2

I am trying to find the lines in a file which non of the numbers in those lines are in their preceding line. This file has around 400000 lines. This is an example of the input file:

320 5120
240 326 5120
240 326 5120
241 333 514
240 326 5120
240 326 5120
320 5120
240
100 112
240 326 5120
240 326 5120
320 5120 

The expected output results is:

241 333 514
240 326 5120
240
100 112
240 326 5120

So far I could find this command:

$ awk '!seen[$1]++' file 

320 5120
240 326 5120
241 333 514
100 112

which I can get the unique number of column 1 and I can do the same separately for other columns. Can I somehow get the information I want from this command? Any help would be appreciated.

  • Why isn't your first line part of the desired output? It satisfies the criteria that non of the numbers in those lines are in their preceding line since there is no preceding line. – Ed Morton Jun 8 at 0:25
  • 1
    The first line is for time 0 and the next lines shows a property at different time so the next lines are important for this property. – Star Jun 8 at 0:34
1

Here is an awk solution:

$ awk 'NR>1{p=1; for (i=1;i<=NF;i++){if($i in a)p=0}} {delete a; for (i=1;i<=NF;i++)a[$i]} p' file
241 333 514
240 326 5120
240
100 112
240 326 5120

How it works

  • NR>1{...}

    Perform the commands in braces for all except the first line. Those commands are:

    • p=1

      Initialize p to true (nonzero)

    • for (i=1;i<=NF;i++){if($i in a)p=0}

      If any field is a key in array a, then set p to false (zero).

  • delete a

    Delete array a.

  • for (i=1;i<=NF;i++)a[$i]

    Create a key in array a for every field on the current line.

  • p

    If p is true, print the line.

Multiple line version

Or, for those who prefer their code spread over multiple lines:

awk '
    NR>1{
        p=1
        for (i=1;i<=NF;i++){
            if($i in a)p=0}
        }
    {
        delete a
        for (i=1;i<=NF;i++)
            a[$i]
    }

    p' file
  • Thank you for your useful answer! I modified my input example following a comment from Ed Morton and put numbers with 4 digit as well since in my real input there can be numbers with 1-7 digits. Now I need to change the generated output in your answer and others here accordingly. I tried to edit it but nothing has changed yet. – Star Jun 8 at 0:12
  • @Star I'm glad this worked for you. I modified the output to match the updated question. – John1024 Jun 8 at 4:33
3

A Perl command-line program ("one"-liner), assuming things other than numbers in the file

perl -wnE'
    @n = /([0-9]+)/g; 
    say "@n" if not grep { exists $seen_nums{$_} } @n; 
    %seen_nums = map { $_ => 1 } @n
' data.txt

This prints the desired output. It also prints the very first line (correctly). Since the program parses lines for numbers it can be used for files with headers, text-only (comment?) lines, etc.

But if the data is sure to have only numbers then we can use Perl's -a switch with which words on each line are available in the @F array. Also shrunk a little to actually fit on a line

perl -wlanE'grep exists $n{$_}, @F or say; %n = map { $_=>1 } @F' data.txt

A brief explanation of switches (see docs linked above)

  • -w turns on warnings

  • -l strips the newline, and can tack it back on, with few more subtleties

  • -a turns on "autosplit" (when used with -n or -p), so that @F is available in the program which contains words on the line. On newer Perls this sets -n as well

  • -n Critical for processing files or STDIN -- opens the resource and sets up a loop over lines. Run with -MO=Deparse to see what it does

  • -E The -e is what makes it evaluate everything between the following quotes as Perl code. With capital (E) it also turns on features, what I use mostly for say. (Doing this has drawbacks, since it enables all features and makes things not backwards compatible anymore.)


Note: The first line can be omitted by adding condition $.!=2 to the print

  • While I like your answer, your one-liner is written on 4 lines ;-) – kvantour Jun 7 at 10:43
  • Thank you! This is helpful. The input is a time dependent property and that's why the changes after the first line are important here but it's not a problem. I can just skip the first line from the generated output results. – Star Jun 7 at 11:12
  • @Star Glad that it helps :) I edited, for what may be more useful – zdim Jun 7 at 16:35
  • @kvantour Yes, I am always entertained by such "one"-liners ... their utility, of course, being that they demo an approach. (While that can go in a shell script as it stands.) I call them a "command-line program" (edited). Note that this also did what no other solution offered, that it works for a file which has data other than numbers (what can also serve as a check, exclude headers, etc). I guess that "subtlety" has been lost, and if I drop that I end up with a program that does fit in a line -- updated – zdim Jun 7 at 18:19
1

Here's a perl one-liner:

$ perl -M-warnings -lane 'print unless @F ~~ %prev; %prev = map { $_ => 1 } @F;' input.txt
320 512
241 333 514
240 326 512
240
100 112
240 326 512

It uses the frowned-upon smart match operator in the name of conciseness. With smartmatch, ARRAY ~~ HASH returns true if any elements of the array are keys in the hash, which is perfect for this use case. If this was a standalone script and not a one-liner I'd probably use a different approach, though.

(Is there a reason the first line of your sample input isn't in your expected output even though it meets the critera?)

  • Thank you! This is useful for me. I mentioned in the comments to @zdim that since this is a time dependent property the changes after the 1st line (time=0) are important so I didn't include that line. – Star Jun 7 at 11:19
1

Here is a perl solution that does that. It tests for any of the numbers were seen on the previous line.

This includes printing the first line as noted by Shawn which might be needed. If not, just exclude the print join(... line in the code.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use List::Util 'any';

open my $fh, '<', 'f0.txt' or die $!;

my @nums = split ' ', <$fh>;

my %seen = map{ $_ => 1} @nums;

print join(' ', @nums), "\n"; # print the first line

while (<$fh>) {
    @nums = split;
    print unless any {$seen{$_}} @nums;
    %seen = map{ $_ => 1} @nums;
}

close $fh or die $!;

Output is:

320 512
241 333 514
240 326 512
240
100 112
240 326 512
0

A simple awk that checks, by means of a regex-match if the number is in the previous line. The idea is:

  • the previous line is stored in variable t
  • if any of the fields is matched to the previous line, we can skip to the next line.

This is done in the following way:

$ awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;++i) if (FS t FS ~ FS $i FS) {t=$0; next}; t=$0}1'
320 512
241 333 514
240 326 512
240
100 112
240 326 512

The trick to make it work is to ensure that the line starts and stops with a field separator. If we would do the test t ~ $i we could match the number 25 against the number 255. But by ensuring that all numbers are sandwhiched between field separators, we can just do the test FS t FS ~ FS $i FS.

note: if you don't want the first line to be printed, replace the last 1 by (FNR>1)

0

Given your updated input:

$ awk '$0 !~ p; {gsub(/ /,"|"); p="(^| )("$0")( |$)"}' file
241 333 514
240 326 5120
240
100 112
240 326 5120

The above just converts the previous line read into a regexp like (^| )(320|5120)( |$) and then does a regexp comparison to see if the current line matches it and prints the current line if it doesn't match the modified previous line. This approach would only lead to false matches if your fields contained RE metacharacters which obviously yours don't since they're all-digits

  • Thank you for your answer but in my real input the number of digits are different and can be one digit or 5 digits. – Star Jun 7 at 15:44
  • OK, fix the example in your question to be more truly representative of your real input if you'd like help coming up with the best way to handle it. – Ed Morton Jun 7 at 15:45
  • I modified my input example but now in some answers the generated outputs are based on my previous input, I tried to edit them but I am not sure if I did it correctly since nothing have changed. – Star Jun 8 at 0:08
  • You accepted an answer to your question - that was the right thing to do if you're satisfied it's the best answer for you and then you should ask the provider of it follow-up questions if you have any. If that's not the case, though, then having an already accepted answer effectively stops other people from trying to provide an answer and/or wanting to be involved in a series of Q&A comments since you already have the answer you're going to use anyway. FWIW your accepted answer looks like it'd work for any number of digits per field. – Ed Morton Jun 8 at 0:16
  • yes I checked and it worked for my real input as well. – Star Jun 8 at 0:22

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