-3
#include <stdio.h>

struct student
{
  int roll_no;
  int mark;
  struct student *p;
};

int main()
{
  struct student *stu;
  stu = malloc(sizeof(struct student));
}

What is the actual return value of malloc() for a structure type? How is it being assigned to the structure variable?

Now for the statement,

struct student *stu;

Memory allocation like stu with 4 bytes lets just say starting from 1000.

And for the statement

stu = malloc(sizeof(struct student));

First allocates block of memory, let's just say 2000 - 2012. Then the assignment part a pointer to 2000 stored at 1000.

This is how the assignment part works for malloc() and structure variable.

And now pointer i.e stu holding the starting address 2000. So now stu->roll_no will access the 1st 4 bytes and stu->mark will access the next 4 bytes and so on. The question is how does the compiler understand it, it's not like stu->roll_no is equivalent to *(stu+0) and stu->mark is equivalent to *(stu+1). Explanation to this will be much appreciated.

4
  • Struct student *stu; doesn't allocate anything but the pointer. – HolyBlackCat Jun 2 '19 at 17:14
  • Thanks for the precise answer. Now lets say Block of Memory(BOM) be from 2000 to 2012. Pointer i.e the stu holding the starting adr 2000. So now stu->roll_no will acess the 1st 4 bytes and stu->mark will access the next 4 bytes and so on. The question is how does the compiler will understand it, Its not like stu->roll_no is equivalent to *(stu+0) and stu->mark is equivalent to *(stu+1). Explanation to this will be much appreciated. – Praveen Kumar Karthikeyan Jun 3 '19 at 5:00
  • You didn't got the syntax right, but the compiler will indeed simply add some offset to the pointer and dereference it. stu->mark could be something like *((int *)stu + 1). – HolyBlackCat Jun 3 '19 at 13:12
  • Thank you for ur valuable time. – Praveen Kumar Karthikeyan Jun 6 '19 at 12:58
0

malloc() returns a pointer to a block of memory (void *) large enough to hold size (first argument) bytes regardless of what the argument is or what the result is being casted to.

For example, stu->roll_no would access the first four bytes (assuming int is 32-bit) of the allocated memory (assuming that the structure is not padded).

In C, void * pointers are implicitly converted into the pointer type of what they are assigned to.

Your understanding is correct except for this statement:

And for clarity sake, unlike a normal structure variable which will allocate 12 bytes for the struct student whereas a structure pointer variable allocates just 4 bytes.

The pointer to the structure is allocated on the stack in this case and the structure itself is allocated on the heap. If you had used a structure directly, it would allocate 12 bytes on the stack and no bytes on the heap.

You're correct on this:

it's not like stu->roll_no is equivalent to *(stu+0) and stu->mark is equivalent to *(stu+1)

stu->roll_no is equivalent to *((int *)stu+0) and stu->mark is equivalent to *((int *)stu+1). Note the casts to int *.

0
-1

malloc return void * pointer to a place in the memory in size you sent it that you can cast to any - https://www.tutorialspoint.com/cprogramming/c_type_casting.htm type you want see malloc definition : https://www.tutorialspoint.com/c_standard_library/c_function_malloc.htm

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