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I have a polygon which is oriented counter clock wise. I am trying to figure out what the bisectors are for each adjacent edge. I have come up with a solution, but I am wondering if this is the most efficient way ...

I need to check the interior angle. Is it bigger or smaller then pi. I need to do this, because I need to flip either the incoming vector, or the outgoing vector.

The question basically is: is there a more efficient way to determine if the interior angle > pi (or 180deg)?

The procedure in javascript I have now is this:

export const getBisectors = (polygon) => {
    //get bisectors, including length based on the unit normal vectors of the edges (inward)
    let bisectors = [];
    let prevPoint = polygon[polygon.length - 1];

    polygon.forEach((p, i) => {
        let nextPoint = i === polygon.length - 1 ? polygon[0] : polygon[i + 1];

        //vector going to p
        let v1 = normalizeVector({ x: p.x - prevPoint.x, y : p.y - prevPoint.y });
        let radIn = Math.acos(v1.x);
        if (v1.y < 0) radIn = TwoPI - radIn;

        // vector to next point
        let v2 = normalizeVector({ x: nextPoint.x - p.x, y : nextPoint.y - p.y });
        let radOut = Math.acos(v2.x);
        if (v2.y < 0) radOut = TwoPI - radOut;

        let rotation = radIn - radOut;
        if (rotation < 0) rotation += TwoPI; 

        if (rotation > Math.PI) {
            //invert outgoing
            v2 = multiply(v2, -1);
        } else {
            //invert incoming
            v1 = multiply(v1, -1);
        }
        let bisector = addVectors(v1, v2);

        bisectors.push({bisector: bisector, p : p  });
        prevPoint = p;
    });
    return bisectors;
}

After the partial answer I ended up with the following method:

export const getIntersection = (p1, v1, p2, v2) => {
    //find s
    //p1 + s * v1 == p2 + t * v2
    var denominator = cross(v1, v2);

    if (Math.abs(denominator) < epsilon) {
        return p1;
    }

    var s = (p2.x * v2.y + p1.y * v2.x - p2.y * v2.x - p1.x * v2.y) / denominator;
    return {x : p1.x + s * v1.x, y : p1.y + s * v1.y};
}

function getBisector(prevPoint, point, nextPoint) {
    let v1 = { x: point.x - prevPoint.x, y : point.y - prevPoint.y };
    let n1 = normalizeVector( { x: v1.y, y : -( v1.x ) } )
    let n2 = normalizeVector( { x: (nextPoint.y - point.y), y : -(nextPoint.x - point.x) } )

    let bisector = addVectors(n1, n2);    
    let i = getIntersection(point, bisector, addVectors(prevPoint, n1), v1);

    return {x : i.x - point.x, y : i.y - point.y};
}

and some examples: bisectors 5-shape

enter image description here

2 Answers 2

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let v1 = normalizeVector({ x: p.x - prevPoint.x, y : p.y - prevPoint.y });
let v2 = normalizeVector({ x: nextPoint.x - p.x, y : nextPoint.y - p.y });

k = v1.x * v2.y - v1.y * v2.x;

if (k < 0){
   //the angle is greater than pi, invert outgoing, 
   //ready to get interior bisector 
   v2 = multiply(v2, -1);  
}
else{
   //the angle is less than pi, invert incoming, 
   v1 = multiply(v1, -1);
}

bisector = normalizeVector({ x: v1.x + v2.x, y : v1.y + v2.y });

Etit: Here is even faster code for generating interior bisector, without the use of any normals: Matlab code, which I tested. It generates the unit bisectors pointing in the interior of the polygon.

function  B = bisectors(P)

   %P is 2 x n matrix, column P(:,j) is a vertex of a polygon in the plane,
   %P is the ordered set of vertices of the polygon

   [~,n] = size(P); 
   B = zeros(2,n);

   for j=1:n

       if j == 1
          v_in = P(:,1) - P(:,n);
          v_out = P(:,2) - P(:,1);
       elseif j == n
          v_in = P(:,j) - P(:,j-1);
          v_out = P(:,1) - P(:,j);
       else
          v_in = P(:,j) - P(:,j-1);
          v_out = P(:,j+1) - P(:,j);
       end

       v_in = v_in/sqrt(v_in'*v_in); %normalize edge-vector
       v_out = v_out/sqrt(v_out'*v_out); %normalize edge-vector

       % bisector of the complementary angle at the vertex j, 
       % pointing counter clockwise and displacing the vertex so that
       % the resulting polygon is 1 unit inwards in normal direction:
       bisector = v_in + v_out; 
       bisector = bisector/abs(bisector'*v_in);

       % 90 degree counter clockwise rotation of complementary bisector:
       B(1,j) = - bisector(2);
       B(2,j) = bisector(1);

   end

end

And in your notation:

function getBisector(prevPoint, point, nextPoint) {

    let v1 = normalizeVector({ x : point.x - prevPoint.x, y : point.y - prevPoint.y });
    let v2 = normalizeVector({ x : nextPoint.x - point.x, y : nextPoint.y - point.y });


    let bisectorPerp = addVectors(v1, v2); 
    bisectorPerp = bisectorPerp / absoluteValue(dot(v1, bisectorPerp));   

    return {x : - (bisectorPerp.y), y : bisectorPerp.x};
}

This function returns bisectors of the same length as in your last function, without the need of the extra getIntersection function.

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  • Thanks I didn't check cross product ... a whole lot easier than calculating angles.
    – André
    Jun 7, 2019 at 9:57
  • After some testing, I found k > 0 is the check to make.
    – André
    Jun 7, 2019 at 10:13
  • Sorry, but I see an error in my thinking. you answered the queestion I had posted. But my question was incorrect. MBo answered the question I needed to solve.
    – André
    Jun 7, 2019 at 10:19
  • @André The check should be k < 0, I wrote my own test code and it works. Anyway, the other answer is indeed better. It constructs the inward angle bisectors faster. I guess your question was how to construct the inward pointing bisectors fast. Jun 7, 2019 at 15:24
  • @André I added an edit with even faster method for constructing the interior of angle bisectors, without the use of any normals :)... Jun 7, 2019 at 16:01
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enter image description here

For every pair of neighbor edges make direction vectors and build unit normals. I used left normals - suitable for CCW polygon, picture shows angle > Pi, calculations are the same for smaller angles.

a = P[i] - P[i-1]
b = P[i+1] - P[i]

na = (-a.y, a.x)  //left normal
na = na / Length(na)

nb = (-b.y, b.x)   
nb = nb / Length(nb)

bisector = na + nb  

If you need to make vertex with offset d:

bis = bisector / Length(bisector)

make length of bisector to provide needed distance as

l = d / Sqrt(1 + dotproduct(na,nb))

And find offset polygon vertex:

P' = P + l * bis
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  • Not the answer of the question I asked. But the answer to the question I had. Thanks.
    – André
    Jun 7, 2019 at 10:19
  • Changed the accepted answer, as Futurologist provided a method, inclusing a vector with correct length.
    – André
    Jun 8, 2019 at 12:51
  • @André But You did not ask about bisector length, so I wrote, then removed stuff about setting bisector length (picture contains d and l) ;)
    – MBo
    Jun 9, 2019 at 3:43
  • True, but all in all, counting the sqrt's in the solution makes me think, I currently think the solution provided by Futurologist I think that answer is slightly more elegant, both being correct ... I would accept both answers if I could...
    – André
    Jun 10, 2019 at 7:20

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