55

In my powershell script I'm creating one registry entry for each element I run script on and I would like to store some additional info about each element in registry (if you specify optional parameters once then by default use those params in the future).

The problem I've encountered is that I need to perform Test-RegistryValue (like here--see comment) but it doesn't seem to do the trick (it returns false even if entry exists). I tried to "build on top of it" and only thing I came up is this:

Function Test-RegistryValue($regkey, $name) 
{
    try
    {
        $exists = Get-ItemProperty $regkey $name -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
        Write-Host "Test-RegistryValue: $exists"
        if (($exists -eq $null) -or ($exists.Length -eq 0))
        {
            return $false
        }
        else
        {
            return $true
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        return $false
    }
}

That unfortunately also doesn't do what I need as it seems it always selects some (first?) value from the registry key.

Anyone has idea how to do this? It just seems too much to write managed code for this...

2
  • 6
    (Get-Item -Path $path).GetValue($value) -ne $null returns true if value exists.
    – dza
    Jun 7, 2016 at 13:57
  • new location of Test-RegistryValue script at "(like here)" link Oct 21, 2019 at 15:41

13 Answers 13

37

Personally, I do not like test functions having a chance of spitting out errors, so here is what I would do. This function also doubles as a filter that you can use to filter a list of registry keys to only keep the ones that have a certain key.

Function Test-RegistryValue {
    param(
        [Alias("PSPath")]
        [Parameter(Position = 0, Mandatory = $true, ValueFromPipeline = $true, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [String]$Path
        ,
        [Parameter(Position = 1, Mandatory = $true)]
        [String]$Name
        ,
        [Switch]$PassThru
    ) 

    process {
        if (Test-Path $Path) {
            $Key = Get-Item -LiteralPath $Path
            if ($Key.GetValue($Name, $null) -ne $null) {
                if ($PassThru) {
                    Get-ItemProperty $Path $Name
                } else {
                    $true
                }
            } else {
                $false
            }
        } else {
            $false
        }
    }
}
3
  • 5
    A bug: $Key.GetValue($Name, $null)) can get 0 or an empty string, i.e. a value exists but if ($Key.GetValue($Name, $null))) gets false and the script returns false, as if a value is missing. Also, I would recommend to use -LiteralPath instead of -Path everywhere. The task is about a single value test. Note that * and ? are rare but valid characters for registry names. Apr 13, 2011 at 17:42
  • $Key is a string here. It doesn't have a GetValue() method, hence I receive the following error Method invocation failed because [System.String] does not contain a method named 'GetValue'. Mar 15, 2021 at 22:03
  • In case it wasn't clear, I implemented Roman's suggestions. Jun 7, 2022 at 0:47
21

The best way to test if a registry value exists is to do just that - test for its existence. This is a one-liner, even if it's a little hard to read.

(Get-ItemProperty $regkey).PSObject.Properties.Name -contains $name

If you actually look up its data, then you run into the complication of how Powershell interprets 0.

3
  • 1
    You can make this nicer to read by incorporating Bronx' answer: (Get-Item $regkey).Property -contains $name
    – Grilse
    Aug 4, 2021 at 11:51
  • Checking the existing would be nice of get always a true if exist and a false if not. If the Registry Path did not exist, we get here an exception that need to be handled.
    – Butti
    Jun 15, 2022 at 5:53
  • 2
    This sample code will give you an exception, if the registry Path do not exist. A solution would be nice to get just a $false if the reg key is not there instead of partly get an exception.
    – Butti
    Jun 15, 2022 at 5:55
16

The Carbon PowerShell module has a Test-RegistryKeyValue function that will do this check for you. (Disclosure: I am the owner/maintainer of Carbon.)

You have to check that that the registry key exists, first. You then have to handle if the registry key has no values. Most of the examples here are actually testing the value itself, instead of the existence of the value. This will return false negatives if a value is empty or null. Instead, you have to test if a property for the value actually exists on the object returned by Get-ItemProperty.

Here's the code, as it stands today, from the Carbon module:

function Test-RegistryKeyValue
{
    <#
    .SYNOPSIS
    Tests if a registry value exists.

    .DESCRIPTION
    The usual ways for checking if a registry value exists don't handle when a value simply has an empty or null value.  This function actually checks if a key has a value with a given name.

    .EXAMPLE
    Test-RegistryKeyValue -Path 'hklm:\Software\Carbon\Test' -Name 'Title'

    Returns `True` if `hklm:\Software\Carbon\Test` contains a value named 'Title'.  `False` otherwise.
    #>
    [CmdletBinding()]
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [string]
        # The path to the registry key where the value should be set.  Will be created if it doesn't exist.
        $Path,

        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [string]
        # The name of the value being set.
        $Name
    )

    if( -not (Test-Path -Path $Path -PathType Container) )
    {
        return $false
    }

    $properties = Get-ItemProperty -Path $Path 
    if( -not $properties )
    {
        return $false
    }

    $member = Get-Member -InputObject $properties -Name $Name
    if( $member )
    {
        return $true
    }
    else
    {
        return $false
    }

}
13

One-liner:

$valueExists = (Get-Item $regKeyPath -EA Ignore).Property -contains $regValueName
1
  • Nice! By that I even don't need to check if a registry path exists (New-Item -Path "HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\Foo\Bar" -ErrorAction Ignore | Out-Null) and only need to check the existence of a key.
    – mgutt
    Nov 4, 2022 at 11:27
9

I would go with the function Get-RegistryValue. In fact it gets requested values (so that it can be used not only for testing). As far as registry values cannot be null, we can use null result as a sign of a missing value. The pure test function Test-RegistryValue is also provided.

# This function just gets $true or $false
function Test-RegistryValue($path, $name)
{
    $key = Get-Item -LiteralPath $path -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
    $key -and $null -ne $key.GetValue($name, $null)
}

# Gets the specified registry value or $null if it is missing
function Get-RegistryValue($path, $name)
{
    $key = Get-Item -LiteralPath $path -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
    if ($key) {
        $key.GetValue($name, $null)
    }
}

# Test existing value
Test-RegistryValue HKCU:\Console FontFamily
$val = Get-RegistryValue HKCU:\Console FontFamily
if ($val -eq $null) { 'missing value' } else { $val }

# Test missing value
Test-RegistryValue HKCU:\Console missing
$val = Get-RegistryValue HKCU:\Console missing
if ($val -eq $null) { 'missing value' } else { $val }

OUTPUT:

True
54
False
missing value
3
  • A word about errors (even with -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue errors are actually added to the $Error list). Assuming that we check potentially missing values of presumably existing keys there should not be too many errors in practice. Still, if such errors are unwanted then the code should look like if (Test-Path -LiteralPath $path) {...} else {...}. Apr 13, 2011 at 17:56
  • I voted and then tested :) It fails with simple test example: $regkey = "HKCU:\Software\Microsoft" $name = "myName1" $key = Get-Item -LiteralPath $path -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ERROR: Get-Item : Cannot bind argument to parameter 'LiteralPath' because it is null.
    – Newanja
    Apr 14, 2011 at 7:43
  • Perhaps you have already found your typo. You send the $path variable in Get-Item. But it is not defined in your piece of code: you define $regkey. So you should do Get-Item -LiteralPath $regkey. Apr 14, 2011 at 10:02
5

Probably an issue with strings having whitespace. Here's a cleaned up version that works for me:

Function Test-RegistryValue($regkey, $name) {
    $exists = Get-ItemProperty -Path "$regkey" -Name "$name" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
    If (($exists -ne $null) -and ($exists.Length -ne 0)) {
        Return $true
    }
    Return $false
}
2
  • Example use for anyone reading: Test-RegistryValue "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Classes\Installer\Dependencies\{f65db027-aff3-4070-886a-0d87064aabb1}" "DisplayName"
    – Luke
    Apr 7, 2017 at 10:27
  • 1
    ($exists -ne $null) -and ($exists.Length -ne 0) check fails when the property exists. I've found it best to use (-not $exists) instead
    – Luke
    Apr 7, 2017 at 11:59
3
$regkeypath= "HKCU:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run" 
$value1 = (Get-ItemProperty $regkeypath -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue).Zoiper -eq $null 
If ($value1 -eq $False) {
    Write-Host "Value Exist"
} Else {
    Write-Host "The value does not exist"
}
2
  • 1
    What is Zoiper?
    – dreamlax
    Mar 20, 2019 at 4:58
  • An example name to search on HKCU:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run Mar 11, 2021 at 21:03
2

If you are simply interested to know whether a registry value is present or not then how about:

[bool]((Get-itemproperty -Path "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion").PathName)

will return: $true while

[bool]((Get-itemproperty -Path "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion").ValueNotThere)

will return: $false as it's not there ;)

You could adapt it into a scriptblock like:

$CheckForRegValue = { Param([String]$KeyPath, [String]$KeyValue)
return [bool]((Get-itemproperty -Path $KeyPath).$KeyValue) }

and then just call it by:

& $CheckForRegValue "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" PathName

Have fun,

Porky

0

My version:

Function Test-RegistryValue($Key, $Name)
{
    (Get-ChildItem (Split-Path -Parent -Path $Key) | Where-Object {$_.PSChildName -eq (Split-Path -Leaf $Key)}).Property -contains $Name
}
0

My version, matching the exact text from the caught exception. It will return true if it's a different exception but works for this simple case. Also Get-ItemPropertyValue is new in PS 5.0

Function Test-RegValExists($Path, $Value){
$ee = @() # Exception catcher
try{
    Get-ItemPropertyValue -Path $Path -Name $Value | Out-Null
   }
catch{$ee += $_}

    if ($ee.Exception.Message -match "Property $Value does not exist"){return $false}
else {return $true}
}
0

If StrictMode version 2 or greater is not enabled, the -not test should fire if a property doesn't exist:

$prop = (Get-ItemProperty $regkey).$name
if (-not $prop)
{
   New-ItemProperty -Path $regkey -Name $name -Value "X"
}

(If StrictMode version 2 or greater is enabled, the code will fail with an error if the $name does not already exist.)

1
  • 1
    It actually seems that linked solution was indeed correct one, but for some reason I invoked function using C-like syntax instead of passing named parameters and thus both $regkey got initialized with concatenation of strings for $regkey and $name :(
    – Newanja
    Apr 13, 2011 at 12:58
-1

This works for me:

Function Test-RegistryValue 
{
    param($regkey, $name)
    $exists = Get-ItemProperty "$regkey\$name" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
    Write-Host "Test-RegistryValue: $exists"
    if (($exists -eq $null) -or ($exists.Length -eq 0))
    {
        return $false
    }
    else
    {
        return $true
    }
}
-1

I took the Methodology from Carbon above, and streamlined the code into a smaller function, this works very well for me.

    Function Test-RegistryValue($key,$name)
    {
         if(Get-Member -InputObject (Get-ItemProperty -Path $key) -Name $name) 
         {
              return $true
         }
         return $false
    }

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