5
#include <stdio.h>
void main() {
    {
        int x;
        printf("%p\n", &x);
    }
    {
        int x;
        printf("%p\n", &x);
    }
}

I would think running this that it would output the same thing twice. When it declares the first variable, it increments the stack pointer, but then leaves the scope, so it decrements it, and then just repeats the process the second time, so int x would occupy the same memory location on the stack both times.

But this isn't the case. The stack pointer is not decremented and int x in both cases occupy different locations in the stack. In fact, the first int x is still reachable even though its scope is gone.

#include <stdio.h>
void main() {
    {
        int x = 10;
        printf("%p\n", &x);
    }
    {
        int x = 25;
        printf("%p\n", &x);
    }
    {
        int x = 71;
        printf("%p\n", &x);

        int *p = &x;
        printf("%i %i %i\n", *(p + 2), *(p + 1), *p);
    }
}

Why is this? What am I misunderstanding?

  • 8
    Because it doesn't have to? Allocating all of the local variables at once is giving less performance overhead than moving it back and forth for every block. – Eugene Sh. May 28 at 19:34
  • 3
    C standard does not mention any stack. It's possible that enough memory is reserved on the stack at the start of the function. It's unusual to push and pop variables on demand: there is a stack frame. – Weather Vane May 28 at 19:36
  • 2
    It might behave differently with optimisations enabled, recycling locations in the stack frame. – Weather Vane May 28 at 19:38
  • 7
    Because what it does with the stack is none of your business. You may get different results with another compiler or with different compiler settings. – Henk Holterman May 28 at 19:38
  • 4
    @AmeliaHartman From the C programmer perspective these variables cease to exist, even though the memory might be still unused by anything else, so any reference to them will result in undefined behavior. – Eugene Sh. May 28 at 19:45
6

The C standard does not even mention a stack. The compiler is free to optimize variables away when they are not needed. There is absolutely nothing in the C standard that implies that the printouts should be neither equal or not equal.

On my computer, this manifests itself by giving different output depending on optimization level:

$ gcc c.c

/tmp$ ./a.out 
0x7ffd8733c3ac
0x7ffd8733c3a8

/tmp$ gcc c.c -O3

/tmp$ ./a.out 
0x7fff4e91544c
0x7fff4e91544c

In fact, the first "int x" is still reachable even though its scope is gone.

Accessing a variable that has gone out of scope causes undefined behavior, which means that anything can happen. This includes the case where the program works as intended.

Here is the output from your second snippet with different optimizations:

/tmp$ ./a.out 
0x7ffd4df94864
0x7ffd4df94860
0x7ffd4df9485c
10 25 71

/tmp$ gcc c.c -O3

/tmp$ ./a.out 
0x7ffc30b4e44c
0x7ffc30b4e44c
0x7ffc30b4e44c
0 0 71

When you get different behavior depending on optimization level, that's an almost 100% sign that your program has something that is causing undefined behavior. There is a very, very small chance that you have encountered a bug in the compiler. And apart from those two reasons, I cannot think of anything else that could be the cause.

  • In the C standard, “undefined behavior” does not mean anything can happen. It means the C standard imposes no requirements on the behavior. These are different things. – Eric Postpischil May 28 at 20:23
  • 4
    Which in turn means that the compiler is completely free to produce any code it wants, so yes, the resulting program can be anything, even if some scenarios are way more likely than others. Still, in the end it's basically the same. You destroy the predictability of the program. – klutt May 28 at 20:26
  • @EricPostpischil What could possibly be the practical difference? – klutt May 28 at 20:45
  • No, the resulting program cannot be anything. It is restricted by physics, logic, compiler specification, operating system specification, electrical safety regulations, and more. If “anything” could happen, then it would impossible to use the observed behavior to help figure out what went wrong. But experienced programmers learn to recognize symptoms and clues. One type of output suggests memory corruption, another suggests misinterpreted data, and so on. So that is one practical difference: “Anything” is not debuggable, but “not specified by C standard” is debuggable. – Eric Postpischil May 29 at 2:07
  • Another practical difference is that what is “undefined behavior” in the C standard may be a defined and supported language extension in a C implementation. For some extensions, using them requires you to write a program whose behavior is not defined by the standard. If the fact there were “undefined behavior” in the C standard’s meaning meant anything can happen, then the extension could not work—it could not be supported code. It is the fact that the C standard says it, and it alone, does not define the behavior that makes it possible to extend the C language so flexibly. – Eric Postpischil May 29 at 2:14
4

As a practical matter, when a stack does exist (as Broman's answer points out, there is no requirement for a stack to exist, although there is a requirement to support recursion) compilers will typically generate code that adjusts the stack pointer only once on function entry, and once again on function exit, even if there are sub-scopes within the function that limit individual variables' lifetimes.

This might seem bizarre if you're used to writing assembly language by hand. The most basic reason for it is, it means each variable that lives on the stack has a "stack slot" with a fixed location throughout the entire function, which gives the compiler maximum flexibility in moving machine instructions around for optimization.

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