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I am writing an application that is used at a call center. Whenever a phone call lands on a workstation, I need to create a set of objects (maybe about 30). I want those objects only to exist for the duration of the phone call because they contain state, and I think it makes more sense to create new objects than to try and reset their state each time a call lands. At the time of creation of these objects, it must perform some async activity such as establishing multiple sockets to other applications and sending messages to them. When the phone call ends, it must do more async operations such as sending end call messages and then closing the sockets.

I have been looking into the AsyncScopedLifestyle functionality of SimpleInjector. Here is a simplified example of how I think I would use it:

    class CallTaskFactory
    {
        private Container Container;
        public CallTaskFactory(Container container)
        {
            Container = container;
        }

        public async Task CreateCallTask()
        {
            using (Scope scope = AsyncScopedLifestyle.BeginScope(Container))
            {
                // Get the socket's destination
                SocketDestinationProvider socketDestProvider = Container.GetInstance<SocketDestinationProvider>();
                EndPoint ep = await socketDestProvider.GetSocketDestination();

                // Now create a socket and connect to that destination
                Socket socket = Container.GetInstance<Socket>();
                await socket.ConnectAsync(ep);

                // Send a simple message on the socket
                var Sender1 = Container.GetInstance<MessageSender1>();
                await Sender1.SendStartMessage();

                // Send another message, and the response tells us whether we need to create some object
                // that does something on a timer
                var Sender2 = Container.GetInstance<MessageSender2>();
                var Response = await Sender2.SendStartMessageAndAwaitResponse();
                if (Response.Result)
                {
                    Container.GetInstance<ClassThatChecksSomethingOnATimer>();
                }

                // The call stays active until the socket closes
                TaskCompletionSource<int> Completion = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();
                socket.Closed += (sender, e) => { Completion.TrySetResult(0); };
                await Completion.Task;

                // Clean up
                await Sender2.SendStopMessage();
                await Sender1.SendStopMessage();
                await socket.DisconnectAsync();
            }
        } 

I am not sure I am putting it in the correct place, though. I assume this factory class would have to exist inside my composition root, because it references a specific DI container. But to me the composition root is for composing an object graph only, and generally it doesn't have logic that uses those objects, as the above code does. How can I create a set of objects in one place and consume them in another, and then destroy them when their work is done?

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I assume this factory class would have to exist inside my composition root, because it references a specific DI container.

Absolutely. Only the Composition Root should refer to the container. This typically means you need to introduce an abstraction. This allows you to implement the adapter logic that depends on the DI Container inside your Composition Root, while the application code can take a dependency on its abstraction.

But to me the composition root is for composing an object graph only, and generally it doesn't have logic that uses those objects, as the above code does.

You should prevent placing business logic inside the Composition Root. The Composition Root is part of the applicaiton's infrastructure. That doesn't mean, though, that it can only compose object graphs. It is allowed to invoke the created object graph. It would be pretty hard to do anything useful if it wasn't allowed to act on the composed object graph.

How can I create a set of objects in one place and consume them in another, and then destroy them when their work is done?

To solve this problem, you should try to attack this from a different angle. Your Composition Root should ideally only have a single call to GetInstance and a single method call on the resolved object(s). This can generally be achieved by wrapping all the code in a new class. The resolved dependencies will be promoted to constructor arguments in the new class.

When you apply this technique to your code, you'd end up with something like this:

public class CallExecutor {
    ...        
    public CallExecutor(
        SocketDestinationProvider socketDestinationProvider, Socket socket,
        MessageSender1 messageSender1, MessageSender2 messageSender2,
        ClassThatChecksSomethingOnATimer checker)
    {
        this.socketDestinationProvider = socketDestinationProvider;
        this.socket = socket;
        this.messageSender1 = messageSender1;
        this.messageSender2 = messageSender2;
        this.checker = checker;
    }

    public async Task Call()
    {
        EndPoint ep = await this.socketDestProvider.GetSocketDestination();
        await this.socket.ConnectAsync(ep);
        await this.sender1.SendStartMessage();
        var response = await this.sSender2.SendStartMessageAndAwaitResponse();
        if (response.Result)
        {
            this.checker.DoSomething(...)
        }

        TaskCompletionSource<int> Completion = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();
        socket.Closed += (sender, e) => { Completion.TrySetResult(0); };
        await Completion.Task;

        await this.sender2.SendStopMessage();
        await this.sender1.SendStopMessage();
        await this.socket.DisconnectAsync();        
    }
}

In the above code, I did a simple one-to-one convertion. Every resolve became a constructor dependency. This might not be correct in all cases. I can imagine, for instance, that you want to resolve multiple Socket instances from the container. Do note, however, that a Socket seems more like runtime data to me. You might want to consider to refrain using the Container to resolve objects like these (as is alluded in this article).

This new CallExecutor class can be defined completely as application code; there's no dependency on the DI Container. The remaining code of the CallTaskFactory is so short, that it can easily be implemented inside your Composition Root:

class CallTaskFactory : ICallTaskFactory
{
    private Container container;

    public CallTaskFactory(Container container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }

    public async Task CreateCallTask()
    {
        using (AsyncScopedLifestyle.BeginScope(this.container))
        {
            await this.container.GetInstance<CallExecutor>().Call();
        }
    }
}

Of course, the introduction of the CallExecutor, however, did cause all dependencies to be created eagerly. This might seem inefficient, but shouldn't be the case, because object composition should be fast, so you can compose your graphs with confidence.

  • I like the CallExecutor class, but even as it stands, seeing 5 constructor parameters seems like too many, and that's just in the code I simplified for posting here. The real version has about 30 components, and it constantly changes every time a new call processing feature gets added. Could I create a parameter class with all of these components in it, so the constructor just has one parameter? Or maybe the CallExecutor constructor could take an IEnumerable of call components, each one with a StartAsync and a StopAsync method? – Rob L Jun 3 at 17:54
  • Big classes are a design smell; a single responsibility principle violation. Reverting to the Service Locator anti-pattern will not help. The solution is to find the right design that will combat this "constantly changing" class. The open/closed principle pushes us towards a design where new functionality can be added, without changing existing code. Not an easy task, but a worthwhile goal to achieve. – Steven Jun 3 at 18:05
  • Yeah, the SRP violation is really the crux of my problem. But I cannot avoid the fact that 30 different things need to happen when a call starts - that's just a system requirement. I considered making them events so I could just add more as needed, but most of them are async and I need to await their tasks because if any of them fails, the phone call needs to end. – Rob L Jun 3 at 18:39
  • Try using Aggregate Services or a Composite. – Steven Jun 3 at 19:12
  • I tried using a composite, and it was close. But I struggled with making sure the components executed in the right order. For example, sending message A over the socket needs to happen before sending message B, so those components have to be executed in sequence. But other components have nothing to do with a socket, so those I'd like to execute in parallel. I ended up making a Workflow class, which executes the components mostly in parallel, but can be told when a component needs to wait for another component's completion before executing. Do you see any problems with this technique? – Rob L Jun 5 at 19:28

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