug!!! – Drew Noakes Oct 14 '13 at 10:59
  • 4
    No Drew, it is usable for all days on year. You can put date offset bigger than 31 or month offset bigger than 12 and this function will recalculate it as day in next month or month in next year. So for example: nextday=new Date(oldDate.getFullYear(),oldDate.getMonth(),oldDate.getDate()+40); is perfectly well code. – sbrbot Nov 11 '13 at 7:30
  • will this work across year boundaries? – Dom Vinyard Jun 11 '15 at 10:15
  • there is getMonth()+22 - what you think will it work!? – sbrbot Jun 11 '15 at 11:20
79

These answers seem confusing to me, I prefer:

var ms = new Date().getTime() + 86400000;
var tomorrow = new Date(ms);

getTime() gives us milliseconds since 1970, and 86400000 is the number of milliseconds in a day. Hence, ms contains milliseconds for the desired date.

Using the millisecond constructor gives the desired date object.

  • 40
    This solution doesn't take daylight savings into account. So, for example, this will return the same date, 23 hours later: new Date(new Date('11/4/2012').getTime() + 86400000) – Noah Harrison Mar 20 '12 at 14:55
  • 5
    @NoahMiller The problem which you bring up could be a feature not a bug! Adding 24 hours per day is sometimes the right thing to do, with the goal of knowing the resulting time based on DST. The date that your example returns has a time value of 11pm on November 4th which is what 24 hours later is on that particular day. The original poster asked about datetime which would seem to indicate some desire for correct times of the day. This answer is correct if you are in the case when your goal is the time 24 hours later. – Andy Novocin Jun 23 '14 at 15:12
  • 2
    I agree Noah, var d2 = new Date(d1.valueOf() + 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000) does what it says, adds a full day worth of ticks to a date. – Corey Alix Jul 18 '14 at 16:44
  • 6
    This is absolutely correct for some cases (for example for 1 day cookies) and a simpler solution than most of the others. I dont get why it has so many downvotes and so few upvotes :/ – Matmarbon Nov 6 '14 at 12:05
45

Try

var someDate = new Date();
var duration = 2; //In Days
someDate.setTime(someDate.getTime() +  (duration * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));

Using setDate() to add a date wont solve your problem, try adding some days to a Feb month, if you try to add new days to it, it wont result in what you expected.

  • 23
    No, this should not be marked as the correct answer since this solution assumes that every day has 24*60*60*1000 seconds but it does not (daylight saving)! – sbrbot Jan 12 '13 at 9:06
  • Any evidence about the 'Feb' problem with setDate()? Is it this: stackoverflow.com/questions/5497637/… – nobar Feb 4 '13 at 3:21
  • This doesn't work with daylight saving time. – Trident D'Gao Mar 2 '13 at 19:05
  • 8
    +1 This SHOULD be marked as the correct answer. I believe that "daylight saving" is about presentation and not about value, which is just the number of milliseconds. From value-point of view - day is CONST number of millisecs, while in terms of presentation it may vary. – disfated Mar 17 '15 at 8:17
  • 1
    @disfated—this is not the correct answer. The day going out of daylight saving has 25 hours, but this method only adds 24 so the date will be the same. Using 24hrs to represent a day works if UTC methods are used instead, but why bother when using setDate is more convenient? ;-) – RobG Dec 6 '16 at 23:13
32

Just spent ages trying to work out what the deal was with the year not adding when following the lead examples below.

If you want to just simply add n days to the date you have you are best to just go:

myDate.setDate(myDate.getDate() + n);

or the longwinded version

var theDate = new Date(2013, 11, 15);
var myNewDate = new Date(theDate);
myNewDate.setDate(myNewDate.getDate() + 30);
console.log(myNewDate);

This today/tomorrow stuff is confusing. By setting the current date into your new date variable you will mess up the year value. if you work from the original date you won't.

  • 5
    Reading all the answers around until I find this jewel here. Now that makes sense. Amazing that the today/tomorrow thing was copied in almost all the answers, when it does not make sense at all and it is not "for readibility and clarity" as the author says in the most upvoted answer -in the most upvoted comment-, it is confusing and a bad practice and wrong – Cesc Aug 8 '14 at 6:01
22

If you can, use moment.js. JavaScript doesn't have very good native date/time methods. The following is an example Moment's syntax:

var nextWeek = moment().add(7, 'days');
alert(nextWeek);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.17.1/moment-with-locales.min.js"></script>

Reference: http://momentjs.com/docs/#/manipulating/add/

  • 1
    @kpull1 the asker did not restrict the solution domain by asking if a built-in solution exists. – user2910265 Oct 30 '14 at 16:15
  • 3
    Modern note: Moment.js is incredibly heavy to add for such a small purpose. It's several hundred KB, and isn't webpack-friendly out of the box. – Joshua Comeau Nov 25 '16 at 13:24
  • 1
    Our preferred library is date-fns. Webpack-friendly, fast, and treats Dates as immutable. – Luke Williams Jun 6 '17 at 20:59
  • 1
    @LukeWilliams never heard of date-fns until now. will check it out. thanks. – user2910265 Jun 6 '17 at 21:23
  • 2
    @JoshuaComeau If you download it from cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.19.3/moment.min.js, it takes up 53,248 bytes on disk. I imagine that's the whole ball o' wax, but I don't know. Anyway, whatever. It's not a big deal. – birdus Dec 4 '17 at 18:53
18
int days = 1;
var newDate = new Date(Date.now() + days * 24*60*60*1000);

CodePen

var days = 2;
var newDate = new Date(Date.now() + days * 24*60*60*1000);

document.write('Today: <em>');
document.write(new Date());
document.write('</em><br/> New: <strong>');
document.write(newDate);

  • Helped me, thank you. – Alexander Kim Jan 17 '16 at 12:15
  • 2
    Upvote for not requiring an intermediate date variable. – Jeff Lowery Jan 4 '17 at 1:15
  • this is the best answer because it doesn't have mutation – knocte Aug 21 '17 at 16:24
  • Not every day has 24h, it fails for DST and leap seconds. – Stephan Aug 24 '17 at 12:59
17

I created these extensions last night:
you can pass either positive or negative values;

example:

var someDate = new Date();
var expirationDate = someDate.addDays(10);
var previous = someDate.addDays(-5);


Date.prototype.addDays = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 86400000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addSeconds = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 1000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addMinutes = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 60000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addHours = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 3600000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addMonths = function (num) {
    var value = new Date(this.valueOf());

    var mo = this.getMonth();
    var yr = this.getYear();

    mo = (mo + num) % 12;
    if (0 > mo) {
        yr += (this.getMonth() + num - mo - 12) / 12;
        mo += 12;
    }
    else
        yr += ((this.getMonth() + num - mo) / 12);

    value.setMonth(mo);
    value.setYear(yr);
    return value;
}
  • 6
    The .addDays() method does not work for dates that cross daylight saving time boundaries. – mskfisher Apr 29 '13 at 0:02
  • 1
    This is one of the better answers here because you (correctly) use the number of millis since the epoc to represent dates/times, and add amounts of millis for adjustments... Why then did you not keep this up for "addMonths"!? And why no add year? Did you get bored? – Robin Apr 23 '15 at 13:03
  • Other than months, time periods can be represented by static numbers. But months can be four different lengths. Also, any time period length from Days and higher may have variable length at DST, so you can't use time-based addition anymore without another level of complexity. I added the addYears(), and I fixed addMonths(). – Suamere Apr 16 '16 at 19:55
13

The simplest solution.

 Date.prototype.addDays = function(days) {
   this.setDate(this.getDate() + parseInt(days));
   return this;
 };

 // and then call

 var newDate = new Date().addDays(2); //+2 days
 console.log(newDate);

 // or

 var newDate1 = new Date().addDays(-2); //-2 days
 console.log(newDate1);

  • I think this is the best solution. If we're extending the Date class, then it makes better sense that the Date instance is itself updated. – Porlune Jun 13 '17 at 8:25
  • possible duplicate of this answer – Alex Jan 9 '18 at 11:20
9

Thanks Jason for your answer that works as expected, here is a mix from your code and the handy format of AnthonyWJones :

Date.prototype.addDays = function(days){
    var ms = new Date().getTime() + (86400000 * days);
    var added = new Date(ms);
    return added;
}
  • 6
    It does not take into account daylight saving when there's more or less than 86400000 seconds in a day and can result in logical error (program bug) in your code. – sbrbot Jan 12 '13 at 9:08
  • Sometimes that's needed. The eBay API has x-day auctions which are 24-hour based so your item will end at a different time than it goes up if DST status changes mid-auction. In that case you need to use this type of function to avoid logical errors. – Andy Novocin Jun 23 '14 at 15:17
8

Late to the party, but if you use jQuery then there's an excellent plugin called Moment:

http://momentjs.com/

var myDateOfNowPlusThreeDays = moment().add(3, "days").toDate();

http://momentjs.com/docs/#/manipulating/

And lots of other good stuff in there!

Edit: jQuery reference removed thanks to aikeru's comment

  • 1
    moment does not need jQuery :) – aikeru Oct 11 '14 at 3:51
  • Even better in that case!! – RemarkLima Oct 11 '14 at 8:10
  • 1
    Yes, after futzing around with Plain ol' JS for too long, I used Moment , and it just works(tm)! – caseyamcl Dec 9 '14 at 13:55
  • Why would you want to use plugin when a few lines of JS will do? – frenchie Feb 18 '16 at 21:25
  • @frenchie because, what starts as a few lines of JS and because clearly your application is manipulating days, dates and time related information, it'll soon be a few 1000 lines of JS, then you'll be asked to localise the app across 12 languages and timezones and you'd wished you had started out with something like moment ;) – RemarkLima Mar 5 '17 at 5:08
8

Without using the second variable, you can replace 7 with your next x days:

let d=new Date(new Date().getTime() + (7 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));
7

Old I know, but sometimes I like this:

function addDays(days) {
    return new Date(Date.now() + 864e5 * days);
}
  • 2
    This one makes the most sense to me. It's simple, elegant and doesn't fall pray to issues moving over months/years. – uadrive May 7 '15 at 4:17
  • 1
    Simplest answer presented. Building on this, the prototype 'addDays' would be the following: Date.prototype.addDays = function(days) {return new Date(this.getTime() + (864e5 * days));}; – CrazyIvan1974 Jun 3 '15 at 2:11
  • CrazyIvan1974 works flawlessly. – adamitj Jun 19 '17 at 22:27
  • Not every day has 24h, it fails for DST and leap seconds. – Stephan Aug 24 '17 at 13:01
6

The mozilla docs for setDate() don't indicate that it will handle end of month scenarios. See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date

setDate()

  • Sets the day of the month (1-31) for a specified date according to local time.

That is why I use setTime() when I need to add days.

  • I would link to the ECMAScript docs, but they are released in PDF ;( – Blake Mills Sep 28 '12 at 20:37
  • 1
    Re "mozilla docs for setDate() don't indicate that it will handle end of month scenarios". The "docs" have been updated so now they do. ;-) – RobG Dec 6 '16 at 23:15
6

I use something like:

new Date(dateObject.getTime() + amountOfDays * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000)

Works with day saving time:

new Date(new Date(2014, 2, 29, 20, 0, 0).getTime() + 1 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000)

Works with new year:

new Date(new Date(2014, 11, 31, 20, 0, 0).getTime() + 1 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000)

It can be parametrized:

function DateAdd(source, amount, step) {
  var factor = 1;
  if (step == "day") factor = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
  else if (step == "hour") factor = 60 * 60 * 1000;
  ...
  new Date(source.getTime() + amount * factor);
}
6

I guess I'll give an answer as well:
Personally, I like to attempt to avoid gratuitous variable declaration, method calls, and constructor calls, as they are all expensive on performance. (within reason, of course)
I was going to leave this as just comment under the Answer given by @AnthonyWJones but thought better of it.

// Prototype usage...
Date.prototype.addDays = Date.prototype.addDays || function( days ) {
    return this.setTime( 864E5 * days + this.valueOf() ) && this;
};

// Namespace usage...
namespace.addDaysToDate = function( date, days ) {
    return date.setTime( 864E5 * days + date.valueOf() ) && date;
};

// Basic Function declaration...
function addDaysToDate( date, days ) {
    return date.setTime( 864E5 * days + date.valueOf() ) && date;
};

The above will respect DST. Meaning if you add a number of days that cross DST, the displayed time (hour) will change to reflect that.
Example:
Nov 2, 2014 02:00 was the end of DST.

var dt = new Date( 2014, 10, 1, 10, 30, 0 );
console.log( dt );                  // Sat Nov 01 2014 10:30:00
console.log( dt.addDays( 10 ) );    // Tue Nov 11 2014 09:30:00

If you're looking to retain the time across DST (so 10:30 will still be 10:30)...

// Prototype usage...
Date.prototype.addDays = Date.prototype.addDays || function( days ) {
    return this.setDate( this.getDate() + days ) && this;
};

// Namespace usage...
namespace.addDaysToDate = function( date, days ) {
    return date.setDate( date.getDate() + days ) && date;
};

// Basic Function declaration...
function addDaysToDate( date, days ) {
    return date.setDate( date.getDate() + days ) && date;
};

So, now you have...

var dt = new Date( 2014, 10, 1, 10, 30, 0 );
console.log( dt );                  // Sat Nov 01 2014 10:30:00
console.log( dt.addDays( 10 ) );    // Tue Nov 11 2014 10:30:00
6

No, javascript has no a built in function, but you can use a simple line of code

timeObject.setDate(timeObject.getDate() + countOfDays);
6

I had issues with daylight savings time with the proposed solution.

By using getUTCDate / setUTCDate instead, I solved my issue.

// Curried, so that I can create helper functions like `add1Day`
const addDays = num => date => {
  // Make a working copy so we don't mutate the supplied date.
  const d = new Date(date);

  d.setUTCDate(d.getUTCDate() + num);

  return d;
}
  • this should be marked as the correct answer – Sérgio S. Filho Sep 8 '18 at 16:07
5

You can use JavaScript, no jQuery required:

var someDate = new Date();
var numberOfDaysToAdd = 6;
someDate.setDate(someDate.getDate() + numberOfDaysToAdd); 
Formatting to dd/mm/yyyy :

var dd = someDate.getDate();
var mm = someDate.getMonth() + 1;
var y = someDate.getFullYear();

var someFormattedDate = dd + '/'+ mm + '/'+ y;
4

I am using the following solution.

var msInDay = 86400000;
var daysToAdd = 5;
var now = new Date();
var milliseconds = now.getTime();
var newMillisecods = milliseconds + msInDay * daysToAdd;
var newDate = new Date(newMillisecods);
//or now.setTime(newMillisecods);

Date has a constructor that accepts an int. This argument represents total milliseconds before/after Jan 1, 1970. It also has a method setTime which does the same without creating a new Date object.

What we do here is convert days to milliseconds and add this value to the value provided by getTime. Finally, we give the result to Date(milliseconds) constructor or setTime(milliseconds) method.

  • Not every day has 24h, it fails for DST and leap seconds. – Stephan Aug 24 '17 at 13:00
  • Stephan, does any other library account for that? – Vakhtang Aug 24 '17 at 20:12
  • now.setDate(now.getDate() + days); automatically handles DST changes. And I have to correct, leap seconds are ignored in JS timestamps. – Stephan Aug 25 '17 at 7:57
4

Edit: Instead of setTime() (or setHours()) you could do it this way:

Date.prototype.addDays= function(d){
  this.setDate(this.getDate() + d);
  return this;
};

var tomorrow = new Date().addDays(1);

Old:

Instead of using setTime() you can use setHours():

Date.prototype.addDays= function(d){
    this.setHours(this.getHours() + d * 24);
    return this;
};

var tomorrow = new Date().addDays(1);

See the JSFiddle...

  • following this logic you could also add one day ;) d.setDate(d.getDate() + 1); – Rivenfall Feb 24 '16 at 17:43
  • so true. edited! – spaark Feb 26 '16 at 9:58
4

Very simple code to add days in date in java script.

var d = new Date();
d.setDate(d.getDate() + prompt('how many days you want to add write here'));
alert(d);

4

Generic prototype with no variables, it applies on an existing Date value:

Date.prototype.addDays = function (days) {
    return new Date(this.valueOf() + days * 864e5);
}
3

Our team considers date-fns the best library in this space. It treats dates as immutable (Moment.js will probably never adopt immutability), it's faster, and can be loaded modularly.

const newDate = DateFns.addDays(oldDate, 2);
3

There's a setDate and a getDate method, which allow you to do something like this :

var newDate = aDate.setDate(aDate.getDate() + numberOfDays);

If you want to both subtract a number of days and format your date in a human readable format, you should consider creating a custom DateHelper object that looks something like this :

var DateHelper = {
    addDays : function(aDate, numberOfDays) {
        aDate.setDate(aDate.getDate() + numberOfDays); // Add numberOfDays
        return aDate;                                  // Return the date
    },
    format : function format(date) {
        return [
           ("0" + date.getDate()).slice(-2),           // Get day and pad it with zeroes
           ("0" + (date.getMonth()+1)).slice(-2),      // Get month and pad it with zeroes
           date.getFullYear()                          // Get full year
        ].join('/');                                   // Glue the pieces together
    }
}

// With this helper, you can now just use one line of readable code to :
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------
// 1. Get the current date
// 2. Add 20 days
// 3. Format it
// 4. Output it
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------
document.body.innerHTML = DateHelper.format(DateHelper.addDays(new Date(), 20));

(see also this Fiddle)

3

to substract 30 days use

new Date(+yourDate - 30 *86400000)

var yourDate=new Date();
var d = new Date(+yourDate - 30 *86400000)

console.log(d)

2
    //the_day is 2013-12-31
    var the_day = Date.UTC(2013, 11, 31); 
    // Now, the_day will be "1388448000000" in UTC+8; 
    var the_next_day = new Date(the_day + 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
    // Now, the_next_day will be "Wed Jan 01 2014 08:00:00 GMT+0800"
  • I believe this wouldn't work with daylight saving times, leap seconds, or other timezone changes causing a day to not have 86400s. – Nicolas Cortot Dec 28 '13 at 16:29
  • This is the one that is correct. Date.UTC makes the difference. The only thing to that needs caution is that month starts from 0. – Devid Jan 24 '17 at 16:03
2

For those using Angular:

Just do:

$scope.booking.totTijd.setMinutes($scope.booking.totTijd.getMinutes()+15);
$scope.booking.totTijd.setDate($scope.booking.totTijd.getDate() + 1);

protected by Community Apr 14 at 20:01

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