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I have a mixed list with strings and ints and I need to get to the sum of the numbers between each strings. Ideally the end result would be a list of tuples since each string and following numbers belong together (so order is important).

I can extract the number with iteration using isinstance but the actual list is very large and I sometimes I have 1 or 2 numbers for each string.

my_list = ['a', 2, 1, 'b', 3, 'h', 50, 4, 'd', 4, 'v', 20, 7]

ideal_output = [('a', 3) ('b', 3), ('h', 54), ('d', 4), (v, 27)]

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Here's a solution using itertools.groupby:

my_list = ['a', 2, 1, 'b', 3, 'h', 50, 4, 'd', 4, 'v', 20, 7]

from itertools import groupby

groups = groupby(my_list, key=type) # group-by the type of the value

result = []
for key, group in groups:
    string = next(group) # get the string first, we'll skip over it otherwise
    if key is str:
        _, values = next(groups) # move the generator forward to get to the numbers
        result.append((string, sum(values))) # sum up the numbers
print(result)

Output:

[('a', 3), ('b', 3), ('h', 54), ('d', 4), ('v', 27)]

It does assume that there will be at least one number between the strings. If not you can check on the len of g and if that's more than 1, add a 0 for the value of the first value in g

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    I'm not sure why you have the if k is str. k is always going to be a string. – DeepSpace Jun 1 '19 at 20:09
  • Good solution, but your single-letter variable names are killing me. And s = list(g)[0] can we simplified to s = next(g). – Aran-Fey Jun 1 '19 at 20:09
  • @DeepSpace Force of habit - need to validate inputs :) – rdas Jun 1 '19 at 20:10
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You can just use simple iteration as well without groupby, this will be slightly faster because it only does one pass:

my_list = ['a', 2, 1, 'b', 3, 'h', 50, 4, 'd', 4, 'v', 20, 7]
new_list = []
new_element = []
for element in my_list:
    if isinstance(element, str):
        if new_element:
            new_list.append(tuple(new_element))
        new_element = [element, 0]
    else:
        new_element[1] += element
if new_element:
    new_list.append(new_element)
print(new_list)

Output:

[('a', 3), ('b', 3), ('h', 54), ('d', 4), ('v', 27)]
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  • Thank you! This also works well for my actual case. – Mike_Pike Jun 2 '19 at 8:39
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With functools.reduce function:

from functools import reduce

def accum(prev, curr):    # prev - previous item, curr - current item
    if prev == [] or isinstance(curr, str):
        prev.append((curr, 0))
    elif isinstance(curr, int):
        prev[-1] = (prev[-1][0], prev[-1][1] + curr)
    return prev

my_list = ['a', 2, 1, 'b', 3, 'h', 50, 4, 'd', 4, 'v', 20, 7]
res = reduce(accum, my_list, [])   # [] is initializer
print(res)

The output:

[('a', 3), ('b', 3), ('h', 54), ('d', 4), ('v', 27)]
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  • Thanks! Didn't think of functools. Interesting approach. – Mike_Pike Jun 2 '19 at 8:41

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