1

I am developing an application library using GTK and the functions for threads in GLib. I have a thread (from now on will be called thread A) that is created when I hit an "ok" button in a certain graphical window. Thread A starts doing some heavy tasks. Another button named "cancel" is available to stop and finish thread A at any moment.

My aim is to code a function for the thread created when I hit the "cancel" button (thread B) that has the ability to end the thread A.

I create thread A with the function g_thread_create. However I cannot find any function similar to g_thread_cancel to stop thread A using thread B. Is this possible or cannot be done?

Thank you so much for any kind of information provided.

  • 1
    cancelling thread is IMHO a bad practice, especially because cancellations points are usually badly known and limited. This created situation where the code seems to work but mainly hopefully works. If you want to stop a thread, you should be able to ask it to gently stop what it should be able to to. – OznOg Jun 4 at 19:19
3

You might want to consider using GTask to run your task in a thread, rather than using a manually-created thread. If you use g_task_run_in_thread(), the operation will run in a separate thread automatically.

GTask is integrated with GCancellable, so to cancel the operation you would call g_cancellable_cancel() in the callback from your ‘Cancel’ button.

As OznOg says, you should treat the GCancellable as a way of gently (and thread-safely) telling your task that it should cancel. Depending on how your long-running task is written, you could either check g_cancellable_is_cancelled() once per loop iteration, or you could add the GSource from g_cancellable_source_new() to a poll loop in your task.

The advice about using threads with GLib is probably also relevant here.

1

I have developed a code that is able to cancel a thread from another, both of them created from a main one. The code works correctly according to my tests:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

    /* these variables are references to the first and second threads */
    pthread_t inc_x_thread, inc_y_thread;

/* this function is run by the first thread */
void *inc_x(void *x_void_ptr)
{

    pthread_setcancelstate(PTHREAD_CANCEL_ENABLE, NULL);

    /* increment x to 100 */
    int *x_ptr = (int *)x_void_ptr;



    while(++(*x_ptr) < 100000000);


    printf("x increment finished\n");

    /* the function must return something - NULL will do */
    return NULL;
}

/* this function is run by the second thread */
void *inc_y(void *x_void_ptr)
{

    pthread_setcancelstate(PTHREAD_CANCEL_ENABLE, NULL);

    /* increment y to 100 */
    int *x_ptr = (int *)x_void_ptr;

    pthread_cancel(inc_x_thread);

    while(++(*x_ptr) < 100);

    printf("y increment finished\n");

    return NULL;
}

/* this is the main thread */
int main()
{

    int x = 0, y = 0;
    void *res;

    /* show the initial values of x and y */
    printf("x: %d, y: %d\n", x, y);

    /* create a first thread */
    if(pthread_create(&inc_x_thread, NULL, inc_x, &x)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error creating thread\n");
        return 1;
    }

    /* create a second thread */
    if(pthread_create(&inc_y_thread, NULL, inc_y, &y)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error creating thread\n");
        return 1;
    }

    /* wait for the first thread to finish */
    if(pthread_join(inc_x_thread, &res)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error joining thread\n");
        return 2;
    }

           if (res == PTHREAD_CANCELED)
               printf(" thread was canceled\n");
           else
               printf(" thread wasn't canceled\n");

    /* wait for the second thread to finish */
    if(pthread_join(inc_y_thread, &res)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error joining thread\n");
        return 2;
    }

           if (res == PTHREAD_CANCELED)
               printf(" thread was canceled\n");
           else
               printf(" thread wasn't canceled\n");

    /* show the results*/
    printf("x: %d, y: %d\n", x, y);

    return 0;
}

You can compile the code by using: gcc example.c -lpthread

However, as OznOg and Philip Withnall have said, this is not the correct way of cancelling a thread. It is only a quick way of doing it that might not work in some specific situations. A better and safer way is to gently ask the thread to stop itself.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.