31

I have a view function:

@transaction.commit_manually
def xyz(request):
    if ABC:
        success = something()

        if success:
            status = "success"
            transaction.commit()

        else:
            status = "dataerrors"
            transaction.rollback()
    else:
        status = "uploadproblem"
        transaction.rollback()

    return render(request, "template.html", {
        'status': status,
    })

I believe every code path ends the transaction one way or another. But Django seems to be complaining that it doesn't. Any ideas?

Django Version:     1.3
Exception Type:     TransactionManagementError
Exception Value:    Transaction managed block ended with pending COMMIT/ROLLBACK

EDIT: No other exceptions are being thrown to alter the code path.

  • are you using postgres? These might be relevant: here and here – dting Apr 13 '11 at 12:08
  • 1
    Yes, ABC is defined sorry. Over enthusiastic source-cleaning! – Joe Apr 13 '11 at 12:57

10 Answers 10

86

After getting a similar issue and wasting hours on it I figured out how to debug this situation.

For some reason the @transaction.commit_manually decorator silences exceptions that occur in the function.

Temporarily remove the decorator from your function, you'll now see the exception, fix it and put the decorator back!

  • 1
    This advice is spot on! that @transaction.commit_manually decorator was eating the true problem. – boatcoder Dec 21 '11 at 3:56
  • You also saved me many hours. This behavior is very odd. I'm using commit_on_success decorator and it does not behave the same way. – duduklein Jun 14 '12 at 14:50
  • The strange things is that doing a 1/0 shows a correct exception :( – Anders Rune Jensen Jul 20 '12 at 12:40
  • When I removed this decorator, my code simply runs fine! No errors nothing. Clean commits! But I am worried as I cant put this code into production without checking for the transaction was successful or not. Any ideas? – Indradhanush Gupta Jul 3 '13 at 19:40
  • This is such a stupid, stupid problem, and it makes manual transaction handling basically garbage (can't debug any runtime errors, development is a nightmare, etc., etc.). – orokusaki Mar 4 '14 at 14:56
9

I had the same problem. The only solution I found was to use a try/finally clause to ensure a commit happens after the render.

@transaction.commit_manually
def xyz(request):
    committed = False
    try:
        if ABC:
            success = something()

            if success:
                status = "success"
                transaction.commit()
                committed = True

            else:
                status = "dataerrors"
                transaction.rollback()
                committed = True
        else:
            status = "uploadproblem"
            transaction.rollback()
            committed = True

        return render(request, "template.html", {
            'status': status,
        })
    finally:
        if not committed:
            transaction.rollback() # or .commit() depending on your error-handling logic

Makes no sense, but it worked for me.

  • This worked for me. Also, I found that if I wanted to rollback as part of a normal flow (not an exception) then I had to create an exception (x = 1/0) to make sure that I ended up in a finally with a rollback. Perhaps because my whole function is in a try catch. – user984003 Oct 22 '12 at 12:57
  • 3
    This is a good solution, but instead of using the variable commited you could use transaction.is_dirty(). if you can, check the django transaction middleware, they do the exact same. – Hassek Jan 30 '14 at 0:33
2

I had the same issue and learned that even if you properly close the transaction manually in case of exceptions, if you then write to the orm again within the manual-transaction scope, it seems to reopen the transaction somehow and causes the transaction exception.

            with transaction.commit_manually():
                try:
                    <exciting stuff>
                    transaction.commit()                        
                except Exception, e:
                    transaction.rollback()
                    o.error='failed' <== caused transaction exception
2

another reason why you might be seeing this issue is when you have multiple db's in the system.

I was able to overcome this error with

@transaction.commit_manually(using='my_other_db')
def foo():
   try:
        <db query>
        transaction.commit(using='my_other_db')
   except:
        transaction.rollback(using='my_other_db')
1

This always happens when an unhandled exception occurs somewhere in the code. In my case, for some reason, the exception was not thrown to the debugger which is what caused the confusion for me.

  • This is what I suspect. But if there is an exception, I am unable to see it, and I have tried! In the end I decided to solve the problem a different way to transactions, and with my new approach I'm not seeing the exception I would have expected to see. – Joe Apr 15 '11 at 15:35
1

I had similar problem, maybe this code works fine for you:

@transaction.commit_on_success
def xyz(request):
    if ABC:
        success = something()

        if success:
            status = "success"

        else:
            status = "dataerrors"
            transaction.rollback()
    else:
        status = "uploadproblem"
        transaction.rollback()

    return render(request, "template.html", {
        'status': status,
    })
1

As other people have said, exceptions occurring within the decorated function are "lost" because they are overwritten by the TransactionManagementError exception.

I propose to extend the transaction.commit_manually decorator. My decorator transaction_commit_manually uses the transaction.commit_manually decorator internally; if an exception occurs in the decorated function, my decorator catches the exception, performs a transaction.rollback() and raises the exception again. Thus the transaction is cleared correctly, and the original exception is not lost.

def _create_decorator_transaction_commit_manually(using=None):
    def deco(f):
        def g(*args, **kwargs):
            try:
                out = f(*args, **kwargs)
            except Exception as e:
                if using is not None:
                    transaction.rollback(using=using)
                else:
                    transaction.rollback()
                raise e
            return out
        if using is not None:
            return transaction.commit_manually(using=using)(g)
        return transaction.commit_manually(g)
    return deco

def transaction_commit_manually(*args, **kwargs):
    """
    Improved transaction.commit_manually that does not hide exceptions.

    If an exception occurs, rollback work and raise exception again
    """
    # If 'using' keyword is provided, return a decorator
    if 'using' in kwargs:
        return _create_decorator_transaction_commit_manually(using=kwargs['using'])
    # If 'using' keyword is not provided, act as a decorator:
    # first argument is function to be decorated; return modified function
    f = args[0]
    deco = _create_decorator_transaction_commit_manually()
    return deco(f)
0

Put your code in try /except block .In except block just do a transaction.rollback and log the exception object.

@transaction.commit_manually
def xyz(xyz):
   try:
       some_logic
       transaction.commit()
    except Exception,e:
       transaction.rollback()
       print str(e)
  • Are you sure this is compatible with the points raised by the accepted answer? – Joe Feb 27 '15 at 17:20
0

I was having the same problem and tried various approaches. Here is what worked for me but i am not sure if this is the right way to do it. Change your return statement to:

with transaction.commit_on_success():
    return render(request, "template.html", {
        'status': status,
    })

Django Pros, is this the right approach?

0

Take backup of database if needed and remove table ROLLBACK_TEST from your database.

mysql> DROP TABLE `ROLLBACK_TEST`;

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