5

I have a dataframe like this:

df = pd.DataFrame({'keys': list('aaaabbbbccccc'), 'values': [1, 5, 6, 8, 2, 4, 7, 7, 1, 1, 1, 1, 5]})

   keys  values
0     a       1
1     a       5
2     a       6
3     a       8
4     b       2
5     b       4
6     b       7
7     b       7
8     c       1
9     c       1
10    c       1
11    c       1
12    c       5

Further, I have a variable max_sum = 10.

I want to assign a group to each row (i) based on the value in keys and (ii) the max_sum which should not be exceeded per group.

My expected outcome looks like this:

   keys  values  group
0     a       1      1
1     a       5      1
2     a       6      2
3     a       8      3
4     b       2      4
5     b       4      4
6     b       7      5
7     b       7      6
8     c       1      7
9     c       1      7
10    c       1      7
11    c       1      7
12    c       5      7

So, the first two values in the a group (1 and 5) sum up to 6 which is less than 10, so they are in the same group. If we now added also 6, max_sum would be exceeded and therefore this value goes into group 2. We cannot add 8 to this group as then again max_sum would be exceeded, therefore we define a group 3. Same then for the values b and c.

One can do

df['cumsum'] = df.groupby('keys')['values'].cumsum()

   keys  values  cumsum
0     a       1       1
1     a       5       6
2     a       6      12
3     a       8      20
4     b       2       2
5     b       4       6
6     b       7      13
7     b       7      20
8     c       1       1
9     c       1       2
10    c       1       3
11    c       1       4
12    c       5       9

but I don't know how to get the group info from this.

  • Just checking, does df.groupby('keys')['values'].cumsum().mod(max_sum).groupby(df['keys']).diff().fillna(-1).lt(0).cumsum() do what you want? – cs95 Jun 3 at 21:41
  • 1
    @cs95: that looks exactly as the group column, so I guess it does; now I only have to understand this line :) Please add it as an answer! – Cleb Jun 3 at 21:43
3

We can create two masks, and based on that create a True / False array.

  • m1: All values which are greater then max_sum mark as True else False
  • m2: Rows where the value in previous row keys is not the same as current row.

With np.where we basically have the following in Pseudo code:

when m1 or m2 is True, return True, else False

Now we can translate True and False to 1 / 0 since they are booleans:

True + True

2

That's the reaon for cumsum in the last line.

Code:

max_sum = 10

m1 = df.groupby('keys')['values'].cumsum().gt(max_sum)  # all values which are greater than max_sum 
m2 = df['keys'].ne(df['keys'].shift())                  # all rows where keys change

df['group'] = np.where(m1 | m2, True, False).cumsum()


   keys  values  group
0     a       1      1
1     a       5      1
2     a       6      2
3     a       8      3
4     b       2      4
5     b       4      4
6     b       7      5
7     b       7      6
8     c       1      7
9     c       1      7
10    c       1      7
11    c       1      7
12    c       5      7
  • Interesting, I like this answer. – cs95 Jun 3 at 21:45
  • I think you are missing the creation of "cumsum" but I have an idea how you created that. – cs95 Jun 3 at 21:46
  • Very nice idea! i have to go through it to fully understand, so I upvote for now and then accept later on depending on the other answers. – Cleb Jun 3 at 21:46
  • 1
    yes that worked, thanks a lot! @cs95 – Erfan Jun 3 at 21:56
  • 1
    No worries at all, glad we could help out and share knowledge. He deserves the points more than me! So does wenben! happy coding @Cleb – Erfan Jun 3 at 22:01
6

We want to partition rows based on their cumulative sum, so we use cumsum, take the modulus with respect to max_sum, then find the difference to find points where the difference is negative (to mark the next group). We also need to do this per key, so the entire operation described above is done inside a GroupBy.apply call.

(df.groupby('keys')['values']
   .apply(lambda x: x.cumsum().mod(max_sum).diff())
   .fillna(-1)
   .lt(0)
   .cumsum())                 

0     1
1     1
2     2
3     3
4     4
5     4
6     5
7     6
8     7
9     7
10    7
11    7
12    7
Name: values, dtype: int64

In a comment below, I wrote:

@Cleb Looks like my answer here is wrong. For 4, 4, 9, 2, the output should be 1, 1, 2, 3 but my code will assign 1, 1, 2, 2 because cumsum discounts the values.

So, here's my solution to address this corner case. Define a function that assigns groups:

grp = {'grp': 0}  # better than `global`, at least
def func(V):
    cumsum = 0
    grp['grp'] += 1
    grps = []
    for v in V.tolist():
        cumsum += v
        if cumsum > max_sum:
            cumsum = v
            grp['grp'] += 1
        grps.append(grp['grp'])

    return pd.Series(grps)

Now, call apply:

df.groupby('keys')['values'].apply(func).values
# array([1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7])
  • Thanks! I have to go through it to fully understand, so I upvote for now and then accept later on depending on the other answers. – Cleb Jun 3 at 21:47
  • 1
    I think we over kill the problem :-) haha factorize – WeNYoBen Jun 3 at 22:03
  • @Cleb Looks like my answer here is wrong. For 4, 4, 9, 2, the output should be 1, 1, 2, 3 but my code will assign 1, 1, 2, 2 because cumsum discounts the values. Take a look and let me know if that makes sense... – cs95 Jun 3 at 22:05
  • Ok, I check and unselect for now to not mislead others... ;) seems the one by @erfan actually works; it returns the desired 1, 1, 2, 3. Thanks a lot for noticing this. – Cleb Jun 3 at 22:06
  • 1
    @Cleb Have edited with a fix. – cs95 Jun 3 at 22:15
2

My logic , first get the cumsum within each group , then we need get the pervious group's max last group number cumsum assign to next group

s=(df.groupby('keys')['values'].cumsum()//10+1)
s+s.groupby(df['keys']).last().shift().fillna(0).cumsum().reindex(df['keys']).values

Out[24]: 
0     1.0
1     1.0
2     2.0
3     3.0
4     4.0
5     4.0
6     5.0
7     6.0
8     7.0
9     7.0
10    7.0
11    7.0
12    7.0
Name: values, dtype: float64

Another way

pd.factorize(list(zip(df['keys'],df.groupby('keys')['values'].cumsum()//10)))[0]+1
Out[51]: array([1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7], dtype=int64)

Method 3 Data From Pir

s=df.groupby('keys')['values'].rolling(2,min_periods=1).sum().gt(10)
s.loc[s.groupby(level=0).head(1).index[1:]]=True
s.cumsum()+1
Out[79]: 
keys    
a     0      1
      1      1
      2      2
      3      3
b     4      4
      5      4
      6      5
      7      6
c     8      7
      9      7
      10     7
      11     7
      12     7
d     13     8
      14     8
      15     9
      16    10
Name: values, dtype: int32
  • Works great, too, thanks! – Cleb Jun 3 at 21:54
  • great knowledge of the pandas methods! +1 – Erfan Jun 3 at 21:58
  • @Erfan adding another method :-) – WeNYoBen Jun 3 at 22:02
  • wow, the second one looks like cheating :) Thanks for adding this, too! – Cleb Jun 3 at 22:04
  • 1
    @Erfan wow thank you for let me know :-) – WeNYoBen Jun 3 at 22:07
2

This is not a vectorizable problem

At least not as far as I can tell

Setup

Consider the expanded example

df = pd.DataFrame({
    'keys': [*'aaaabbbbcccccdddddddd'],
    'values': [*map(int, '156824771111544922252')]
})

Using a generator

def gen_groups(tups, max_sum=10):
    label = 0
    sums = {}
    for key, val in tups:
        if key not in sums:
            label += 1
            sums[key] = 0
        sums[key] += val
        if sums[key] > max_sum:
            # This resets the summation
            # to the first thing that exceeded the max
            sums[key] = val
            label += 1
        yield label

df.assign(group=[*gen_groups(zip(df['keys'], df['values']))])

OUTPUT

   keys  values  group
0     a       1      1
1     a       5      1
2     a       6      2
3     a       8      3
4     b       2      4
5     b       4      4
6     b       7      5
7     b       7      6
8     c       1      7
9     c       1      7
10    c       1      7
11    c       1      7
12    c       5      7
13    d       4      8  # First group for `key == d` 
14    d       4      8  # Still same group because `4 + 4 <= 10`
15    d       9      9  # New group because `4 + 4 + 9 > 10`
16    d       2     10  # New group because `9 + 2 > 10`
17    d       2     10  # Same group because `2 + 2 < = 10`
18    d       2     10  # Same group because `2 + 2 + 2 <= 10`
19    d       5     11  # New Group because `2 + 2 + 2 + 5 > 10`
20    d       2     11  # Same Group because `5 + 2 <= 10`
  • Are you sure? Just checked with my method, gave correct result. – Erfan Jun 3 at 22:11
  • Will check it now – piRSquared Jun 3 at 22:11
  • 1
    @Cleb I'm fine with whatever you choose. Just remember: When life gives you dilemma's, make dilemmonaid. /mike_drop – piRSquared Jun 3 at 22:31
  • 3
    I probably go with @Erfan's answer as he answered the question based on the (apparently) poor example I chose. But interesting to see that you better understand want I want than I did :) Thanks once more! – Cleb Jun 3 at 22:33
  • 2
    No problem. Glad it worked out (-: – piRSquared Jun 3 at 22:34
0

I create groupID per cumsum and use it to group again together with keys to derive the ngroup per keys-cumsum

max_sum = 10
s = df.groupby('keys').values.cumsum().gt(max_sum ).cumsum()
df.groupby([df['keys'], s]).ngroup() + 1

Out[461]:
0     1
1     1
2     2
3     3
4     4
5     4
6     5
7     6
8     7
9     7
10    7
11    7
12    7
dtype: int64 

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