47

I have a maven project with a module

/myProject
pom.xml
    /myModule
    pom.xml
       /foo
       bar.txt

Consider a Junit in myModule which needs to open bar.txt, with maven the basedir is the module directory.

So to open the file bar.txt :

  new File("foo/bar.txt")

This works well when you execute mvn test BUT when you launch the same junit in intellij, it fails because Intellij sets the basedir in the project directory, not the module directory.

Intellij tries to open myProject/foo/bar.txt instead of myProject/myModule/foo/bar.txt

Is there a way to deal with that ?

1

5 Answers 5

86

Solution inspired by Guillaume :

In Run->Edit configuration->Defaults->JUnit->Working directory set the value $MODULE_DIR$ and Intellij will set the relative path in all junits just like Maven.

8
  • Perfect! You have no idea how much time this has cost me and my team, where is this documented? Sep 23, 2011 at 1:46
  • 4
    nowhere, but now new version of Intellij suggests the MODULE_DIR value for the Working directory text field
    – tbruyelle
    Sep 23, 2011 at 7:25
  • classloading is so much better than file... using filesystem is evil
    – ianpojman
    Jun 23, 2012 at 2:48
  • 1
    Using filesystem is evil? And where do you think the eventual file comes from??? In some cases, e.g. when using a C.I. Server you might want to specify source config files to be used in your test cases that don't exist in your artifact. Please enlighten me how I am supposed to get to them not using the evil file system. Thank you.
    – Lawrence
    Jul 12, 2013 at 12:04
  • 3
    Be aware that this alters your default JUnit launch configuration. Therefore, it won't alter any configurations that you already have created. If this solution doesn't work for you, double check which configuration you are actually using and whether it has inherited this value correctly. Feb 21, 2014 at 11:15
25

If you want to keep your code, you can try to change the working directory in the run/debug configuration (first entry in the combo box giving access to what you want to run) Set this to your module root. But prefer the other suggested approach:

ClassLoader.getSystemResourceAsStream(youPath) 

Or my preferred:

getClass.getResource(youPath)

or

getClass.getResourceAsStream(youPath)

A leading '/' in path indicates the working dir of your project, while no '/' indicates a relative dir to current class.

I use this last solution for my tests: I put my test data resources at the same package level as the test source, or in a subdir to avoid too messy package.

This way I can do a simple call without complicated path and without having to deal with working directory:

project-root  
  - module A  
    - src  
      - test
        - rootfile.txt  
        - my-complicated-package-naming-root
          - mypackage
            - Test.java
            - testResource.xml  

I can get the files this way:

final URL rootfile= Test.class.getResource("/rootfile.txt");
final URL testResource= Test.class.getResource("testResource.xml");
3
  • I set the junit working directory to $MODULE_DIR$ and it works as expected. Unfortunatly it's not possible to use this variable in default junit configuration ! What a shame...
    – tbruyelle
    Apr 12, 2011 at 16:19
  • $MODULE_DIR$ isn't suggested in the default junit configuration, but you can force the value in the "working configuration" field avec it works!
    – tbruyelle
    Apr 12, 2011 at 16:41
  • @iangreen: Are you really sure it's the case - would You mind quoting docs?
    – Rekin
    May 9, 2013 at 20:29
12

a) Don't use Files, use InputStreams. get your InputStream via

ClassLoader.getSystemResourceAsStream("foo/bar.xml")

Most APIs that deal with Files are happy with InputStreams as well.

b) Don't use foo directories, use directories both maven and your IDE know about (i.e. put them in src/main/resources or src/test/resources, so they are on the Class Path)

c) If you have an API that absolutely needs a File, not an InputStream, you can still do

new File(ClassLoader.getSystemResource("foo/bar.xml").toURI())
2
  • be careful if you are using groovy in your project: ClassLoader.getSystemResourceAsStream can stop working (return always null) because intellij starts to use a command line wrapper / dynamic proxy. See to disable this feature jguru.com/faq/view.jsp?EID=1533847. I've lost so many hours trying to figure what was happening...
    – Guillaume
    Apr 12, 2011 at 15:50
  • Thanks I'm aware of those stuff, but I need to retrieve a File which can't be in the classpath because its path is configured in some parameters. I really need a solution with relative path.
    – tbruyelle
    Apr 12, 2011 at 15:54
2

You can specify the working directory for the test runner in the Run/Debug Configurations window:

enter image description here

0

Solution from @tbruyelle works if you keep your project files(.idea) in the same directory as the source code. If you choose Keep Project files in ... in a different location, then $MODULE_DIR$ is trying to look up in the workspace directory and the paths cannot be found. This looks like a bug on IntelliJ, hope they fix it soon.

Workaround: You can specify absolute / relative path of the maven module in working directory

$MODULE_DIR$/../master/mavenmodule1

$MODULE_DIR$: points to workspace directory
../: relative path to source code
master: root directory of your source code
mavenmodule1: maven module name / directory name of the child module.

For multi module maven project you don't have a choice, you need to have a different run configurations pointing to that module. I wish there is another variable that points just to the $MAVEN_MODULE$ ($MODULE_DIR$/../master/$MAVEN_MODULE$) so we can use this configuration for all modules. For the above example, $MAVEN_MODULE$ will be substituted with mavenmodule1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.