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I have this homework problem where I have to implement an interpreter for a made up programming language called GritVM.I have built the program and it works using the STL List and Vector as per required by the first question, but on part 2, an optional question asked me to implement my own vector template class and implement it on top of this GritVM.hpp & GritVM.cpp (orignal STL based implementation) without changing the function parameters or the data members I started with.

So far, I have made a custom vector class called ArrayVector. And have made all of the basic ADT vector using the array data structure. I am stuck on two places. My conversion from and to STL doesn't work. I was wondering if someone can help me out. I can provide more code, if you require more info. Thanks in advance.

Errors I am getting are:

GritVM.cpp: In member function 'virtual STATUS GritVM::load(std::__cxx11::string, const std::vector<long int>&)':
GritVM.cpp:56:14: error: binding 'const std::vector<long int>' to reference of type 'std::vector<long int>&' discards qualifiers
  myDataMem = initialMemory;
              ^~~~~~~~~~~~~
In file included from GritVM.hpp:7:0:
ArrayVector.hpp:47:18: note:   initializing argument 1 of 'ArrayVector<Object>& ArrayVector<Object>::operator=(std::vector<Object>&) [with Object = long int]'
     ArrayVector& operator= (std::vector<Object>& stlv){
                  ^~~~~~~~
ArrayVector.hpp: In instantiation of 'std::vector<Object>& ArrayVector<Object>::tempVec_to_stlVec() [with Object = long int]':
GritVM.cpp:17:37:   required from here
ArrayVector.hpp:53:41: error: conversion from 'long int*' to non-scalar type 'std::vector<long int>' requested
         std::vector<Object> to_stdVec = Arr;
                                         ^~~
ArrayVector.hpp:53:29: warning: reference to local variable 'to_stdVec' returned [-Wreturn-local-addr]
         std::vector<Object> to_stdVec = Arr;

ArrayVector.hpp

/********ArrayVector.hpp template class************/

/*Base is given by the book author, it includes enum data
for instructions and machine code. I can give you the code for the base file too*/

#include "GritVMBase.hpp"

template<typename Object>
class ArrayVector{

private:
    int capacity;
    auto num_longElem;
    Object* Arr;
protected:
public:
    friend class GritVM;

    ArrayVector() : capacity(0), num_longElem(0), Arr(nullptr) { }

    ArrayVector(std::vector<Object>& stl_vector_para){ 
       Arr = stl_vector_para;
       capacity = stl_vector_para.capacity();
       num_longElem = stl_vector_para.size();
    };

    ~ArrayVector(){
        delete [] Arr;
    }

    ArrayVector(const ArrayVector& av){ 
        capacity =  av.capacity;
        num_longElem = av.num_longElem;
        Arr = new Object [capacity];
        for(auto x = 0; x < num_longElem; ++x){ 
            Arr[x] = av.Arr[x];
        }
    }

    ArrayVector& operator= (ArrayVector& av){
        ArrayVector copy = av;
        std::swap(*this, copy);
        return *this;
    }

    /***********NOT SURE ABOUT THESE TWO!!!*************/
    ArrayVector& operator= (std::vector<Object>& stlv){
        ArrayVector copy = stlv;
        std::swap(*this, copy);
        return *this;
    }
    std::vector<Object>& tempVec_to_stlVec(ArrayVector& av){
        std::vector<Object> to_stdVec = av;
        return to_stdVec;
    }
    /***************************************************/
     Object& at(auto index){
        if(index < 0 || index > num_longElem){
            throw ("Out of bound access.\n");
        }
        return Arr[index];
    }

    void erase(auto index){
        if(index < 0 || index > num_longElem){
            throw ("erase() failed.\n");
        }
        for(auto x = index + 1; x < num_longElem; ++x){
            Arr[x-1] = Arr[x];
        }
        --num_longElem;
    }

    void insert(auto index, const Object& le){
        if(num_longElem >= capacity){
            reserve(std::max(1 , 2*capacity));
        }
        for(auto x = num_longElem-1; x >= index; --x){
            Arr[x+1] = Arr[x];
        }
        Arr[index] =  le;
        ++num_longElem;
    }
/*...then some more basic ADT like size(), empty(), reserve(), empty() etc...*/
};

GritVM.hpp

#include "ArrayVector.hpp"
#include "GritVMBase.hpp"

class GritVM : public GritVMInterface {
private:
    long accumulator; /*Stores the result*/
    STATUS machineStatus; /*Gets the enum data from Machine Status*/

    std::list<Instruction>::iterator currentInstruct; /*Iterator that runs on enum data*/
    std::list<Instruction> instructMem;/*Adds the instruction*/
    std::vector<long> dataMem; /*Data memory, can't be erased or changed*/

    ArrayVector<long> myDataMem; /*TRYING TO GET THIS IMPLEMENTED ALONG SIDE STL VECTOR dataMem*/

    long evaluate(Instruction current_instruction); /*Does arithmatic based on instruction*/
    void advance(long move_instruction_amount); /*Advances the machine instruction*/
protected:
public:
    GritVM(); /*Default constructor*/
    ~GritVM() { } /* Default destructor*/

    /*Assignment realated overridden functions, were pure virtial functions, the parameters can't be changed*/
    STATUS load(const std::string filename, const std::vector<long>& initialMemory);
    STATUS run();
    std::vector<long> getDataMem();
    STATUS reset();
};

GritVM.cpp

#include "GritVM.hpp"

GritVM::GritVM() : accumulator(0), machineStatus(WAITING) { }/*Default constructor*/

/*Resets the machine state to default*/
STATUS GritVM::reset() { 
    accumulator = 0;
    machineStatus = WAITING;
    //dataMem.clear();
    myDataMem.clear(); /**>>>>>HERE<<<<<**/
    instructMem.clear();
    return machineStatus;
}

/*Returns the current data in the Data Memory*/ /**>>>>>HERE<<<<<**/
std::vector<long> GritVM::getDataMem() {
    //return dataMem;
    return myDataMem.tempVec_to_stlVec(myDataMem);
}

STATUS GritVM::load(const std::string filename, const std::vector<long>& initialMemory) {

    /**Taken away some reading from gvm file to save room***/

    /*Copy the memory to data vector*/
    //dataMem = initialMemory;
    myDataMem= initialMemory; /**>>>>>HERE<<<<<**/

    return machineStatus;
}

/*Run instruction for the Grit machine*/
STATUS GritVM::run() {

    /***Taken away to save room, is not related to dataMem vector***/
    return machineStatus;
}

/*All these evaluate came from the table in the book */
long GritVM::evaluate(Instruction current_instruction) {

    long move_instruction_amount = 0; /*Instruction move counter*/

    /*******SOME OF THE dataMem are here*******/

    switch (current_instruction.operation) {
    case AT: 
        machineStatus = RUNNING;
        move_instruction_amount = 1;
        //accumulator = dataMem.at(current_instruction.argument);
        accumulator = myDataMem.at(current_instruction.argument);
        break; /**>>>>>HERE<<<<<**/
    case SET:
        machineStatus = RUNNING;
        move_instruction_amount = 1;
        //dataMem.at(current_instruction.argument) = accumulator;
        myDataMem.at(current_instruction.argument) = accumulator;
        break; /**>>>>>HERE<<<<<**/
    case INSERT:
        machineStatus = RUNNING;
        move_instruction_amount = 1;
        //dataMem.insert(current_instruction.argument, accumulator);
        myDataMem.insert(current_instruction.argument, accumulator);
        break; /**>>>>>HERE<<<<<**/

         /***a lot of cases are taken out***/
    default:
        machineStatus = ERRORED; 
        break;
    }

    return move_instruction_amount;
}

/*Takes the instruction, and advancces its amount, given from the pdf file*/
void  GritVM::advance(long move_instruction_amount) {

    /***taken away to save room, doesn't use dataMem vector****/
}
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    @ChoraMora that's okay. stackoverflow is pretty strict in its rule, but it's the only way to have searchable, high quality question and answers – Guillaume Racicot Jun 7 '19 at 14:05
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    @ChoraMora much better! Thank you for updating the answer quickly. – Guillaume Racicot Jun 7 '19 at 14:10
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    Arr = stl_vector_para; This can't work. Arr is of type Object*, while stl_vector_para is a referenece to const std::vector<Object>. Arr may therefore only point to an object of type Object, which does not hold for a vector. – Daniel Langr Jun 7 '19 at 14:16
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    BTW, why are you implementing your own vector? It's quite complicated to implement a data structure like this one and your C++ skills seem to be relatively elementary for that (no offense). What is wrong with std::vector. If you need some additional functionality, consider designing an own class with vector as a member variable. – Daniel Langr Jun 7 '19 at 14:19
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    @ChoraMora I see. Note that implementing a vector is really not an easy task. But you can learn a lot by trying to accomplish it :). – Daniel Langr Jun 7 '19 at 14:24
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First off I would recommend not implementing your own vector. There is a lot of pitfalls and it's complicated to do it right.


There are many problems that prevents the conversion to happen.

First, your operator= takes a mutable reference to a vector:

//    not const  -------v
ArrayVector& operator= (std::vector<Object>& stlv){
    ArrayVector copy = stlv;
    std::swap(*this, copy);
    return *this;
}

//          v------- not const either
ArrayVector(std::vector<Object>& stl_vector_para){ 
   Arr = stl_vector_para;
   capacity = stl_vector_para.capacity();
   num_longElem = stl_vector_para.size();
}

Mutable reference are taken, but you don't need to actually mutate the vector. Making them const will fix the first problem, since you are trying to pass a const vector to it:

//     a reference to a const vector ---v
STATUS load(const std::string filename, const std::vector<long>& initialMemory) {
    myDataMem = initialMemory;
    //          ^----- cannot pass a const vector to a
    //                 function that takes a mutable one

    return machineStatus;
}

Then, you have a lifetime issue:

// returns by reference
std::vector<Object>& tempVec_to_stlVec(ArrayVector& av) {
    // to_stdVec lives until the end of the function
    std::vector<Object> to_stdVec = av;
    return to_stdVec; // return a reference to an object that will die
}

Local variable don't live past their scopes. You are returning a reference to a dead vector. Simply return by value instead:

// by value
std::vector<Object> tempVec_to_stlVec(ArrayVector& av) {
    // to_stdVec lives until the end of the function
    std::vector<Object> to_stdVec = av;
    return to_stdVec; // return the object by value
}

Return value optimisation will take care of making the return by value efficient. If that optimisation cannot be done, move constructor will take care of it.


Then I saw errors that wasn't in the posted errors.

Vectors are not convertible into pointers:

Arr = stl_vector_para;

It doesn't work that way. If you really want to make your own vector class, you must do dynamic allocations and copy data into, manually.

C++ offers these data structure for a reason: to make our life easier, and make C++ enjoyable. Implementing your own vector is usually pain unless you know what you are doing.

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    @ChoraMora Everyone tries to implement data structure in their begining. However, the need to implement them is rare, and usually you can save yourself by implementing those complex containers by piggybacking on more basic ones like vector. – Guillaume Racicot Jun 7 '19 at 14:53
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    @ChoraMora also be careful, you got memory leaks inside your constructors. I would suggest to take the time looking for std::unique_ptr to avoid leaking – Guillaume Racicot Jun 7 '19 at 14:54
  • Coincidentally when you told me about mutable reference, I stumbled upon unique_ptr. Regarding the memory leak, definitely, will look at the destructor and freeing memory heap again. Just quick question, you as a programmer, how often you apply your defined containers from scratch? I have seen people built on to the STL containers. Because some of the operators are not defined within those headers. – WannabeSmith Jun 7 '19 at 15:07
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    @ChoraMora rarely. I find most containers in the STL fits my needs. When I have special needs there is boost container, frozen containers I can look into, polyfills from C++17 and C++20, and then when I have domain specific containers like quadtrees, octrees or sparse data structure then I usually use normal containers to implement them. – Guillaume Racicot Jun 7 '19 at 15:11
  • hmm...interesting. I know of Binary Trees, and boost containers. Have to look at these ones you mentioned. I have used boost library before to make a graphic in c++. Thanks for sharing new stuff with me. Just ~9000 hours away from my 10000 hrs goal of becoming even remotely informed in c++, then I will be back up strong. HEHEH!! – WannabeSmith Jun 7 '19 at 15:17

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