I'd like to calculate a point on a quadratic curve. To use it with the canvas element of HTML5.

When I use the quadraticCurveTo() function in JavaScript, I have a source point, a target point and a control point.

How can I calculate a point on the created quadratic curve at let's say t=0.5 with "only" knowing this three points?

up vote 99 down vote accepted

Use the quadratic Bézier formula, found, for instance, on the Wikipedia page for Bézier Curves:

quadratic Bezier formula

In pseudo-code, that's

t = 0.5; // given example value
x = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * p[0].x + 2 * (1 - t) * t * p[1].x + t * t * p[2].x;
y = (1 - t) * (1 - t) * p[0].y + 2 * (1 - t) * t * p[1].y + t * t * p[2].y;

p[0] is the start point, p[1] is the control point, and p[2] is the end point. t is the parameter, which goes from 0 to 1.

  • 41
    yeah, great. Except for that I don't understand anything... – Christian Engel Apr 12 '11 at 12:06
  • 3
    Multiplying (adding) points in this case, means that you multiply (add) each component. That is, 3 P = [3 * P.x, 3 * p.y] and P1 + P2 = [P1.x + P2.x, P1.y + P2.y]. Finally, to square something, you multiply it with itself: x² = x * x. The last part, "t ∈ [1,0]", means that t is supposed to be between 0 and 1. – Markus Jarderot Apr 12 '11 at 12:38
  • 7
    So, this means: Point.x = (1-t)^2 * P0.x + 2 * (1-t) * t * P1.x + t^2 * P2.x; Point.y = (1-t)^2 * P0.y + 2 * (1-t) * t * P1.y + t^2 * P2.y; Tested and it works! =) Thank you! – Christian Engel Apr 12 '11 at 13:13
  • 4
    @xan: IMO you should have answered with some code (or pseudo-code) rather than mathematical notation since this is a programming question. – user336063 Dec 26 '13 at 23:01
  • 3
    @openfrog, t gives a fraction of where the point will be with respect to the starting and end point. It's the percentage of where it is assuming that the start and end point total 1, so t is usually a fraction. p0 is your starting point. p1 is your control/anchor point. p2 is your end point. – Razgriz Jan 6 '15 at 4:19

In case somebody needs the cubic form:

        //B(t) = (1-t)**3 p0 + 3(1 - t)**2 t P1 + 3(1-t)t**2 P2 + t**3 P3

        x = (1-t)*(1-t)*(1-t)*p0x + 3*(1-t)*(1-t)*t*p1x + 3*(1-t)*t*t*p2x + t*t*t*p3x;
        y = (1-t)*(1-t)*(1-t)*p0y + 3*(1-t)*(1-t)*t*p1y + 3*(1-t)*t*t*p2y + t*t*t*p3y;


In case somebody needs the nth form, here's the algorithm. You feed it N points and it will return an array of N + (N-1) + (N-2) ... points, this solves to (N * (N*1)) / 2. The last point is the position on the curve for the given value of T.

   9
  7 8
 4 5 6
0 1 2 3

You would feed the algorithm 0 1 2 3 as control points, and those positions would be the rest of the array. The last point (9) is the value you want.

This is also how you subdivide a bezier curve, you give it the value of t you want then you declare the subdivided curve as the sides of the pyramid. Then you index the various points at the side of the pyramid and the other side of the pyramid as built from the base. So for example in quintic:

    E
   C D
  9 A B 
 5 6 7 8
0 1 2 3 4

(Pardon the hex, I wanted it pretty)

You would index the two perfectly subdivided curves at 0, 5, 9, C, E and E, D, B, 8, 4. Take special note to see the first curve starts with a control point (0) and ends on a point on the curve (E) and the second curve starts on the curve (E) and ends on the control point (4) Given this you can perfectly subdivide a bezier curve, this is what you'd expect. The new control point linking the two curves is on the curve.

/**
 * Performs deCasteljau's algorithm for a bezier curve defined by the given control points.
 *
 * A cubic for example requires four points. So it should get at least an array of 8 values
 *
 * @param controlpoints (x,y) coord list of the Bezier curve.
 * @param returnArray Array to store the solved points. (can be null)
 * @param t Amount through the curve we are looking at.
 * @return returnArray
 */
public static float[] deCasteljau(float[] controlpoints, float[] returnArray, float t) {
    int m = controlpoints.length;
    int sizeRequired = (m/2) * ((m/2) + 1);
    if (returnArray == null) returnArray = new float[sizeRequired];
    if (sizeRequired > returnArray.length) returnArray = Arrays.copyOf(controlpoints, sizeRequired); //insure capacity
    else System.arraycopy(controlpoints,0,returnArray,0,controlpoints.length);
    int index = m; //start after the control points.
    int skip = m-2; //skip if first compare is the last control point.
    for (int i = 0, s = returnArray.length - 2; i < s; i+=2) {
        if (i == skip) {
            m = m - 2;
            skip += m;
            continue;
        }
        returnArray[index++] = (t * (returnArray[i + 2] - returnArray[i])) + returnArray[i];
        returnArray[index++] = (t * (returnArray[i + 3] - returnArray[i + 1])) + returnArray[i + 1];
    }
    return returnArray;
}

You'll notice it's just the formula for the amount through each set of points. For N solutions you get (N-1) midpoints at value (t) then from that you take the midpoints of those and get (N-2) points, then (N-3) points, etc until you have just one point. That point is on the curve. So solving the thing for values between 0, 1 for t, will give you the entire curve. Knowing this, my implementation there just propagates the values forward in an array saving recalculating anything more than once. I've used it for 100s of points and it's still lightning fast.

(in case you're wonder, no it's not really worth it. SVG is right to stop at cubic).

I created this demo :

// x = a * (1-t)³ + b * 3 * (1-t)²t + c * 3 * (1-t)t² + d * t³
//------------------------------------------------------------
// x = a - 3at + 3at² - at³ 
//       + 3bt - 6bt² + 3bt³
//             + 3ct² - 3ct³
//                    + dt³
//--------------------------------
// x = - at³  + 3bt³ - 3ct³ + dt³
//     + 3at² - 6bt² + 3ct²
//     - 3at + 3bt
//     + a
//--------------------------------
// 0 = t³ (-a+3b-3c+d) +  => A
//     t² (3a-6b+3c)   +  => B
//     t  (-3a+3b)     +  => c
//     a - x              => D
//--------------------------------

var A = d - 3*c + 3*b - a,
    B = 3*c - 6*b + 3*a,
    C = 3*b - 3*a,
    D = a-x;

// So we need to solve At³ + Bt² + Ct + D = 0 

Full example here

may help someone.

  • Your JSFiddle example doesn't actually show y for x. But I tried it anyway. And it worked 🎉 Converted to swift: gist.github.com/eonist/f5bb11533ee52ce24bad3ee47044239a THX! – eonist Mar 18 '17 at 16:34
  • @GitSyncApp its because the cubic function. it returns 3 answers that I used just first answer. see 1728.org/cubic.htm – talkhabi Mar 24 '17 at 11:34
  • Yeh, I know. But that was what I needed. Finding y for x on a cubic bezier graph. My point was that your fiddle is sort of scaled in the x-axis. Could be a browser thing ¯_(ツ)_/¯ It's awesome non the less. Kudos! – eonist Mar 24 '17 at 16:43

Just a note: If you are using the usual formulas presented here then don't expect t = 0.5 to return the point at half of the curve's length.. In most cases it won't.

More on this here under "§23 — Tracing a curve at fixed distance intervals" and here.

  • The curve's length is really hard to measure anyway. At t=0.5 you will on average if you assume random control points be at the center. But, do note that it has the same issue as most curves of varying speed. Finding the halfway point generally would requiring measuring parts of the curve and finding the center bit with a binary search. It's not exactly super typically needed. But, it is worthwhile to understand that if you find all points points at t=.1 increments they will not be equal in length. -- Though this has little to do with question and plenty to do with the nature of the curves. – Tatarize Sep 12 '16 at 23:04
  • 1
    @Tatarize: Mostly true, as also explained in the links provided. A very typical scenario would be a camera or a mesh movement along a path with constant speed... one will probably end up using polylines calculated from curves and using binary search... – A.J.Bauer Sep 13 '16 at 4:27

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.