3

Above VS 2015, with /Zc:threadSafeInit, the initialization of static local variables is thread-safe, but MSDN said

Thread-safe static local variables use thread-local storage (TLS) internally to provide efficient execution when the static has already been initialized.

Windows XP ignores the .tls segment if dynamically loading a Dll with LoadLibrary, so

  1. Why use TLS and how does it work efficient ?
  2. Does std::call_once use TLS ?
  3. How to implement thread-safe-init without TLS?

The link of the citation is here Thread-safe Local Static Initialization

The implementation of this feature relies on Windows operating system support functions in Windows Vista and later operating systems. Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and older operating systems do not have this support, so they do not get the efficiency advantage.

My test code:

class AA
{
public:
    int m_a = 1;
};

AA* getAA()
{
    static AA a;
    return &a;
}

int main()
{
    AA* pa = getAA();
    return 0;
}

With /Zc:threadSafeInit, function getAA in windbg disassembles to:

008c1000 55              push    ebp
008c1001 8bec            mov     ebp,esp
008c1003 64a12c000000    mov     eax,dword ptr fs:[0000002Ch]
008c1009 8b08            mov     ecx,dword ptr [eax]
008c100b 8b15b8338c00    mov     edx,dword ptr [testStatic!__favor+0x4 (008c33b8)]
008c1011 3b9104000000    cmp     edx,dword ptr [ecx+4]
008c1017 7e2d            jle     testStatic!getAA+0x46 (008c1046)
008c1019 68b8338c00      push    offset testStatic!__favor+0x4 (008c33b8)
008c101e e809020000      call    testStatic!_Init_thread_header (008c122c)
008c1023 83c404          add     esp,4
008c1026 833db8338c00ff  cmp     dword ptr [testStatic!__favor+0x4 (008c33b8)],0FFFFFFFFh
008c102d 7517            jne     testStatic!getAA+0x46 (008c1046)
008c102f b9bc338c00      mov     ecx,offset testStatic!a (008c33bc)
008c1034 e817000000      call    testStatic!AA::AA (008c1050)
008c1039 68b8338c00      push    offset testStatic!__favor+0x4 (008c33b8)
008c103e e89f010000      call    testStatic!_Init_thread_footer (008c11e2)
008c1043 83c404          add     esp,4
008c1046 b8bc338c00      mov     eax,offset testStatic!a (008c33bc)
008c104b 5d              pop     ebp
008c104c c3              ret

and with /Zc:threadSafeInit-(close the feature), function getAA disassembles to:

010e1000 55              push    ebp
010e1001 8bec            mov     ebp,esp
010e1003 a180330e01      mov     eax,dword ptr [testStatic!a+0x4 (010e3380)]
010e1008 83e001          and     eax,1
010e100b 7519            jne     testStatic!getAA+0x26 (010e1026)
010e100d 8b0d80330e01    mov     ecx,dword ptr [testStatic!a+0x4 (010e3380)]
010e1013 83c901          or      ecx,1
010e1016 890d80330e01    mov     dword ptr [testStatic!a+0x4 (010e3380)],ecx
010e101c b97c330e01      mov     ecx,offset testStatic!a (010e337c)
010e1021 e80a000000      call    testStatic!AA::AA (010e1030)
010e1026 b87c330e01      mov     eax,offset testStatic!a (010e337c)
010e102b 5d              pop     ebp
010e102c c3              ret
5
  • Microsoft source codes are not public, so it is impossible to say what reasons stay behind specific technical solutions; so, why use TLS is more question to Microsoft support than to public. The same is about std::call_once implementation by Microsoft. However, you should have no issues about that. I created a lot of software with Visual C++ and I never had any observable performance issues due to static initialization or call_once. If you need something very specific, you can use low level OS API to implement your static initialization yourself, but I am sure you don't really need it.
    – Vitalii
    Jun 5, 2019 at 11:31
  • Have you tried is on XP and check it doesn't work? A quick step through the dissassembly should show you whether it uses a non tls path on XP.
    – Mike Vine
    Jun 5, 2019 at 12:12
  • 1
    But anyway, if you look at appendix A of this paper it uses thread local storage to very cleverly avoid having a memory barrier in the fast (i.e. already initialised) case. I'd assume MSVC uses this or a similar algorithm to achieve the same thing. Shouldn't be too hard to check the output asm.
    – Mike Vine
    Jun 5, 2019 at 12:13
  • @Vitaliy Thanks for your answer. The specific compiler implement the C++11 feature, and I just want to ascertain the implementation mechanism. ex. to support xp, maybe /Zc:threadSafeInit- is useful, but static local variable is not threadsafe with this compiler option.
    – jaybird
    Jun 6, 2019 at 2:37
  • @MikeVine Thanks for your answer. I append the msdn link about thread-safe in xp and some test code. my asm ability is poor, but i'll learn your link seriously,thanks for your help.
    – jaybird
    Jun 6, 2019 at 2:50

1 Answer 1

2

Why MSVC thread-safe initialization of static local variables use TLS

TLS is only used as an optimization. For static initialization it uses a single global critical section or, when available, an SRW Lock.

You can see it in VC++ CRT source crt/src/vcruntime/thread_safe_statics.cpp.

It's open source and available as part of MSVC installation. I'm including the relevant fragment here for reference:

//
// thread_safe_statics.cpp
//
//      Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
//
// Helper functions used by thread-safe static initialization.
//
#ifdef _M_CEE
    #error This file cannot be built as managed
#endif

#include <vcstartup_internal.h>
#include <vcruntime_internal.h>
#include <limits.h>

static DWORD const xp_timeout = 100; // ms
static int const uninitialized = 0;
static int const being_initialized = -1;
static int const epoch_start = INT_MIN;

// Access to these variables is guarded in the below functions.  They may only
// be modified while the lock is held.  _Tss_epoch is readable from user
// code and is read without taking the lock.
extern "C"
{
    int _Init_global_epoch = epoch_start;
    __declspec(thread) int _Init_thread_epoch = epoch_start;
}

// On Vista or newer, the native CONDITION_VARIABLE type is used.  On XP, we use a simple
// Windows event.  This is not safe to use as a complete condition variable, but for the purposes
// of this feature the event is sufficient but not optimal.  See the code in _Tss_wait
// below.
//
// For Windows OS components:  The OS supports APISets downlevel to Windows 7,
// and OS components that run downlevel to Windows 7 may build against APISets.
// However, these components cannot use CONDITION_VARIABLE directly because it
// is not available via APISets until Windows 8.  Thus, for Windows OS components,
// we use the "ancient" code path and first try the APISet and then fall back to
// kernel32.dll.
#if defined _SCRT_ENCLAVE_BUILD || defined _CRT_APP || defined _CRT_WINDOWS_USE_VISTA_TSS \
    || (!defined _CRT_WINDOWS && (defined _ONECORE || defined _M_ARM || defined _M_ARM64))
#define _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS 1
#else
#define _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS 0
#endif

static CONDITION_VARIABLE g_tss_cv;

#if _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
static SRWLOCK g_tss_srw;
#else // ^^^ _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS ^^^ // vvv !_USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS vvv //
static HANDLE             g_tss_event;
static CRITICAL_SECTION   g_tss_mutex;
static decltype(SleepConditionVariableCS)* g_sleep_condition_variable_cs;
static decltype(WakeAllConditionVariable)* g_wake_all_condition_variable;

static void __cdecl __scrt_initialize_thread_safe_statics_platform_specific() noexcept
{
    // This can fail pre-Vista and that is ignored.
    InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount(&g_tss_mutex, 4000);

    // CONDITION_VARIABLE is available via this APISet starting on Windows 8.
    HMODULE kernel_dll = GetModuleHandleW(L"api-ms-win-core-synch-l1-2-0.dll");
    if (kernel_dll == nullptr)
    {
        kernel_dll = GetModuleHandleW(L"kernel32.dll");
    }

    if (kernel_dll == nullptr)
    {
        __scrt_fastfail(FAST_FAIL_FATAL_APP_EXIT);
    }

    #define GET_PROC_ADDRESS(m, f) reinterpret_cast<decltype(f)*>(GetProcAddress(m, _CRT_STRINGIZE(f)))

    auto const sleep_condition_variable_cs = GET_PROC_ADDRESS(kernel_dll, SleepConditionVariableCS);
    auto const wake_all_condition_variable = GET_PROC_ADDRESS(kernel_dll, WakeAllConditionVariable);

    #undef GET_PROC_ADDRESS

    if (sleep_condition_variable_cs && wake_all_condition_variable)
    {
        g_sleep_condition_variable_cs = sleep_condition_variable_cs;
        g_wake_all_condition_variable = wake_all_condition_variable;
    }
    else
    {
        g_tss_event = CreateEventW(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);
        if (g_tss_event == nullptr)
        {
            __scrt_fastfail(FAST_FAIL_FATAL_APP_EXIT);
        }
    }
}

// Terminator for synchronization data structures.
static void __cdecl __scrt_uninitialize_thread_safe_statics() noexcept
{
    DeleteCriticalSection(&g_tss_mutex);
    if (g_tss_event != nullptr)
    {
        CloseHandle(g_tss_event);
    }
}

// Initializer for synchronization data structures.
static int __cdecl __scrt_initialize_thread_safe_statics() noexcept
{
    __scrt_initialize_thread_safe_statics_platform_specific();

    // If CRT initialization was skipped then we should initialize the atexit tables.
    // This will only be needed when using a managed DLL with /NOENTRY specified.
    if (!__scrt_initialize_onexit_tables(__scrt_module_type::dll))
    {
        __scrt_fastfail(FAST_FAIL_FATAL_APP_EXIT);
    }
    atexit(__scrt_uninitialize_thread_safe_statics);
    return 0;
}

_CRTALLOC(".CRT$XIC") static _PIFV __scrt_initialize_tss_var = __scrt_initialize_thread_safe_statics;
#endif // _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS

// Helper functions for accessing the mutex and condition variable.  Can be replaced with
// more suitable data structures provided by the CRT, preferably ones that use the most
// efficient synchronization primitives available on the platform.
// This is not intended to be a recursive lock.
extern "C" void __cdecl _Init_thread_lock()
{
#if _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
    AcquireSRWLockExclusive(&g_tss_srw);
#else // ^^^ _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS ^^^ // vvv !_USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS vvv
    EnterCriticalSection(&g_tss_mutex);
#endif // _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
}

extern "C" void __cdecl _Init_thread_unlock()
{
#if _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
    ReleaseSRWLockExclusive(&g_tss_srw);
#else // ^^^ _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS ^^^ // vvv !_USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS vvv
    LeaveCriticalSection(&g_tss_mutex);
#endif // _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
}

// Wait on the condition variable.  In the XP implementation using only a Windows event
// we can't guarantee that we'll ever actually receive the notification signal, so we
// must use a non-infinite timeout.  This is not optimal: we may wake up early if the
// initializer is long-running, or we may miss the signal and not wake up until the
// timeout expires.  The signal may be missed because the sleeping threads may be
// stolen by the kernel to service an APC, or due to the race condition between the
// unlock call and the WaitForSingleObject call.
extern "C" void __cdecl _Init_thread_wait(DWORD const timeout)
{
#if _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
    SleepConditionVariableSRW(&g_tss_cv, &g_tss_srw, timeout, 0);
#else // ^^^ _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS ^^^ // vvv !_USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS vvv //
    if (g_sleep_condition_variable_cs)
    {
        // Vista+ code is first because it's most likely
        g_sleep_condition_variable_cs(&g_tss_cv, &g_tss_mutex, timeout);
        return;
    }

    _ASSERT(timeout != INFINITE);
    _Init_thread_unlock();
    WaitForSingleObjectEx(g_tss_event, timeout, FALSE);
    _Init_thread_lock();
#endif // _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
}

extern "C" void __cdecl _Init_thread_notify()
{
#if _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
    WakeAllConditionVariable(&g_tss_cv);
#else // ^^^ _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS ^^^ // vvv !_USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS vvv
    if (g_wake_all_condition_variable)
    {
        // Vista+ code is first because it's most likely
        g_wake_all_condition_variable(&g_tss_cv);
        return;
    }

    SetEvent(g_tss_event);
    ResetEvent(g_tss_event);
#endif // _USE_VISTA_THREAD_SAFE_STATICS
}

// Control access to the initialization expression.  Only one thread may leave
// this function before the variable has completed initialization, this thread
// will perform initialization.  All other threads are blocked until the
// initialization completes or fails due to an exception.
extern "C" void __cdecl _Init_thread_header(int* const pOnce) noexcept
{
    _Init_thread_lock();

    if (*pOnce == uninitialized)
    {
        *pOnce = being_initialized;
    }
    else
    {
        while (*pOnce == being_initialized)
        {
            // Timeout can be replaced with an infinite wait when XP support is
            // removed or the XP-based condition variable is sophisticated enough
            // to guarantee all waiting threads will be woken when the variable is
            // signalled.
            _Init_thread_wait(xp_timeout);

            if (*pOnce == uninitialized)
            {
                *pOnce = being_initialized;
                _Init_thread_unlock();
                return;
            }
        }
        _Init_thread_epoch = _Init_global_epoch;
    }

    _Init_thread_unlock();
}

// Abort processing of the initializer due to an exception.  Reset the state
// to uninitialized and release waiting threads (one of which will take over
// initialization, any remaining will again sleep).
extern "C" void __cdecl _Init_thread_abort(int* const pOnce) noexcept
{
    _Init_thread_lock();
    *pOnce = uninitialized;
    _Init_thread_unlock();
    _Init_thread_notify();
}

// Called by the thread that completes initialization of a variable.
// Increment the global and per thread counters, mark the variable as
// initialized, and release waiting threads.
extern "C" void __cdecl _Init_thread_footer(int* const pOnce) noexcept
{
    _Init_thread_lock();
    ++_Init_global_epoch;
    *pOnce = _Init_global_epoch;
    _Init_thread_epoch = _Init_global_epoch;
    _Init_thread_unlock();
    _Init_thread_notify();
}

The reason why a lock is required stems from the ISO C++ standard ([stmt.dcl]/4), which requires block-scoped static locals to be initialized exactly once and in a thread-safe manner (this part is also explained in the MSDN article about /Zc:threadSafeInit, which can be used to relax this requirement as a compiler extension).

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.