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Why is an instance needed for field whyIsAnInstanceRequired and won't work as in field errWhyIsAnInstanceRequired?

The compile error is:

Error: java: incompatible types: invalid method reference
            unexpected instance method function(programming.java.FunctionalQuestion.Helper,programming.java.FunctionalQuestion) found in unbound lookup

See code:

public class FunctionalQuestion {

    class Helper { }

    public void setValue (long value) { }

    ObjLongConsumer<FunctionalQuestion> whyIsAnInstanceNotRequired =
        FunctionalQuestion::setValue;

    public void function(Helper helper, FunctionalQuestion functionalQuestion) { }

    BiConsumer<Helper, FunctionalQuestion> whyIsAnInstanceRequired =
        new FunctionalQuestion()::function;

    /*
    * Error: java: incompatible types: invalid method reference
        unexpected instance method function(programming.java.FunctionalQuestion.Helper,programming.java.FunctionalQuestion) found in unbound lookup
    * */
    BiConsumer<Helper, FunctionalQuestion> errWhyIsAnInstanceRequired =
        FunctionalQuestion::function;

}
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    Well, function(…) is not static, hence requires an instance for an invocation, whether you invoke it directly like someInstance.function(…) or from a method reference. – Holger Jun 6 '19 at 15:28
  • But on field whyIsAnInstanceNotRequired, it’s not in a static context and yet it seems to reference statically(without an instance) FunctionalQuestion::setValue, member function. – Rodrigo Gomez Jun 6 '19 at 16:22
  • 1
    If you want to bind the non-static context, i.e. this, just use this::function. Compare with ordinary method invocations; you can’t use FunctionalQuestion.function(…) regardless of the context. But you can use this.function(…) in a non-static context. Or otherObject.function(…) in any context. Omitting the context, like with function(…), is not supported for method references. If you want to have that, you’d need a lambda expression, (h,q) -> function(h,q). – Holger Jun 6 '19 at 16:30
  • I think I understand the constraints about the static context. But how does it explain, why this works?: java.util.function.ObjLongConsumer<FunctionalQuestion> whyIsAnInstanceNotRequired = FunctionalQuestion::setValue; public void function(Helper helper, FunctionalQuestion functionalQuestion) {} vs java.util.function.ObjLongConsumer<FunctionalQuestion> whyIsAnInstanceNotRequired = this::setValue; private void setValue(FunctionalQuestion functionalQuestion, long l) { } – Rodrigo Gomez Jun 6 '19 at 22:41
  • I'm starting to realize it comes down to method signatures. Somehow this may imply the first argument, where static doesn't affect the method signature. – Rodrigo Gomez Jun 6 '19 at 22:45
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I believe this explains why I was surprised by the original code.

This concept is called:

Reference to an instance method of an arbitrary object of a particular type.

Example: ContainingType::methodName as explained in: methodreferences.html

From that document:

The following is an example of a reference to an instance method of an arbitrary object of a particular type:

String[] stringArray 
       = { "Barbara", "James", "Mary", "John","Patricia", "Robert", "Michael", "Linda" };
Arrays.sort(stringArray, String::compareToIgnoreCase);

The equivalent lambda expression for the method reference String::compareToIgnoreCase would have the formal parameter list (String a, String b), where a and b are arbitrary names used to better describe this example. The method reference would invoke the method a.compareToIgnoreCase(b).

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