16

I recently read a book about system software. There is an example in it that I don't understand.

volatile T* pInst = 0;
T* GetInstance()
{
  if (pInst == NULL)
  {
   lock();
   if (pInst == NULL)
     pInst = new T;
   unlock();
  }
  return pInst;
}

Why does the author check (pInst == NULL) twice?

6
  • 17
  • @interjay wow it has a name... maybe I should change the title
    – BigDongle
    Jun 4, 2019 at 9:33
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    This code is UB. pInst is not atomic so there is a race condition here. This book must be very very old.
    – Oliv
    Jun 4, 2019 at 11:35
  • 2
    This is called "double-checked locking". Many newcomers to multi-threaded code reinvent it. It doesn't work. Jun 4, 2019 at 18:50
  • 1
    In Java this works, because volatile also means atomic. In C++ that's not the case. And, no, guessing about whether values get torn is not sufficient. One problem you can run into is that the value of the pointer may get stored and flushed, so that other threads see the updated value, but the actual data that it points to may not have been flushed, so other threads see garbage values. Don't mess with synchronization shortcuts. Your intuition (and mine) is almost certainly wrong. Jun 4, 2019 at 19:34

2 Answers 2

22

When two threads try call GetInstance() for the first time at the same time, both will see pInst == NULL at the first check. One thread will get the lock first, which allows it to modify pInst.

The second thread will wait for the lock to get available. When the first thread releases the lock, the second will get it, and now the value of pInst has already been modified by the first thread, so the second one doesn't need to create a new instance.

Only the second check between lock() and unlock() is safe. It would work without the first check, but it would be slower because every call to GetInstance() would call lock() and unlock(). The first check avoids unnecessary lock() calls.

volatile T* pInst = 0;
T* GetInstance()
{
  if (pInst == NULL) // unsafe check to avoid unnecessary and maybe slow lock()
  {
   lock(); // after this, only one thread can access pInst
   if (pInst == NULL) // check again because other thread may have modified it between first check and returning from lock()
     pInst = new T;
   unlock();
  }
  return pInst;
}

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-checked_locking (copied from interjay's comment).

Note: This implementation requires that both read and write accesses to volatile T* pInst are atomic. Otherwise the second thread may read a partially written value just being written by the first thread. For modern processors, accessing a pointer value (not the data being pointed to) is an atomic operation, although not guaranteed for all architectures.

If access to pInst was not atomic, the second thread may read a partially written non-NULL value when checking pInst before getting the lock and then may execute return pInst before the first thread has finished its operation, which would result in returning a wrong pointer value.

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  • 2
    The initial check introduces a data race, so the behavior is undefined. In practice, this means that the code will work just fine in house, but when you give a demo to your most valuable customer it will crash. Jun 4, 2019 at 19:08
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    Note that "probably slow lock()" is generally not the case. Locking lightly contested mutexes is generally pretty fast these days. Jun 4, 2019 at 19:08
  • @PeteBecker Only if by "pretty fast" you actually mean "still quite slow". At the very least, a lock will involve a memory barrier and an atomic operation, leading to suboptimal instruction scheduling, pipeline stalls, and scaling issues with many cores. If you have 100 threads each locking its own mutex, there's theoretically no contention at all, but all the inter-CPU synchronization will become a bottleneck anyway.
    – TooTea
    Jun 4, 2019 at 22:05
  • @PeteBecker what if you replaced volatile T* with std::atomic<T*> ?
    – hanshenrik
    Jun 4, 2019 at 22:18
  • @PeteBecker That book would be from before C++ had a memory model; in that paleoc++ic age, volatile ? was used in many dialects for atomic<?>, and the compilers complied with it. Jun 5, 2019 at 15:00
2

I assume lock() is costly operation. I also assume that read on T* pointers is done atomically on this platform, so you don't need to lock simple comparisons pInst == NULL, as the load operation of pInst value will be ex. a single assembly instruction on this platform.

Assuming that: If lock() is a costly operation, it's best not to execute it, if we don't have to. So first we check if pInst == NULL. This will be a single assembly instruction, so we don't need to lock() it. If pInst == NULL, we need to modify it's value, allocate new pInst = new ....

But - imagine a situation, where 2 (or more) threads are right in the point between first pInst == NULL and right before lock(). Both threads will to pInst = new. They already checked the first pInst == NULL and for both of them it was true.

The first (any) thread starts it's execution and does lock(); pInst = new T; unlock(). Then the second thread waiting on lock() starts it's execution. When it starts, pInst != NULL, because another thread allocated that. So we need to check it pInst == NULL inside lock() again, so that memory is not leaked and pInst overwritten..

3
  • I also assume that read and write on T* pointers are done atomically Atomicity is not necessary, assuming the lock() is implemented using pthread_mutex_lock() or similar, as pthread_mutex_lock() and other POSIX synchronization functions are all full memory barriers. The same for Windows synchronization functions. Jun 4, 2019 at 10:20
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    @AndrewHenle I’m not sure on the details of atomicity and memory barries. But wouldn’t, if the load wasn’t atomic, the following be possible (T1, T2 are threads): T1 calls GetInstance(), acquires lock, initialises pInst. T2 calls GetInstance(), sees a partially written pInst (e.g. lower half is set). The NULL check fails, thus no lock()/unlock() in the code path, thus no barrier(?). The (partial) pInst value can be cached in a register and is returned instead of re-read from the global memory location. Jun 4, 2019 at 18:31
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    The minimum number of modifications required to make this code work is an acquire operation on the read, a release operation on the write, and atomic access. You need atomic access because otherwise, a thread that did not take the lock might observe a torn write to pInst. You need a release operation to prevent the thread that creates the object from setting pInst while the object is only half instantiated. You need an acquire operation to ensure that when a thread observes pInst != NULL, it can also observe the rest of the writes made by the thread that created the object.
    – Stefan
    Jun 4, 2019 at 20:40

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