1

I'am familiar with the conditional compilation with macros in "C" language but some piece of code makes me confused ,I can understand how CODE-1 works, nothing is assigned into X therefore Y is defined as 5 (else condition) and on print Y we will get 5 as a output.

but in the CODE-2 which is quite similar to the CODE-1 except the "#if X == A" condition which gives the output as 3,which i don't understand how it can produce output as 3 .Can anyone tells me how

 "#if X == 3"

and

"#if X == A"`

makes the difference in the output.


CODE-1

#include <stdio.h>
#if X == 3
#define Y 3
#else
#define Y 5
#endif

int main()
{
  printf("%d", Y);
  return 0;
}

//output : 5

CODE-2

#include <stdio.h>
#if X == A
#define Y 3
#else
#define Y 5
#endif

int main()
{
  printf("%d", Y);
  return 0;
}

//output : 3

I expect the output of CODE-2 to be 5, but the actual output is 3.

3

Tokens in macro conditionals that aren't further expandable to integers (aren't macros) get replaced by 0.

6.10.1p4:

Prior to evaluation, macro invocations in the list of preprocessing tokens that will become the controlling constant expression are replaced (except for those macro names modified by the defined unary operator), just as in normal text. If the token defined is generated as a result of this replacement process or use of the defined unary operator does not match one of the two specified forms prior to macro replacement, the behavior is undefined. After all replacements due to macro expansion and the defined unary operator have been performed, all remaining identifiers (including those lexically identical to keywords) are replaced with the pp-number 0, and then each preprocessing token is converted into a token. The resulting tokens compose the controlling constant expression which is evaluated according to the rules of 6.6.

Since neither X nor why Y is defined in your second snippet, it becomes equivalent to:

#if 0 == 0
#define Y 3
#else
#define Y 5
#endif

which naturally resolves to the first branch.

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