28

I am from Python background and recently learning C++. I was learning a C/C++ function called memset and following the online example from website https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/memset-in-cpp/ where I got some compilation errors:

/**
 * @author      : Bhishan Poudel
 * @file        : a02_memset_geeks.cpp
 * @created     : Wednesday Jun 05, 2019 11:07:03 EDT
 * 
 * Ref: 
 */

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    char str[] = "geeksforgeeks";

    //memset(str, "t", sizeof(str));
    memset(str, 't', sizeof(str));

    cout << str << endl;

    return 0;
}

Error when using single quotes 't'
This prints extra characters.

tttttttttttttt!R@`

Error when using "t" with double quotes

$ g++ -std=c++11 a02_memset_geeks.cpp 
a02_memset_geeks.cpp:17:5: error: no matching function for call to 'memset'
    memset(str, "t", sizeof(str));
    ^~~~~~
/usr/include/string.h:74:7: note: candidate function not viable: no known
      conversion from 'const char [2]' to 'int' for 2nd argument
void    *memset(void *, int, size_t);
         ^
1 error generated.

How to use the memset in C++ ?

Further Study
Excellent tutorial with shortcomings of memset is given here: https://web.archive.org/web/20170702122030/https:/augias.org/paercebal/tech_doc/doc.en/cp.memset_is_evil.html

closed as off-topic by SergeyA, Hans Passant, L. F., ivan_pozdeev, phuclv Jun 7 at 1:37

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – SergeyA, Hans Passant, L. F., ivan_pozdeev, phuclv
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 16
    "t" and 't' are not the same. – SergeyA Jun 5 at 15:14
  • 16
    most online learning resources for c++ are crap and afaik that site is no exception, give this a try instead: stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/… – formerlyknownas_463035818 Jun 5 at 15:17
  • 8
    Why even use memset in C++? The reason old C functions exists is for backwards compability. – klutt Jun 5 at 15:23
  • 12
    It is a loaded gun, you aimed it at your left foot and pulled the trigger. You have to aim right. – Hans Passant Jun 5 at 15:23
  • 8
    You should not change question underneath people who are answering it. If you take a comment or answer in and it is still not working, you can ask another question, but this sort of editing, which replaces once question with another, is destructive – SergeyA Jun 5 at 15:31
64

This declaration

char str[] = "geeksforgeeks";

declares a character array that contains a string that is a sequence of characters including the terminating zero symbol '\0'.

You can imagine the declaration the following equivalent way

char str[] = 
{ 
    'g', 'e', 'e', 'k', 's', 'f', 'o', 'r', 'g', 'e', 'e', 'k', 's', '\0'
};

This call of the function memset

memset(str, 't', sizeof(str));

overrides all characters of the array including the terminating zero.

So the next statement

cout << str << endl;

results in undefined behaviour because it outpuuts characters until the terminating zero is encountered.

You could write instead

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

int main()
{
    char str[] = "geeksforgeeks";

    std::memset( str, 't', sizeof( str ) - 1 );

    std::cout << str << '\n';
}

Or the following way

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

int main()
{
    char str[] = "geeksforgeeks";

    std::memset( str, 't', std::strlen( str ) );

    std::cout << str << '\n';
}

That is keeping the terminating zero unchanged in the array.

If you want to override all characters of the array including the terminating zero, then you should substitute this statement

std::cout << str << '\n';

for this statement

std::cout.write( str, sizeof( str ) ) << '\n';

as it is shown in the program below because the array now does not contain a string.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

int main()
{
    char str[] = "geeksforgeeks";

    std::memset( str, 't', sizeof( str ) );

    std::cout.write( str, sizeof( str ) ) << '\n';
}

As for this call

memset(str, "t", sizeof(str));

then the type of the second argument (that is the type const char *) does not correspond to the type of the second function parameter that has the type int. See the declaration of the function

void * memset ( void * ptr, int value, size_t num );

Thus the compiler issues an error message.

Apart from character arrays (that are used very often even in C++) you can use also the standard class std::string (or std::basic_string) that simulates strings.

In this case there is no need to use the standard C function memset to fill a string with a single character. The simplest way to do this is the following

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s( "geeksforgeeks" );

    s.assign( s.length(), 't' );

    std::cout << s << '\n';
}

Another way is to use the standard algorithm std::fill or std::fill_n declared in the header <algorithm>. For example

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::string s( "geeksforgeeks" );

    std::fill( std::begin( s ), std::end( s ), 't' );

    std::cout << s << '\n';
}

or

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::string s( "geeksforgeeks" );

    std::fill_n( std::begin( s ), s.length(), 't' );

    std::cout << s << '\n';
}

You even can use the method replace of the class std::string one of the following ways

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s( "geeksforgeeks" );

    s.replace( 0, s.length(), s.length(), 't' );

    std::cout << s << '\n';
}

Or

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s( "geeksforgeeks" );

    s.replace( std::begin( s ), std::end( s ), s.length(), 't' );

    std::cout << s << '\n';
}
  • 19
    The original post clearly indicates that the user is trying to learn C++. Please mention at least that none of this is relevant if you use std::string, which should be used here instead instead of using this complicated C stuff. (It might be relevant to know, though not at the beginning of a course) – JVApen Jun 5 at 17:52
  • 6
    @JVApen The original post clearly indicates that the user is trying to know how to use memset with character arrays.:) – Vlad from Moscow Jun 6 at 12:13
  • 1
    Good answer. If you want it to be better for the OP: note the difference in the type system. C++ has a static type system, where variables have a fixed static type. Python has a fully dynamic type system, where values have a type and variables do not. This is probably the source of his confusion involving 't' and "t". – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jun 6 at 15:45
  • What do you mean by "simulates strings"? – Ruslan Jun 6 at 21:30
  • @Ray You are mistaken. For starters a correct declaration will look like const char *str = "geeksforgeeks"; And in any case string literals in C and C++ are immutable. Any attempt to change a string literal results in undefined behaviour. – Vlad from Moscow Jun 7 at 13:35
32

Error when using single quotes 't' This prints extra characters.

That's because you overwrote the null terminator.

The terminator is part of the array's size (an array is not magic), though it's not part of the logical string size.

So, I think you meant:

memset(str, 't', strlen(str));
//               ^^^^^^

Error when using "t" with double quotes

Completely different thing. You told the computer to set every character in the string, to a string. Doesn't make sense; won't compile.


How to use memset in C++?

Don't.

Either use the type-safe std::fill, in combination with std::begin and std::end:

std::fill(std::begin(str), std::end(str)-1, 't');

(If you're worried about performance, don't be: this will just delegate to memset where possible via template specialisation, optimisation not required, without sacrificing type-safety; example here in libstdc++.)

Or just a std::string to begin with. 😊


I was learning the fuction memset in C++ from https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/memset-in-cpp/ where the example is given as below

Don't attempt to learn C++ from random websites. Get yourself a good book instead.

  • 4
    unfortunately it really is sizeof in the orginial example. A pity that such code is used to "teach" c++ :( – formerlyknownas_463035818 Jun 5 at 15:25
  • I am learning C++, and learning online from geeksforgeeks.org/memset-in-cpp, The example is taken from there, nothing warnings were given there. Thanks for the usage info. – astro123 Jun 5 at 15:25
  • 3
    @astro123 Another reason to work from a good book instead. There are different kinds of literals in C++, which is completely different from Python. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 5 at 15:28
  • 6
    This site (geeksforgeeks) should be forever banned. – SergeyA Jun 5 at 15:32
  • 6
    @astro123: learning online from geeksforgeeks.org/memset-in-cpp There's your first problem. That tutorial has a serious bug in its tiny example. This is not rare on geeksforgeeks.org. There is some good stuff, but it's often mixed in with bad stuff, and until you're already an expert you won't know how to tell the difference. Unlike Stack Overflow, geeksforgeeks doesn't have a voting mechanism for people to review posts and indicate their quality, so you have no way of knowing which ones to trust. – Peter Cordes Jun 6 at 0:23
5

Vlad has helpfully answered the first part of your question, but I feel like the second part could be explained a little more intuitively:

As others have mentioned, 't' is a character whereas "t" is a string, and strings have a null terminator at the end. This makes "t" an array of not one but two characters - ['t', '\0']! This makes memset's error more intuitive - it can coerce a single char to an int easily enough, but it chokes when it's given an array of chars. Just like in Python, int(['t', '\0']) (or ord(['t', '\0'])) doesn't compute.

  • 2
    And to be even more precise, when passing "t", one passes the address of 't' in "t". So if it were converted to the int parameter in memset, it would be the pointer to 't' getting converted to int, rather than the value of the string getting converted to int. – grovkin Jun 6 at 19:58
5

This is the correct syntax for memset...

void* memset( void* dest, int ch, std::size_t count );

Converts the value ch to unsigned char and copies it into each of the first count characters of the object pointed to by dest. If the object is a potentially-overlapping subobject or is not TriviallyCopyable (e.g., scalar, C-compatible struct, or an array of trivially copyable type), the behaviour is undefined. If count is greater than the size of the object pointed to by dest, the behaviour is undefined.

(source)

For the first syntax memset(str, 't', sizeof(str));. The compiler complained because of extra size. It prints 18 times tttttttttttttt!R@. I suggest try with sizeof(str) -1 for char array.

For Second syntax memset(str, "t", sizeof(str)); you are providing the second parameter is a string. This is the reason compiler complains error: invalid conversion from ‘const char*’ to ‘int’

  • potentially-overlapping subobject of what? It's not automatically UB to modify the object-representation of other objects in C++. For example, uint32_t has a fully defined object representation (except for the endian byte-order). So it's not clear what kind of overlap you're talking about, because memset only takes one pointer arg; the other args are by value. That phrasing makes sense for memcpy which forbids overlap, unlike memmove. – Peter Cordes Jun 6 at 0:26
  • @PeterCordes To be fair, that phrase was plagiarised from cppreference.com. So if it's wrong, cppreference.com needs to be corrected. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 6 at 9:48
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: on cppref, that phrase is a hyperlink to a definition that makes sense. It's somewhat plausible for it to be UB if a memset might be modifying the bytes of another object as well (because the pointer is to a subojected of a struct that's declared with [[no_unique_address]] allowing a compiler to do whatever it wants, including create bitfields for narrow or bool types I guess). I'm less clear on the "base class subobject" part; possibly that's UB because it could overwrite a vtable pointer? – Peter Cordes Jun 6 at 9:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.