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Hello everyone I am making a Cocos2d-x game which includes gradle files I was looking for ways to improve my build time and I tried googling and even looking at Gradle docs but I just can't seem to understand what exactly a "decoupled" project is ? In my gradle.properties it states this

# When configured, Gradle will run in incubating parallel mode.
# This option should only be used with decoupled projects. More details, visit
# http://www.gradle.org/docs/current/userguide/multi_project_builds.html#sec:decoupled_projects
#org.gradle.parallel=true

for people who are not familiar with Cocos2d-x in the Gradle Scripts folder in Android Studio Cocos2d-x project it has 3 build.gradle files:

  • (Project: proj.android)
  • (Module: MyGame)
  • (Module: libcocos2dx)

followed by gradle-wrapper.properties, proguard-rules.pro(MyGame), proguard-rules.pro(libcocos2dx), gradle.properties, settings.gradle & local.properties

with all this being said is my project considered a decoupled project ? and would uncommenting org.gradle.parallel=true improve build time or what exactly different would I notice ?

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Check list of projects for an app by running following command.

gradlew -q projects

It's output will be like this

------------------------------------------------------------
Root project
------------------------------------------------------------

Root project 'MyApplication'
+--- Project ':app'
\--- Project ':mylibrary'

As per the gradle link

Two projects are said to be decoupled if they do not directly access each other’s project model. Decoupled projects may only interact in terms of declared dependencies: project dependencies and/or task dependencies. Any other form of project interaction (i.e. by modifying another project object or by reading a value from another project object) causes the projects to be coupled.

If app is using dependency like

dependencies {

    implementation project(":mylibrary")
}

Then it is decoupled.

  • thanks solved my question ! – isJulian00 Jun 3 at 19:26

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