Actually I want to read the contents that come after the search query, when it is done. The problem is that the URL only accepts POST methods, and it does not take any action with GET method...

I have to read all contents with the help of domdocument or file_get_contents(). Is there any method that will let me send parameters with POST method and then read the contents via PHP?

11 Answers 11

CURL-less method with PHP5:

$url = 'http://server.com/path';
$data = array('key1' => 'value1', 'key2' => 'value2');

// use key 'http' even if you send the request to https://...
$options = array(
    'http' => array(
        'header'  => "Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded\r\n",
        'method'  => 'POST',
        'content' => http_build_query($data)
    )
);
$context  = stream_context_create($options);
$result = file_get_contents($url, false, $context);
if ($result === FALSE) { /* Handle error */ }

var_dump($result);

See the PHP manual for more information on the method and how to add headers, for example:

  • 48
    It's worth noting that if you decide to use an array for the headers, do NOT end the keys or values with '\r\n'. stream_context_create() will only take the text up to the first '\r\n' – raptor May 23 '13 at 14:58
  • 7
    A URL can be used as a filename with file_get_contents() only if the fopen wrappers have been enabled. See php.net/manual/en/… – Pino Nov 27 '13 at 14:05
  • 3
    @I love file_get_contents() – deadlock Dec 1 '13 at 13:05
  • 11
    Is there a specific reason for not using CURL? – jvannistelrooy Aug 31 '15 at 14:54
  • 20
    @jvannistelrooy CURL for PHP is an extension which may not exist in all environments whereas file_get_contents() is part of PHP's core. Also, using an extension unnecessarily can widen the attack surface of your app. E.g. Google php curl cve – Pocketsand Oct 12 '16 at 7:54

You could use cURL:

<?php
//The url you wish to send the POST request to
$url = $file_name;

//The data you want to send via POST
$fields = [
    '__VIEWSTATE '      => $state,
    '__EVENTVALIDATION' => $valid,
    'btnSubmit'         => 'Submit'
];

//url-ify the data for the POST
$fields_string = http_build_query($fields);

//open connection
$ch = curl_init();

//set the url, number of POST vars, POST data
curl_setopt($ch,CURLOPT_URL, $url);
curl_setopt($ch,CURLOPT_POST, count($fields));
curl_setopt($ch,CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, $fields_string);

//So that curl_exec returns the contents of the cURL; rather than echoing it
curl_setopt($ch,CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true); 

//execute post
$result = curl_exec($ch);
echo $result;
?>
  • 3
    this one worked for me because the page I am sending to a page that has no content so the file_get_contents version didn't work. – CommentLuv Oct 27 '12 at 18:47
  • 7
    file_get_contents solution doesn't work on PHP configurations with allow_url_fopen Off (like in shared hosting). This version uses curl library and I think is most "universal" so I give you my vote – Dayron Gallardo Aug 26 '14 at 11:42
  • 53
    You didn't site where you copied this code sample from: davidwalsh.name/curl-post – efreed May 18 '15 at 18:06
  • 3
    Although it is not very important, the CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS parameter data actually doesn't need to be converted to a string ("urlified"). Quote: "This parameter can either be passed as a urlencoded string like 'para1=val1&para2=val2&...' or as an array with the field name as key and field data as value. If value is an array, the Content-Type header will be set to multipart/form-data." Link: php.net/manual/en/function.curl-setopt.php. – Edward Mar 23 '16 at 16:00
  • 2
    Also, no offence for writing it differently, but I don't know why the CURLOPT_POST parameter is specified as a number here as it says to set it to a boolean on the manual page. Quote: "CURLOPT_POST: TRUE to do a regular HTTP POST." Link: php.net/manual/en/function.curl-setopt.php. – Edward Mar 23 '16 at 16:04

I use the following function to post data using curl. $data is an array of fields to post (will be correctly encoded using http_build_query). The data is encoded using application/x-www-form-urlencoded.

function httpPost($url, $data)
{
    $curl = curl_init($url);
    curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_POST, true);
    curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, http_build_query($data));
    curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
    $response = curl_exec($curl);
    curl_close($curl);
    return $response;
}

@Edward mentions that http_build_query may be omitted since curl will correctly encode array passed to CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS parameter, but be advised that in this case the data will be encoded using multipart/form-data.

I use this function with APIs that expect data to be encoded using application/x-www-form-urlencoded. That's why I use http_build_query().

  • Passing array to CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS causes data to be encoded using multipart/form-data which may not be desirable. – Dima L. Mar 25 at 16:26
  • The user did ask for file_get_contents, so he needs a solution for changing the default_stream_context – Radon8472 Aug 1 at 11:18

I recommend you to use the open-source package guzzle that is fully unit tested and uses the latest coding practices.

Installing Guzzle

Go to the command line in your project folder and type in the following command (assuming you already have the package manager composer installed). If you need help how to install Composer, you should have a look here.

php composer.phar require guzzlehttp/guzzle

Using Guzzle to send a POST request

The usage of Guzzle is very straight forward as it uses a light-weight object-oriented API:

// Initialize Guzzle client
$client = new GuzzleHttp\Client();

// Create a POST request
$response = $client->request(
    'POST',
    'http://example.org/',
    [
        'form_params' => [
            'key1' => 'value1',
            'key2' => 'value2'
        ]
    ]
);

// Parse the response object, e.g. read the headers, body, etc.
$headers = $response->getHeaders();
$body = $response->getBody();

// Output headers and body for debugging purposes
var_dump($headers, $body);
  • 5
    It would be useful to know what advantages this has over the native PHP solution already posted, and the cURL one too. – artfulrobot Dec 6 '16 at 11:01
  • 6
    @artfulrobot: The native PHP-solution has lots of problems (e.g. connecting with https, certificate verification, etc.pp.), which is why almost every PHP developer uses cURL. And why not use cURL in this case? It's simple: Guzzle has a straight-forward, easy, light-weight interface which abstracts all those "low-level cURL handling problems" away. Almost everyone developing modern PHP uses Composer anyway, so using Guzzle is just really simple. – Andreas Dec 6 '16 at 11:47
  • 2
    Thanks, I know guzzle is popular, however there are use cases when composer causes grief (e.g. developing plugins for bigger software projects that might already use a (different version) of guzzle or other dependencies), so it's good to know this info to make a decision about which solution will be most robust – artfulrobot Dec 6 '16 at 11:53

There's another CURL method if you are going that way.

This is pretty straightforward once you get your head around the way the PHP curl extension works, combining various flags with setopt() calls. In this example I've got a variable $xml which holds the XML I have prepared to send - I'm going to post the contents of that to example's test method.

$url = 'http://api.example.com/services/xmlrpc/';
$ch = curl_init($url);

curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POST, 1);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, $xml);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);

$response = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);
//process $response

First we initialised the connection, then we set some options using setopt(). These tell PHP that we are making a post request, and that we are sending some data with it, supplying the data. The CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER flag tells curl to give us the output as the return value of curl_exec rather than outputting it. Then we make the call and close the connection - the result is in $response.

  • 1
    in the 3rd curl_setopt() call, the first arg should be $ch not $curl, correct? – jcomeau_ictx Aug 30 '16 at 4:07
  • Can you use this same code to POST JSON data? But replace $xml with say $json (where $json is probably a JSON string?) – Neal Davis Oct 28 at 19:47

If you by any chance are using Wordpress to develop your app (it's actually a convenient way to get authorization, info pages etc even for very simple stuff), you can use the following snippet:

$response = wp_remote_post( $url, array('body' => $parameters));

if ( is_wp_error( $response ) ) {
    // $response->get_error_message()
} else {
    // $response['body']
}

It uses different ways of making the actual HTTP request, depending on what is available on the web server. For more details, see the HTTP API documentation.

If you don't want to develop a custom theme or plugin to start the Wordpress engine, you can just do the following in an isolated PHP file in the wordpress root:

require_once( dirname(__FILE__) . '/wp-load.php' );

// ... your code

It won't show any theme or output any HTML, just hack away with the Wordpress APIs!

I'd like to add some thoughts about the curl-based answer of Fred Tanrikut. I know most of them are already written in the answers above, but I think it is a good idea to show an answer that includes all of them together.

Here is the class I wrote to make HTTP-GET/POST/PUT/DELETE requests based on curl, concerning just about the response body:

class HTTPRequester {
    /**
     * @description Make HTTP-GET call
     * @param       $url
     * @param       array $params
     * @return      HTTP-Response body or an empty string if the request fails or is empty
     */
    public static function HTTPGet($url, array $params) {
        $query = http_build_query($params); 
        $ch    = curl_init($url.'?'.$query);
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HEADER, false);
        $response = curl_exec($ch);
        curl_close($ch);
        return $response;
    }
    /**
     * @description Make HTTP-POST call
     * @param       $url
     * @param       array $params
     * @return      HTTP-Response body or an empty string if the request fails or is empty
     */
    public static function HTTPPost($url, array $params) {
        $query = http_build_query($params);
        $ch    = curl_init();
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HEADER, false);
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL, $url);
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POST, true);
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, $query);
        $response = curl_exec($ch);
        curl_close($ch);
        return $response;
    }
    /**
     * @description Make HTTP-PUT call
     * @param       $url
     * @param       array $params
     * @return      HTTP-Response body or an empty string if the request fails or is empty
     */
    public static function HTTPPut($url, array $params) {
        $query = \http_build_query($params);
        $ch    = \curl_init();
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_HEADER, false);
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_URL, $url);
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_CUSTOMREQUEST, 'PUT');
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, $query);
        $response = \curl_exec($ch);
        \curl_close($ch);
        return $response;
    }
    /**
     * @category Make HTTP-DELETE call
     * @param    $url
     * @param    array $params
     * @return   HTTP-Response body or an empty string if the request fails or is empty
     */
    public static function HTTPDelete($url, array $params) {
        $query = \http_build_query($params);
        $ch    = \curl_init();
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_HEADER, false);
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_URL, $url);
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_CUSTOMREQUEST, 'DELETE');
        \curl_setopt($ch, \CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, $query);
        $response = \curl_exec($ch);
        \curl_close($ch);
        return $response;
    }
}

Improvements

  • Using http_build_query to get the query-string out of an request-array.(you could also use the array itself, therefore see: http://php.net/manual/en/function.curl-setopt.php)
  • Returning the response instead of echoing it. Btw you can avoid the returning by removing the line curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);. After that the return value is a boolean(true = request was successful otherwise an error occured) and the response is echoed. See: http://php.net/en/manual/function.curl-exec.php
  • Clean session closing and deletion of the curl-handler by using curl_close. See: http://php.net/manual/en/function.curl-close.php
  • Using boolean values for the curl_setopt function instead of using any number.(I know that any number not equal zero is also considered as true, but the usage of true generates a more readable code, but that's just my opinion)
  • Ability to make HTTP-PUT/DELETE calls(useful for RESTful service testing)

Example of usage

GET

$response = HTTPRequester::HTTPGet("http://localhost/service/foobar.php", array("getParam" => "foobar"));

POST

$response = HTTPRequester::HTTPPost("http://localhost/service/foobar.php", array("postParam" => "foobar"));

PUT

$response = HTTPRequester::HTTPPut("http://localhost/service/foobar.php", array("putParam" => "foobar"));

DELETE

$response = HTTPRequester::HTTPDelete("http://localhost/service/foobar.php", array("deleteParam" => "foobar"));

Testing

You can also make some cool service tests by using this simple class.

class HTTPRequesterCase extends TestCase {
    /**
     * @description test static method HTTPGet
     */
    public function testHTTPGet() {
        $requestArr = array("getLicenses" => 1);
        $url        = "http://localhost/project/req/licenseService.php";
        $this->assertEquals(HTTPRequester::HTTPGet($url, $requestArr), '[{"error":false,"val":["NONE","AGPL","GPLv3"]}]');
    }
    /**
     * @description test static method HTTPPost
     */
    public function testHTTPPost() {
        $requestArr = array("addPerson" => array("foo", "bar"));
        $url        = "http://localhost/project/req/personService.php";
        $this->assertEquals(HTTPRequester::HTTPPost($url, $requestArr), '[{"error":false}]');
    }
    /**
     * @description test static method HTTPPut
     */
    public function testHTTPPut() {
        $requestArr = array("updatePerson" => array("foo", "bar"));
        $url        = "http://localhost/project/req/personService.php";
        $this->assertEquals(HTTPRequester::HTTPPut($url, $requestArr), '[{"error":false}]');
    }
    /**
     * @description test static method HTTPDelete
     */
    public function testHTTPDelete() {
        $requestArr = array("deletePerson" => array("foo", "bar"));
        $url        = "http://localhost/project/req/personService.php";
        $this->assertEquals(HTTPRequester::HTTPDelete($url, $requestArr), '[{"error":false}]');
    }
}
  • For me, it says "Uncaught Error: Call to undefined method HTTPRequester::HTTPost()". I have simply pasted your class into my .php file. Anything else I need to do? – LinusGeffarth Feb 4 at 18:54
  • 1
    Can you please post your code? It's pretty hard to guess what's wrong without any code snippet. – mwatzer Feb 13 at 23:52
  • As I said, I've literally copied yours into my plain php file and it gave me this error. – LinusGeffarth Feb 14 at 1:27
  • 1
    Ok now I see the issue,.. it was wrong in the example! You have to call HTTPRequester::HTTPPost() instead of HTTPRequester::HTTPost() – mwatzer Mar 6 at 8:59
  • 1
    Ah. That one's easy to miss. I had to read your comment like 5x before I spotted the extra P. Thanks! – LinusGeffarth Mar 6 at 9:24

Another alternative of the curl-less method above is to use the native stream functions:

  • stream_context_create():

    Creates and returns a stream context with any options supplied in options preset.

  • stream_get_contents():

    Identical to file_get_contents(), except that stream_get_contents() operates on an already open stream resource and returns the remaining contents in a string, up to maxlength bytes and starting at the specified offset.

A POST function with these can simply be like this:

<?php

function post_request($url, array $params) {
  $query_content = http_build_query($params);
  $fp = fopen($url, 'r', FALSE, // do not use_include_path
    stream_context_create([
    'http' => [
      'header'  => [ // header array does not need '\r\n'
        'Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded',
        'Content-Length: ' . strlen($query_content)
      ],
      'method'  => 'POST',
      'content' => $query_content
    ]
  ]));
  if ($fp === FALSE) {
    fclose($fp);
    return json_encode(['error' => 'Failed to get contents...']);
  }
  $result = stream_get_contents($fp); // no maxlength/offset
  fclose($fp);
  return $result;
}

I was looking for a similar problem and found a better approach of doing this. So here it goes.

You can simply put the following line on the redirection page (say page1.php).

header("Location: URL", TRUE, 307); // Replace URL with to be redirected URL, e.g. final.php

I need this to redirect POST requests for REST API calls. This solution is able to redirect with post data as well as custom header values.

Here is the reference link.

  • This answers how to redirect a page request not How do I send a POST request with PHP? Sure this would forward any POST parameters but that is not at all the same thing – DelightedD0D Nov 4 '16 at 1:46
  • @DelightedD0D, Sorry I did not get the difference between redirect a page request with POST param vs send POST request. For me purpose of both is same, correct me if I am wrong. – Arindam Nayak Nov 4 '16 at 7:00
  • Is there any method that will let me send parameters with POST method and then read the contents via PHP? The OP wants thier php script to construct a set of POST parameters and send them to another php page and for their script to receive the output from that page . This solution would simply accept an already POSTed set of values and forward them to another page. They are pretty different. – DelightedD0D Nov 4 '16 at 7:48

There is one more which you can use

<?php
$fields = array(
    'name' => 'mike',
    'pass' => 'se_ret'
);
$files = array(
    array(
        'name' => 'uimg',
        'type' => 'image/jpeg',
        'file' => './profile.jpg',
    )
);

$response = http_post_fields("http://www.example.com/", $fields, $files);
?>

Click here for details

  • 1
    This relies on a PECL extension which most will not have installed. Not even sure it's still available, as the manual pages have been removed. – miken32 May 11 '16 at 17:14

Try PEAR's HTTP_Request2 package to easily send POST requests. Alternatively, you can use PHP's curl functions or use a PHP stream context.

HTTP_Request2 also makes it possible to mock out the server, so you can unit-test your code easily

  • 6
    I'd like to see you to elaborate it, if possible. – Gui Imamura Sep 22 '15 at 17:49

protected by Brad Larson Feb 18 '15 at 21:17

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