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I want to create a type that returns the functions of its generic type argument. It should behave like keyof but return only the keys that are used to call functions

I am using typescript 3.4.5.

Use Case:

type FunctionOf<T> = ... // <-- what I want

function testFunction<T, U extends FunctionOf<T>>(obj: T, functionName: U): T[U] { 
  return obj[functionName]();
}

My specific case:

export type Mapper<T, U> = (value: T, index?: number, array?: T[]) => U;

type IsFunction<T> = T extends Function ? T & Function : never;

export function toField<T, U extends keyof T, V extends IsFunction<T[U]>>(key: U): Mapper<T, V extends () => infer R ? R : never> {
    return (value: T) => (value[key] as V)();
}

class Test {
    x: string;
    constructor(x: string) {
        this.x = x;
    }

    getX(): string { return this.x; }
}

const y: Test[] = [new Test('hello')];

y.map(toField('getX')); // putting in 'x' will not cause the entire return to be never which is what I want.

I expect the above to restrict the accepted arguments to just the functions of Test but it doesn't

EDIT: I may have found a solution, but only when I use 'any' (I have no-unsafe-any as a rule). This correctly infers that the return type should be never when the field provided is not a function, but doesn't cause any compile errors. While this fixes my specific case, I'd still like to find a way of typing this more efficiently

export type Mapper<T, U> = (value: T, index?: number, array?: T[]) => U;

type IsFunction<T> = T extends Function ? T & Function : never;

export function toField<T, U extends keyof T, V extends IsFunction<T[U]>>(
    key: U
): V extends Function ? Mapper<T, V extends () => infer R ? R : never> : never {
    return ((value: T) => (value[key] as V)()) as any;
}
1

Here's how I'd go about this:

function toField<K extends keyof any>(key: K) {
  return <T extends Record<K, () => any>>(value: T): ReturnType<T[K]> => value[key]();
}

Here, toField() is a generic function in K, the type of the key argument, which returns a generic function in T, the type of the value argument. T is constrained to types have a property with key K, whose property value at that key is a zero-argument function. That function returns a value of type ReturnType<T[K]>, where ReturnType<F> is defined in the standard library to be the type of the return type of a function type F.

Let's test it out:

class Test {
  x: string;
  constructor(x: string) {
    this.x = x;
  }

  getX(): string { return this.x; }
}

const y: Test[] = [new Test('hello')];
const strings = y.map(toField('getX')); // okay, string[]
const doesntWork = y.map(toField('x')); // error!
//                       ~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
// y.map() doesn't accept a toField('x'), since Test['x'] is not a zero arg fn

I assume it's better that y.map(toField('x')) should be a compile-time warning and not silently produce a value of type never[] at compile time. You don't want to pass toField('x') to y.map() at all.

A few more cases:

const thisWorks = toField('toLowerCase')("LOWERCASE");
const thisDoesnt = toField('charAt')("oops"); // error!
//                                   ~~~~~~
// "oops".charAt is a function but needs args 

You can call "LOWERCASE".toLowerCase(), but shouldn't can't call "oops".charAt().

Finally, note that your original typings really only worked in one line like arr.map(toField("xxx")) because it relied on contextual typing of arr.map() to infer the generic type parameters in toField(). You'd run into trouble doing this:

const getXField = toField('getX');
// const getXField: <T extends Record<"getX", () => any>>(value: T) => ReturnType<T["getX"]>
const stringsTwoStep = y.map(getXField); // okay, string[]

For your original code, the first line would be an error because it would fail to infer anything for T, default to {} or unknown, and then end up constraining U to never, and 'getX' is not assignable to never. Blegh. But in the above code there's no difference between calling it in one line or splitting it into two.

Okay, hope that helps. Good luck!

Link to code

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