13

I recently saw a tweet stating that you could prevent other developers from reading from a table using the SELECT * FROM TableName by building your table in the following way:

CREATE TABLE [TableName]
(
   [ID] INT IDENTITY NOT NULL,
   [Name] VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
   [DontUseStar] AS (1 / 0)
);

It's easy to see that using the SELECT * here would try to read the blank column name as 1 divided by 0 (thus causing a divide by zero error), but without a datatype assigned to the column.

Why does SQL allow you to create a column with no assigned data type, with a name it knows will be illegal?

4
  • 4
    This computed column has a data type and it is integer because underlying expression (integer divided by integer) is integer. – Piotr May 30 '19 at 16:26
  • The name isn't illegal; the value is. – R.J. Dunnill May 30 '19 at 16:28
  • 1
    There's nothing "illegal" about the column. As detailed below, it's a perfectly acceptable computed column that will always throw an error at run time, which is when the computation takes place. Fascinating, though. – Eric Brandt May 30 '19 at 16:38
  • RunTime is the key here, as @EricBrandt explained. – scsimon May 30 '19 at 16:47
10

It a perfectly valid syntax for a computed column. Computed columns can be used to calculate some value on select without actually storing them, although the value can be persisted.

The reason why 1/0 is allowed, is because the actual computed column value not evaluated until runtime. For example the computed column can be defined as columna/columnb, the same error will occur if any row in columnb has a 0 and is , but only if that row/column was selected.

if object_id('tempdb..#t') IS NOT NULL
    drop table #t;

CREATE TABLE #t 
(a int
,b int
,div as (a/b)
);

INSERT INTO #t
values 
(1,1)
,(2,0);

SELECT * FROM #t WHERE a = 1;
SELECT a from #t; -- NO ERRORS

SELECT * FROM #t WHERE a=2; --WILL RESULT IN AN ERROR
SELECT * FROM #t; --WILL RESULT IN AN ERROR

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/tables/specify-computed-columns-in-a-table?view=sql-server-2017

7

What you have created is a computed column and it is quite powerful and useful!

The expression can be anything. For instance, you could define:

CREATE TABLE [TableName] (
   [ID] INT IDENTITY NOT NULL,
   [Name] VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
   NameLength as (LEN(Name))
);

This would create a column called NameLength and it would always have the length of Name when you refer to it -- no updates, no triggers, no views. It just works.

You don't need a type because SQL Server can figure that out.

The error that you have can even be beneficial -- if you really want to enforce that users never use select *.

-1

I think it's a greate way to create a table which allows no rows to be selected select * from . Why one may need such a table? Who knows, probably to wire a INSTEAD OF trigger to it or something. Any programming language will allow the code like x=1/0, it's not a compiler business to decide why one needs it.

4
  • allows no rows? Can you elaborate – scsimon May 30 '19 at 16:33
  • @scsimon correted , no rows can be selected – Serg May 30 '19 at 16:35
  • 1
    But they can, as long as you list the columns explicitly... excluding the computed columns of course – scsimon May 30 '19 at 16:35
  • 1
    I'm not flagging it, but this is really a comment, not an answer. – Eric Brandt May 30 '19 at 16:40

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