2

I've been not using Bison for a long time, so there is a chance I'm missing something simple here, however, I cannot figure out why the following grammar produces shift / reduce conflicts. I think the following grammar is not ambiguous. It's purpose is to parse expressions like:

a b
  c d
    e f
  g h

as (in pseudo-AST):

App 
    (App a b) 
    (Seq 
        [ App 
              (App c d) 
              (Seq [App e f])
        , (App g h)
        ]
    )

The grammar:

%token <Token> VAR
%token <Token> EOL

%token <Token> INDENT_INC
%token <Token> INDENT_DEC

%token <AST> CONS
%token <AST> WILDCARD
%type  <AST> expr
%type  <AST> subExpr
%type  <AST> block
%type  <AST> tok

%start program

%%
program:
  expr { result = $1; }

expr:
  subExpr  {$$=$1;}
| subExpr EOL INDENT_INC block { $$ = AST.app($1,$3); } 

subExpr:
  tok          {$$=$1;}
| subExpr tok  {$$ = AST.app($1,$2); } 

block:
  expr  {$$=$1;}
| block EOL expr {$$=AST.seq($1,$3);} // causes error

tok:
  VAR { $$ = AST.fromToken($1); }
%%

The error is just 2 shift/reduce conflicts. When debugging the parser, we can observe:

Grammar

    0 $accept: program $end
    1 program: expr
    2 expr: subExpr
    3     | subExpr EOL INDENT_INC block
    4 subExpr: tok
    5        | subExpr tok
    6 block: expr
    7      | block EOL expr
    8 tok: VAR

[...]

State 4

    2 expr: subExpr .
    3     | subExpr . EOL INDENT_INC block
    5 subExpr: subExpr . tok

    VAR  shift, and go to state 1
    EOL  shift, and go to state 7

    EOL       [reduce using rule 2 (expr)]
    $default  reduce using rule 2 (expr)

    tok  go to state 8

[...]

State 11

    3 expr: subExpr EOL INDENT_INC block .
    7 block: block . EOL expr

    EOL  shift, and go to state 12

    EOL       [reduce using rule 3 (expr)]
    $default  reduce using rule 3 (expr)

And to be honest, I'm not convinced where the ambiguity comes from. I'd be thankful for any help on how to remove the conflicts in such a grammar.

0

1 Answer 1

3

Your grammar does not use INDENT_DEC; without that, you cannot know where an indented block ends.

In effect, that's what those shift/reduce conflicts are telling you. Since the grammar doesn't see INDENT_DEC, it cannot distinguish between the EOL which separates two exprs in the same block and the EOL which terminates a block. Thus, an EOL is ambiguous (provided at least one INDENT_INC has been seen).

Here's a simple demonstration of ambiguity. The expression to parse is:

a EOL INDENT_INC b EOL INDENT_INC c EOL d

Here are two leftmost derivations, which differ in where d is nested (I condensed the subexpr ⇒ var ⇒ TOK path for simplicity):

# Here, d belongs to the outer subexpr (effectively, a single indent)
expr ⇒ subexpr EOL INDENT_INC block
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC block
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC block                          EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC expr                           EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC subexpr EOL INDENT_INC block   EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC subexpr EOL INDENT_INC expr    EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC subexpr EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (c) EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (c) EOL subexpr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (c) EOL TOK (d)

# Here, d belongs to the inner subexpr (effectively two indents)
expr ⇒ subexpr EOL INDENT_INC block
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC block
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC subexpr EOL INDENT_INC block
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC block
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC block   EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC expr    EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC subexpr EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (c) EOL expr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (c) EOL subexpr
     ⇒ TOK (a) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (b) EOL INDENT_INC TOK (c) EOL TOK (d)

So the grammar really is ambiguous. But the shift/reduce conflicts don't directly point at the ambiguity. They point at the problem of deciding whether or not to reduce the construct before the EOL without seeing the symbol following the EOL. This is the essence of the LR(1) restriction: Every reduction must be made before shifting the next symbol, so even if a grammar would be unambiguous if you could see far enough into the future it will still have shift/reduce conflicts if the reduction decision could go either way.

3
  • Thank you, I was suspecting something along these lines (that’s why I mentioned INDENT_DEC in the code), but now I don’t really understand how it relates to the Bison algorithm. I understand that we are limited to a single lookahead token, but still I feel we should not need the INDENT_DEC to disambiguate the grammar. When we get EOL we shift it. Then we can inspect the next token. If on the lookahead position there is INDENT_INC, the only possible reduction is “expr”. Otherwise, the only possible reduction is “block”. So why Bison cannot decide it? Jun 6, 2019 at 8:38
  • @WojciechDanilo: I edited the answer to illustrate the ambiguity and to offer an explanation of why you can't just shift EOL (because you might need to reduce the phrase before the EOL before you see the token following it).
    – rici
    Jun 6, 2019 at 16:28
  • thank you so much for your time and such a detailed explanation. It makes now perfect sense and also it's very clear to me why it's ambiguous. I don't know why I did not realize it earlier – after your explanation, it's "obvious"! Rici, thank you a thousand times! Jun 6, 2019 at 20:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.