5

I'd like some suggestions for the most terse and 'functional' way to gather pairs of successive elements from a vector (1st and 2nd, 3rd and 4th, etc.) using modern C++. Assume the vector is of arbitrary but even length. For the examples I'm pulling together, I'm summing the elements of each pair but that's not the main problem. I should add I'll use STL only, no Boost.

In Python I can zip them into 2-tuples via an iterator with

s = range(1,11)
print([(x + y) for x,y in zip(*[iter(s)] * 2)])

In Perl 5 I can peel off pairs with

use List::Util qw/pairs sum/;
use feature 'say';
@s = 1 .. 10;
say sum @$_ foreach (pairs @s);

In Perl 6 I can shove them two at a time into a block with

my @s = 1 .. 10;
for @s -> $x, $y { say $x + $y; }

and in R I can wrap the vector into a 2-column array and sum the rows with

s <- 1:10
print(apply(matrix(s, ncol=2, byrow=TRUE), 1, sum))

I am not fluent in C++ and my solution uses for(;;). That feels too much like C.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>  // std::iota

int main() {
    std::vector<int> s(10);
    std::iota(s.begin(), s.end(), 1);
    for (auto p = s.cbegin(); p != s.cend(); p += 2)
        std::cout << (*p + *(p + 1)) << std::endl;
}

The output of course should be some variant of

3
7
11
15
19
7

Using range-v3:

for (auto v : view::iota(1, 11) | view::chunk(2)) {
    std::cout << v[0] + v[1] << '\n';
}   

Note that chunk(2) doesn't give you a compile-time-fixed size view, so you can't do:

for (auto [x,y] : view::iota(1, 11) | view::chunk(2)) { ... }
  • This is great, seems perfect, but is ranges-v3 part of a standard or due to be? I'd like students to be able to compile the solution directly without installing something extra. – Douglas Scofield May 31 at 16:28
  • 1
    @DouglasScofield Parts of it will be in C++20 (including iota) but most of it will not be (including chunk) – Barry May 31 at 16:30
0

Without using range-v3 I was able to do this with either a function or a lambda template. I'll show the lambda version here.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

template<typename T>
auto lambda = [](const std::vector<T>& values, std::vector<T>& results) {
    std::vector<T> temp1, temp2;

    for ( std::size_t i = 0; i < values.size(); i++ ) {
        if ( i & 1 ) temp2.push_back(values[i]); // odd index
        else temp1.push_back(values[i]); // even index
    }

    for ( std::size_t i = 0; i < values.size() / 2; i++ )
        results.push_back(temp[i] + temp[2]);
};

int main() {
    std::vector<int> values{ 1,2,3,4,5,6 };
    for (auto i : values)
        std::cout << i << " ";
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<int> results;
    lambda<int>(values, results);
    for (auto i : results)
        std::cout << i << " ";
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<float> values2{ 1.1f, 2.2f, 3.3f, 4.4f };
    for (auto f : values2)
        std::cout << f << " ";
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<float> results2;
    lambda<float>(values2, results2);
    for (auto f : results2)
        std::cout << f << " ";
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<char> values3{ 'a', 'd' };
    for (auto c : values3)
        std::cout << c << " ";
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<char> results3;
    lambda<char>(values3, results3);
    for (auto c : results3)
        std::cout << c << " ";
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<std::string> values4{ "Hello", " ", "World", "!" };
    for (auto s : values4)
        std::cout << s;
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<std::string> results4;
    lambda<std::string>(values4, results4);
    for (auto s : results4)
        std::cout << s;
    std::cout << '\n';

   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Output

1 2 3 4 5 6
3 7 11
1.1 2.2 3.3 4.4
3.3 7.7
a d
┼
Hello World!
Hello World!
  • 1
    @JeJo That's highly possible and even with c++20 in the works; it will still only be partially supported. Only time will tell. – Francis Cugler Jun 1 at 18:11
0

At the risk of sounding like I'm trying to be clever or annoying, I say this is the answer:

print(sums(successive_pairs(range(1,11))));

Now, of course, those aren't built-in functions, so you would have to define them, but I don't think that is a bad thing. The code clearly expresses what you want in a functional style. Also, the responsibility of each of those functions is well separated, easily testable, and reusable. It isn't necessary to use a lot of tricky specialized syntax to write code in a functional style.

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