61

The new SwiftUI framework does not seem to provide a built-in search bar component. Should I use a UISearchController and wrap it in some way, or should I use a simple textfield and update the data according to the textfield input?

EDIT: the current workaround is to use a TextField as a searchBar. It is working very well, but it doesn't have the search icon

enter image description here

import SwiftUI

struct Search : View {
  
  let array = ["John","Lena","Steve","Chris","Catalina"]
  
  @State private var searchText = ""
  
  var body: some View {
      NavigationView{
        List{
            TextField("Type your search",text: $searchText)
                .textFieldStyle(RoundedBorderTextFieldStyle())
            
            ForEach(array.filter{$0.hasPrefix(searchText) || searchText == ""}, id:\.self){searchText in
                Text(searchText)
            }
        }
        .navigationBarTitle(Text("Search"))
      }
  }
}

struct Search_Previews : PreviewProvider {
  static var previews: some View {
    Search()
  }
}

updated to work with Xcode 11.1

3
  • I found this tutorial really helpful: mecid.github.io/2019/06/05/swiftui-making-real-world-app – Teetz Jun 7 '19 at 8:59
  • so he is using a textfield instead of a searchBar – Antoine Weber Jun 7 '19 at 9:22
  • 1
    For people currently trying to replicate this, TextFieldStyle is now a protocol so .textFieldStyle(.roundedBorder) now is .textFieldStyle(RoundedBorderTextFieldStyle()) – Kevin Sep 23 '19 at 15:42
124

Here is a pure swiftUI version, based on Antoine Weber's answer to his question above and what I found in this blog and this gist. It incorporates

  • a clear button,
  • a cancel button,
  • resigning keyboard on dragging in the list and
  • hiding the navigation view when the search text field is selected.

Resigning the keyboard on drag in the list can be realized using a method on UIApplication window following these answers. For easier handling I created an extension on UIApplication and view modifier for this extension and finally an extension to View:

extension UIApplication {
    func endEditing(_ force: Bool) {
        self.windows
            .filter{$0.isKeyWindow}
            .first?
            .endEditing(force)
    }
}

struct ResignKeyboardOnDragGesture: ViewModifier {
    var gesture = DragGesture().onChanged{_ in
        UIApplication.shared.endEditing(true)
    }
    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        content.gesture(gesture)
    }
}

extension View {
    func resignKeyboardOnDragGesture() -> some View {
        return modifier(ResignKeyboardOnDragGesture())
    }
}

So the final modifier for resigning the keyboard is just one modifier that has to be placed on the list like this:

List {
    ForEach(...) {
        //...
    }
}
.resignKeyboardOnDragGesture()

The complete swiftUI project code for the search bar with a sample list of names is as follows. You can paste it into ContentView.swift of a new swiftUI project and play with it.


import SwiftUI

struct ContentView: View {
    let array = ["Peter", "Paul", "Mary", "Anna-Lena", "George", "John", "Greg", "Thomas", "Robert", "Bernie", "Mike", "Benno", "Hugo", "Miles", "Michael", "Mikel", "Tim", "Tom", "Lottie", "Lorrie", "Barbara"]
    @State private var searchText = ""
    @State private var showCancelButton: Bool = false

    var body: some View {

        NavigationView {
            VStack {
                // Search view
                HStack {
                    HStack {
                        Image(systemName: "magnifyingglass")

                        TextField("search", text: $searchText, onEditingChanged: { isEditing in
                            self.showCancelButton = true
                        }, onCommit: {
                            print("onCommit")
                        }).foregroundColor(.primary)

                        Button(action: {
                            self.searchText = ""
                        }) {
                            Image(systemName: "xmark.circle.fill").opacity(searchText == "" ? 0 : 1)
                        }
                    }
                    .padding(EdgeInsets(top: 8, leading: 6, bottom: 8, trailing: 6))
                    .foregroundColor(.secondary)
                    .background(Color(.secondarySystemBackground))
                    .cornerRadius(10.0)

                    if showCancelButton  {
                        Button("Cancel") {
                                UIApplication.shared.endEditing(true) // this must be placed before the other commands here
                                self.searchText = ""
                                self.showCancelButton = false
                        }
                        .foregroundColor(Color(.systemBlue))
                    }
                }
                .padding(.horizontal)
                .navigationBarHidden(showCancelButton) // .animation(.default) // animation does not work properly

                List {
                    // Filtered list of names
                    ForEach(array.filter{$0.hasPrefix(searchText) || searchText == ""}, id:\.self) {
                        searchText in Text(searchText)
                    }
                }
                .navigationBarTitle(Text("Search"))
                .resignKeyboardOnDragGesture()
            }
        }
    }
}



struct ContentView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        Group {
           ContentView()
              .environment(\.colorScheme, .light)

           ContentView()
              .environment(\.colorScheme, .dark)
        }
    }
}

extension UIApplication {
    func endEditing(_ force: Bool) {
        self.windows
            .filter{$0.isKeyWindow}
            .first?
            .endEditing(force)
    }
}

struct ResignKeyboardOnDragGesture: ViewModifier {
    var gesture = DragGesture().onChanged{_ in
        UIApplication.shared.endEditing(true)
    }
    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        content.gesture(gesture)
    }
}

extension View {
    func resignKeyboardOnDragGesture() -> some View {
        return modifier(ResignKeyboardOnDragGesture())
    }
}

The final result for the search bar, when initially displayed looks like this

enter image description here

and when the search bar is edited like this:

enter image description here

In Action:

enter image description here

12
  • 1
    Thanks for the great answer! It works really well except just one minor issue. Putting the List inside a VStack will cause the Navigation bar keeping its height even when the list has been scrolled down. Any workaround on that please? – Anthony Dec 18 '19 at 3:28
  • Not sure, what exactly you are referring to. That's the anticipated behavior. If you look at the search in settings for instance: the search bar stays on the very top until the search is cancelled, just like in the video above. But maybe I misunderstood your question. If you delete the .navigationBarHidden(showCancelButton), the Navigation bar stays as it is and the search bar below it. But that reduces the space for the list. – user3687284 Dec 18 '19 at 19:38
  • I mean when scrolling the list in non-search mode, the nav bar will not collapse. That's because the List is put inside a VStack but not directly within the NavigationView. Just want to know is there any other way to restore the nav bar auto collapse behaviour. – Anthony Jan 25 '20 at 8:53
  • I have not found a good way to collapse the nav bar otherwise. A workaround could be to remove the VStack and put the search bar as first element of the list (before the ForEach), then it will move underneath the nav bar when scrolling. That gives you a bit more space for the list, with the drawback that the search bar is not always visible. – user3687284 Jan 25 '20 at 14:27
  • 2
    brilliant answer, except for minor issues: (1) collapse nav bar when scrolling. (2) the animation of showing/hiding the nav bar is not suitable as written in the comment inside the code – JAHelia Feb 18 '20 at 15:30
19

This YouTube video shows how it can be done. It boils down to:

struct SearchBar: UIViewRepresentable {

    @Binding var text: String

    class Coordinator: NSObject, UISearchBarDelegate {

        @Binding var text: String

        init(text: Binding<String>) {
            _text = text
        }

        func searchBar(_ searchBar: UISearchBar, textDidChange searchText: String) {
            text = searchText
        }
    }
    func makeCoordinator() -> SearchBar.Coordinator {
        return Coordinator(text: $text)
    }

    func makeUIView(context: UIViewRepresentableContext<SearchBar>) -> UISearchBar {
        let searchBar = UISearchBar(frame: .zero)
        searchBar.delegate = context.coordinator
        searchBar.autocapitalizationType = .none
        return searchBar
    }

    func updateUIView(_ uiView: UISearchBar, context: UIViewRepresentableContext<SearchBar>) {
        uiView.text = text
    }
}

and then instead of

TextField($searchText)
              .textFieldStyle(.roundedBorder)

you use

SearchBar(text: $searchText)
2
  • 1
    Is this still working with the latest beta ? For me, text from the coordinator get updated but not further up (SearchBar text and View searchTerm) – Leguman Sep 6 '19 at 12:29
  • It works for me. Can you share some code fragment that shows your problem? – Fred Appelman Sep 6 '19 at 17:34
15

A native Search Bar can be properly implemented in SwiftUI by wrapping the UINavigationController.

This approach gives us the advantage of achieving all the expected behaviours including automatic hide/show on scroll, clear and cancel button, and search key in the keyboard among others.

Wrapping the UINavigationController for Search Bar also ensures that any new changes made to them by Apple are automatically adopted in your project.

Example Output

Click here to see the implementation in action

Code (wrap UINavigationController):

import SwiftUI

struct SearchNavigation<Content: View>: UIViewControllerRepresentable {
    @Binding var text: String
    var search: () -> Void
    var cancel: () -> Void
    var content: () -> Content

    func makeUIViewController(context: Context) -> UINavigationController {
        let navigationController = UINavigationController(rootViewController: context.coordinator.rootViewController)
        navigationController.navigationBar.prefersLargeTitles = true
        
        context.coordinator.searchController.searchBar.delegate = context.coordinator
        
        return navigationController
    }
    
    func updateUIViewController(_ uiViewController: UINavigationController, context: Context) {
        context.coordinator.update(content: content())
    }
    
    func makeCoordinator() -> Coordinator {
        Coordinator(content: content(), searchText: $text, searchAction: search, cancelAction: cancel)
    }
    
    class Coordinator: NSObject, UISearchBarDelegate {
        @Binding var text: String
        let rootViewController: UIHostingController<Content>
        let searchController = UISearchController(searchResultsController: nil)
        var search: () -> Void
        var cancel: () -> Void
        
        init(content: Content, searchText: Binding<String>, searchAction: @escaping () -> Void, cancelAction: @escaping () -> Void) {
            rootViewController = UIHostingController(rootView: content)
            searchController.searchBar.autocapitalizationType = .none
            searchController.obscuresBackgroundDuringPresentation = false
            rootViewController.navigationItem.searchController = searchController
            
            _text = searchText
            search = searchAction
            cancel = cancelAction
        }
        
        func update(content: Content) {
            rootViewController.rootView = content
            rootViewController.view.setNeedsDisplay()
        }
        
        func searchBar(_ searchBar: UISearchBar, textDidChange searchText: String) {
            text = searchText
        }
        
        func searchBarSearchButtonClicked(_ searchBar: UISearchBar) {
            search()
        }
        
        func searchBarCancelButtonClicked(_ searchBar: UISearchBar) {
            cancel()
        }
    }
    
}

The above code can be used as-is (and can of-course be modified to suit the specific needs of the project).

The view includes actions for 'search' and 'cancel' which are respectively called when the search key is tapped on the keyboard and the cancel button of the search bar is pressed. The view also includes a SwiftUI view as a trailing closure and hence can directly replace the NavigationView.

Usage (in SwiftUI View):

import SwiftUI

struct YourView: View {
    // Search string to use in the search bar
    @State var searchString = ""
    
    // Search action. Called when search key pressed on keyboard
    func search() {
    }
    
    // Cancel action. Called when cancel button of search bar pressed
    func cancel() {
    }
    
    // View body
    var body: some View {
        // Search Navigation. Can be used like a normal SwiftUI NavigationView.
        SearchNavigation(text: $searchString, search: search, cancel: cancel) {
            // Example SwiftUI View
            List(dataArray) { data in
                Text(data.text)
            }
            .navigationBarTitle("Usage Example")
        }
        .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.top)
    }
}

I have also written an article on this, it may be referred to get additional clarification.

I hope this helps, cheers!

6
  • Hey Yugantar, just tried this and it works way better than everything I've seen before... as long as you don't use a splitView. To get that to work I had to embed your SearchNavigation as first element in a NavigationView, which did compile but looked absolutely awful. A small improvement was to add .navigatoinBarHidden(true) on the outer NavigationView, but the optics are still, unfortunately, unacceptable. I guess one would need to wrap an entire UISplitViewController to solve that. – ShadowLightz Aug 7 '20 at 11:39
  • @ShadowLightz oh that's excellent to hear! What exact problem is there in SplitView? Our project was iOS focused so I'm not aware of that... – Yugantar Jain Aug 8 '20 at 12:50
  • @YugantarJain just tried this out. It seems that the splitView just doesn't work as a split view, but acts just as a regular navigation view i.e. the second screen pushes onto the previous one. There is also some weird styling around the status bar, almost as if the background is a sightly different colour. – Chris Edwards Aug 14 '20 at 14:27
  • @ChrisEdwards Yes exactly, you just get a blown-up iPhone app on the iPad. Alternatively, when embedding an additional NavigationView inside the SearchNavigation you get a splitview, but also a searchbar spanning across both columns. Embedding the other way around will result in an additional navigation title area. I tried wrapping UISplitViewController, but I'm pretty unhappy with that result, too. Can share the code though. – ShadowLightz Aug 16 '20 at 10:17
  • @ChrisEdwards I'm not sure about the split view, but the status bar having a different color can be fixed by using .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.top) on search navigation view. I've updated the code (under usage) with the same. – Yugantar Jain Aug 16 '20 at 18:29
4

iOS 15.0+

macOS 12.0+, Mac Catalyst 15.0+, tvOS 15.0+, watchOS 8.0+

searchable(_:text:placement:)

Marks this view as searchable, which configures the display of a search field. https://developer.apple.com/

struct DestinationPageView: View {
    @State private var text = ""
    var body: some View {
      NavigationView {
        PrimaryView()
        SecondaryView()
        Text("Select a primary and secondary item")
     }
     .searchable(text: $text)
  }
}

Watch this WWDC video for more info

Craft search experiences in SwiftUI

2

Many UIKit components currently do not have SwiftUI equivalents. In order to use them, you can create a wrapper as in https://developer.apple.com/tutorials/swiftui/creating-and-combining-views.

Basically, you make a SwiftUI class that conforms to UIViewRepresentable and implements makeUIView and updateUIView.

0

This is for iOS 15.0+ in SwiftUI.

struct SearchableList: View {
    
    let groceries = ["Apple", "Banana", "Grapes"]
    @State private var searchText: String = ""
    
    var body: some View {
        NavigationView {
            List(searchResult, id: \.self) { grocerie in
                Button("\(grocerie)") { print("Tapped") }
            }
            .searchable(text: $searchText)
        }
    }
    
    var searchResult: [String] {
        guard !searchText.isEmpty else { return groceries }
        return groceries.filter { $0.contains(searchText) }
    }
}

struct SearchableList_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        SearchableList().previewLayout(.sizeThatFits)
    }
}

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