5

I would like to know the difference between using Long.valueOf(0); or 0L. Are they the same?

I understand that both are Long types so they have a memory consumption of 64-bits long in Java 8.

So how it is better to initialize a variable, considering memory consumption and time complexity?

Long a = Long.valueOf(0);

or

Long b = 0L;

  • 3
    "I understand that both are Long types" - Long#valueOf returns an object of type Long, and 0L is a primitive long. – Jacob G. May 28 at 13:48
  • 1
    Long::value will give you an Object, 0L a primitive (that you can box via Long b = OL; - that internally will still use Long::valueOf) – Eugene May 28 at 13:48
  • 1
    Side note: in the range [-128,127] Long.valueOf(x) will return the same instance while every other primitive will cause a new instance to be created, i.e. you'll get a new Long(x) every time. – Thomas May 28 at 13:51
  • 1
    @Thomas, That's interesting.... Where can I read more about it? – lealceldeiro May 28 at 13:52
  • 2
    @lealceldeiro the JavaDoc and the source of valueOf() for Long, Integer, Short, Byte and Character tell you. :) Some more information can be found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/20897020/… – Thomas May 28 at 13:55
13

Nothing.

Long b = 0L;

will undergo autoboxing. The compiler replaces it with:

Long b = Long.valueOf(0L);

You can see this if you decompile your class, e.g. using javap.

void a() {
  Long a = Long.valueOf(0);
}

void b() {
  Long b = 0L;
}

Decompiles to:

  void a();
    Code:
       0: lconst_0
       1: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Long.valueOf:(J)Ljava/lang/Long;
       4: astore_1
       5: return

  void b();
    Code:
       0: lconst_0
       1: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Long.valueOf:(J)Ljava/lang/Long;
       4: astore_1
       5: return

So how it is better initialize a variable, considering memory consumption and time complexity?

Because they are semantically identical, the memory consumption and time complexity is also identical.

Instead, focus on what is actually important, which is readability: use the one you (and others) will find most easy to understand at a glance.

2

As others have pointed out, Long l = Long.valueOf(0) and Long l = 0L will compile to the same bytecode, the only difference is style and readability.

Additionally..

It's a bit silly to worry about time complexity for something like this: both expressions are constant time. You usually only talk about time complexity when acting on collections of data not just a single piece of data.

As for memory consumption, they do not use 64 bits as you say; It's the primitive long type that typically uses 64 bits but Long (the wrapper type) uses more memory than the primitive type because it needs that memory for object-related stuff.

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