80

Windows and macOS now have dark mode.

For CSS I can use:

    @media (prefers-dark-interface) { 
      color: white; background: black 
    }

But I am using the Stripe Elements API, which puts colors in JavaScript

For example:

  const stripeElementStyles = {
    base: {
      color: COLORS.darkGrey,
      fontFamily: `-apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, "Segoe UI", Roboto, "Helvetica Neue", Arial, "Noto Sans", sans-serif, "Apple Color Emoji", "Segoe UI Emoji", "Segoe UI Symbol", "Noto Color Emoji"`,
      fontSize: '18px',
      fontSmoothing: 'antialiased',
      '::placeholder': {
        color: COLORS.midgrey
      },
      ':-webkit-autofill': {
        color: COLORS.icyWhite
      }
    }
  }

How can I detect the OS's preferred color scheme in JavaScript?

163
if (window.matchMedia && window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)').matches) {
    // dark mode
}

To watch for changes:

window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)').addEventListener('change', e => {
    const newColorScheme = e.matches ? "dark" : "light";
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Note that this only works when you actually execute the code, but not automatically when the user changes the mode manually or it is changed by the system automatically. – Daniel Jan 29 at 20:11
  • 1
    @Daniel Pretty obvious since it doesn't seem to be an event an just a property of the window object. – Muhammad bin Yusrat Feb 20 at 10:42
  • 31
    I'll just leaver this here: window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)').addEventListener('change', function(e) { console.log('changed!!');}) – Jaromanda X Mar 6 at 3:05
  • Note that prefers-color-scheme: dark does not seem to work in Edge. Not in CSS or Javasript. – VDWWD Jun 7 at 12:08
  • @VDWWD old Edge or new Edge (Chromium-based)? – Mark Szabo Jun 7 at 13:16
8

According to MediaQueryList - Web APIs | MDN, addListener is the correct way to listen to the change. addEventListener is not working for me on iOS 13.4.

window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)').addListener(function (e) {
  console.log(`changed to ${e.matches ? "dark" : "light"} mode`)
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Also from MDN - This is basically an alias for EventTarget.addEventListener(), for backwards compatibility purposes. – Gerrit0 Jun 21 at 22:08
7

You can check the CSS Media-Queries directly with Javascript

The window.matchMedia() method returns a MediaQueryList object representing the results of the specified CSS media query string. The value of the matchMedia() method can be any of the media features of the CSS @media rule, like min-height, min-width, orientation, etc.

To check if the Media-Query is true the matches property can be used

// Check to see if Media-Queries are supported
if (window.matchMedia) {
  // Check if the dark-mode Media-Query matches
  if(window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)').matches){
    // Dark
  } else {
    // Light
  }
} else {
  // Default (when Media-Queries are not supported)
}

To update the color-scheme dynamically if the user would change their preference the following can be used:

function setColorScheme(scheme) {
  switch(scheme){
    case 'dark':
      // Dark
      break;
    case 'light':
      // Light
      break;
    default:
      // Default
      break;
  }
}

function getPreferredColorScheme() {
  if (window.matchMedia) {
    if(window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)').matches){
      return 'dark';
    } else {
      return 'light';
    }
  }
  return 'light';
}

if(window.matchMedia){
  var colorSchemeQuery = window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)');
  colorSchemeQuery.addEventListener('change', setColorScheme(getPreferedColorScheme()));
}
| improve this answer | |

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