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How can I filter elements of the list based on their index(position) using stream() in Java? I want to filter every third element (i.e. indices 0, 3, 6, 9,... of a List<String>).

  • 2
    Have you tried anything? – barbsan Jun 5 at 8:05
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    What have you tried so far? – Ravindra Ranwala Jun 5 at 8:05
2

You'll have to use an IntStream.

For example, the following will create a Stream containing all the List elements whose indices are divisible by 3:

List<String> yourList = ...
IntStream.range(0,yourList.size()) // IntStream of 0,1,2,3,...
         .filter(i -> i % 3 == 0) // IntStream of 0,3,6,...
         .mapToObj(yourList::get) // Stream<String> of yourList.get(0),yourList.get(3),...
         ...
  • 3
    Of course, with any list where get isn't direct access (like a LinkedList), this is dramatically less efficient than just looping through the list using its iterator in the boring old-fashioned way. But the question did specify stream... (With direct access lists like ArrayList, it's only less efficient, not dramatically less efficient.) – T.J. Crowder Jun 5 at 8:09
  • @T.J.Crowder but no sane programmer would use LinkedList anyway. But using IntStream.range(0, list.size()/3).mapToObj(i -> list.get(i*3)) … would be even more efficient, as it avoids performing list.size() conditionals involving a modulo operation and enables the stream to utilize the known size, e.g. for the terminal operations toArray, count or for parallel streams. That’s already more efficient than an Iterator based loop and can be optimized to the same performance than a counting loop, after inlining. – Holger Jun 5 at 10:34
  • @Holger - LinkedList has uses. Just not when you want O(1) access time. – T.J. Crowder Jun 5 at 11:40
  • @T.J.Crowder and generally not for any algorithm based on the List interface (other than acquiring a ListIterator). You will rarely find a use case for LinkedList without a better alternative. That’s not about the concept of linked lists, but rather this particular implementation class as a member of Java’s Collection framework. – Holger Jun 5 at 11:49
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Since Java 9 you can use IntStream.iterate() to achieve that:

IntStream.iterate(0, i -> i < list.size(), i -> i + 3)
        .mapToObj(list::get)
        .forEach(System.out::println);

If you are using Java 8 you can use this:

IntStream.iterate(0, i -> i + 3)
        .limit(list.size() / 3)
        .mapToObj(list::get)
        .forEach(System.out::println);

Edit: As Holger pointed out in the comments a more efficient solution would be this:

IntStream.range(0, list.size() / 3)
        .mapToObj(i -> list.get(i * 3))
        .forEach(System.out::println);
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    More efficient: IntStream.range(0, list.size()/3).mapToObj(i -> list.get(i*3)) … – Holger Jun 5 at 10:27
  • @Holger Why is this more efficient? – Samuel Philipp Jun 5 at 10:35
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    It boils down to an internal counting loop rather than a loop evaluating two opaque functions. These could get optimized to the same loop logic if the JVM manages to inline them, but still, the Stream implementation behaves differently for some operations when the size is predictable (see also here). – Holger Jun 5 at 10:38

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