7

In C++ I can't use a method if I declare it after the calling method.

Does this order matter in other languages like Java or C#?

1
  • 1
    Please post separate Questions for Java and C#. In its current form, your inquiry is too broad for Stack Overflow.
    – Cœur
    Nov 22, 2017 at 6:06

12 Answers 12

32

Declaration order of methods never matters in C# or Java. Likewise it doesn't matter whether you declare a method before or after a variable that it uses.

Declaration order of variables can matter, however, when they're initialized one depends on another. For example (C#):

using System;

class Test
{
    static int x = 5;
    static int y = x;

    static void Main()
    {
        // Prints x=5 y=5
        Console.WriteLine("x={0} y={1}", x, y);
    }
}

but:

using System;

class Test
{
    static int y = x;
    static int x = 5;

    static void Main()
    {
        // Prints x=5 y=0
        Console.WriteLine("x={0} y={1}", x, y);
    }
}

Java prevents this exact situation, but it's easy to mimic:

public class Test
{
    static int y = getInitialValue();
    static int x = 5;

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        System.out.println("x=" + x + " y=" + y);
    }

    static int getInitialValue()
    {
        return x;
    }
}

In C# things become even more confusing when you involve partial classes. Initialization occurs in textual order in C#, but that order isn't fully defined when you have multiple files contributing to the same class.

Needless to say, avoid this wherever you possibly can!

27

No .

7
  • 5
    Nothing like being short and succinct. Feb 19, 2009 at 10:45
  • 2
    No, would have been more then enough. It is afterall a Yes/No question.
    – chrissie1
    Feb 19, 2009 at 11:42
  • 3
    The space before the period is unnecessary and really clutters the answer. I suggest removing it to prevent confusing people with unnecessary fluff. Feb 19, 2009 at 13:37
  • 2
    I'm struggling to get rid of that white space. The minimum response length after trimming is 10 (probably for good reason). My answer is actually No_______. I', thinking about posting a StackOverflow question to see if anyone can help me.
    – Dan Fish
    Feb 19, 2009 at 13:56
  • 3
    without an explanation, this answer may become useless in case if someone else posts an opposite opinion. For example, if someone posts a claim like "Yes", how would this answer help reader to pick of two opposing opinions? Consider editing it into a better shape, to meet How to Answer guidelines
    – gnat
    Oct 6, 2016 at 6:22
5

No, the compiler does two passes.

2

In Java as well as in c# there is no separate method declaration.

The declaration of the method is done with its implementation. You also do not need to keep track of file includes so that the classes know about eachother as long as they are in the same namespace.

1

For Java, the authoritative answer is hidden in Chapter 1 (Introduction) of the Java Language Specification ("JLS," 3rd edition, viewable online for free):

Declaration order is significant only for local variables, local classes, and the order of initializers of fields in a class or interface.

0

I'm not sure about c#, but in java you can.

0

It doesn't in C#.

0

neither C# nor Java does.

0

The variable should be accessible in the method where it is being used. It does not matter if it is declared before or after the usage.

0

There is one tricky case where lexically the function to be called can be declared after the point of call, but not semantically. This is because the class is deemed to be completely defined in the body of the class member functions.

$9.2.2 - "A class is considered a completely-defined object type (3.9) (or complete type) at the closing } of the class-specifier. Within the class member-specification, the class is regarded as complete within function bodies, default arguments and constructor ctor-initializers (including such things in nested classes). Otherwise it is regarded as incomplete within its own class member-specification."

struct A{
    void f(){g();}    // OK to call 'g' even if the compiler has not seen 'g' as yet
    void g(){};
};

int main(){
    A a;
    a.f();
}
0

The order of methods/constructors does matter in Java in some corner cases:

class Callee {
    private static void bar(int i) { } // compilation error if first
    public static void bar(String s) { } // ok if this method is first
}

class Caller {
    private void foo() { Callee.bar(bar()); }
    private <T> T bar() { return null; }
}
0

These answers are conflicting which makes things difficult to understand. The best practice is to declare your methods, variables, etc. in a common sense chronological order so that there is no confusion and this is across all programming languages. Your main will always be first so that CAN be at the beginning or end, but still, you should start with main, and when you call a method in main it should be the next method after main and so on. This, at least to me, makes the most sense and makes the code the most readable (comments help a lot too, because let's face it, code is really gibberish). I'm not a coding expert, but I understand that the best practice with any algorithm is to break it down into as many simple steps as needed (please with comments). This doesn't make sense:

   final List<int[]> intArrays = Arrays.stream(testarray).collect(Collectors.toList());
   final List<Integer> integers = intArrays.stream().flatMap(z -> 
                  Arrays.stream(z).boxed()).collect(Collectors.toList());

unless you add comments like:
final List<int[]> intArrays = Arrays.stream(testarray).collect(Collectors.toList());
// this makes a List (of ints) variable type that cannot be changed based on the stream of 
//(the testarray in this case) and uses the Collector method to add the ints
//to intArrays (our variable name)
final List<Integer> integers = intArrays.stream().flatMap(z -> 
                  Arrays.stream(z).boxed()).collect(Collectors.toList());
// I would have to look this up, because I honestly have no clue what it does exactly. 

Like I said, code is basically gibberish. Help yourself and anyone else that might look at your code and write it in a logical order no matter what language you use. (And again, please use comments! You'll thank me later.)

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