56

I'm trying to recreate a portion of the Twitter iOS app to learn SwiftUI and am wondering how to dynamically change the width of one view to be the width of another view. In my case, to have the underline be the same width as the Text view.

I have attached a screenshot to try and better explain what I'm referring to. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks!

Also here is the code I have so far:

import SwiftUI

struct GridViewHeader : View {

    @State var leftPadding: Length = 0.0
    @State var underLineWidth: Length = 100

    var body: some View {
        return VStack {
            HStack {
                Text("Tweets")
                    .tapAction {
                        self.leftPadding = 0

                }
                Spacer()
                Text("Tweets & Replies")
                    .tapAction {
                        self.leftPadding = 100
                    }
                Spacer()
                Text("Media")
                    .tapAction {
                        self.leftPadding = 200
                }
                Spacer()
                Text("Likes")
            }
            .frame(height: 50)
            .padding(.horizontal, 10)
            HStack {
                Rectangle()
                    .frame(width: self.underLineWidth, height: 2, alignment: .bottom)
                    .padding(.leading, leftPadding)
                    .animation(.basic())
                Spacer()
            }
        }
    }
}

3
  • 4
    That's an important question. And i don't know generally how to get size of everything in SwiftUI or for example x and y of ScrollView. :( Jun 8, 2019 at 10:01
  • 1
    I think you are missing an important piece of what SwiftUI (and declarative programming as a whole) is about. Could be wrong though. Have you considered making each Text and Rectangle it's own "custom view" - both in code and in layout - and incorporating the underscore as part of that? (1) Design your View to have a single Text with an underscore - even if it takes a ZStack and a Rectangle. Trust that it will not have padding. (2) Now place this view into a rectangle with padding if you need it. This is a single view. Don't worry about size, worry about hierarchy.
    – user7014451
    Jun 8, 2019 at 10:41
  • 2
    @Sajad_Behesti, If you need to size something just do it. BUT - if you don't, let SwiftUI do it for the device it's on. As for scroll views, use a List. For both of you, I'd recommend watching two (or more) WWDC sessions - introducing SwiftUI ( developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2019/204 ) and SwiftUI Essentials ( developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2019/216 ). It's a different mindset than UIKit but worth the time.
    – user7014451
    Jun 8, 2019 at 10:46

7 Answers 7

61

I have written a detailed explanation about using GeometryReader, view preferences and anchor preferences. The code below uses those concepts. For further information on how they work, check this article I posted: https://swiftui-lab.com/communicating-with-the-view-tree-part-1/

The solution below, will properly animate the underline:

enter image description here

I struggled to make this work and I agree with you. Sometimes, you just need to be able to pass up or down the hierarchy, some framing information. In fact, the WWDC2019 session 237 (Building Custom Views with SwiftUI), explains that views communicate their sizing continuously. It basically says Parent proposes size to child, childen decide how they want to layout theirselves and communicate back to the parent. How they do that? I suspect the anchorPreference has something to do with it. However it is very obscure and not at all documented yet. The API is exposed, but grasping how those long function prototypes work... that's a hell I do not have time for right now.

I think Apple has left this undocumented to force us rethink the whole framework and forget about "old" UIKit habits and start thinking declaratively. However, there are still times when this is needed. Have you ever wonder how the background modifier works? I would love to see that implementation. It would explain a lot! I'm hoping Apple will document preferences in the near future. I have been experimenting with custom PreferenceKey and it looks interesting.

Now back to your specific need, I managed to work it out. There are two dimensions you need (the x position and width of the text). One I get it fair and square, the other seems a bit of a hack. Nevertheless, it works perfectly.

The x position of the text I solved it by creating a custom horizontal alignment. More information on that check session 237 (at minute 19:00). Although I recommend you watch the whole thing, it sheds a lot of light on how the layout process works.

The width, however, I'm not so proud of... ;-) It requires DispatchQueue to avoid updating the view while being displayed. UPDATE: I fixed it in the second implementation down below

First implementation

extension HorizontalAlignment {
    private enum UnderlineLeading: AlignmentID {
        static func defaultValue(in d: ViewDimensions) -> CGFloat {
            return d[.leading]
        }
    }

    static let underlineLeading = HorizontalAlignment(UnderlineLeading.self)
}


struct GridViewHeader : View {

    @State private var activeIdx: Int = 0
    @State private var w: [CGFloat] = [0, 0, 0, 0]

    var body: some View {
        return VStack(alignment: .underlineLeading) {
            HStack {
                Text("Tweets").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 0))
                Spacer()
                Text("Tweets & Replies").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 1))
                Spacer()
                Text("Media").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 2))
                Spacer()
                Text("Likes").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 3))
                }
                .frame(height: 50)
                .padding(.horizontal, 10)
            Rectangle()
                .alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in d[.leading]  }
                .frame(width: w[activeIdx],  height: 2)
                .animation(.linear)
        }
    }
}

struct MagicStuff: ViewModifier {
    @Binding var activeIdx: Int
    @Binding var widths: [CGFloat]
    let idx: Int

    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        Group {
            if activeIdx == idx {
                content.alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in
                    DispatchQueue.main.async { self.widths[self.idx] = d.width }

                    return d[.leading]
                }.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }

            } else {
                content.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }
            }
        }
    }
}

Update: Better implementation without using DispatchQueue

My first solution works, but I was not too proud of the way the width is passed to the underline view.

I found a better way of achieving the same thing. It turns out, the background modifier is very powerful. It is much more than a modifier that can let you decorate the background of a view.

The basic steps are:

  1. Use Text("text").background(TextGeometry()). TextGeometry is a custom view that has a parent with the same size as the text view. That is what .background() does. Very powerful.
  2. In my implementation of TextGeometry I use GeometryReader, to get the geometry of the parent, which means, I get the geometry of the Text view, which means I now have the width.
  3. Now to pass the width back, I am using Preferences. There's zero documentation about them, but after a little experimentation, I think preferences are something like "view attributes" if you like. I created my custom PreferenceKey, called WidthPreferenceKey and I use it in TextGeometry to "attach" the width to the view, so it can be read higher in the hierarchy.
  4. Back in the ancestor, I use onPreferenceChange to detect changes in the width, and set the widths array accordingly.

It may all sound too complex, but the code illustrates it best. Here's the new implementation:

import SwiftUI

extension HorizontalAlignment {
    private enum UnderlineLeading: AlignmentID {
        static func defaultValue(in d: ViewDimensions) -> CGFloat {
            return d[.leading]
        }
    }

    static let underlineLeading = HorizontalAlignment(UnderlineLeading.self)
}

struct WidthPreferenceKey: PreferenceKey {
    static var defaultValue = CGFloat(0)

    static func reduce(value: inout CGFloat, nextValue: () -> CGFloat) {
        value = nextValue()
    }

    typealias Value = CGFloat
}


struct GridViewHeader : View {

    @State private var activeIdx: Int = 0
    @State private var w: [CGFloat] = [0, 0, 0, 0]

    var body: some View {
        return VStack(alignment: .underlineLeading) {
            HStack {
                Text("Tweets")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 0))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[0] = $0 })

                Spacer()

                Text("Tweets & Replies")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 1))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[1] = $0 })

                Spacer()

                Text("Media")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 2))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[2] = $0 })

                Spacer()

                Text("Likes")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 3))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[3] = $0 })

                }
                .frame(height: 50)
                .padding(.horizontal, 10)
            Rectangle()
                .alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in d[.leading]  }
                .frame(width: w[activeIdx],  height: 2)
                .animation(.linear)
        }
    }
}

struct TextGeometry: View {
    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            return Rectangle().fill(Color.clear).preference(key: WidthPreferenceKey.self, value: geometry.size.width)
        }
    }
}

struct MagicStuff: ViewModifier {
    @Binding var activeIdx: Int
    let idx: Int

    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        Group {
            if activeIdx == idx {
                content.alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in
                    return d[.leading]
                }.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }

            } else {
                content.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }
            }
        }
    }
}
12
  • great solution. I am still struggling to understand how alignmentGuide works. Like in WWDC2019 session 237, I haven't got what is going on under the hood at 22:50. When we say viewDimension[.bottom] is a Length (CGFloat), what does that length represent, view's height? Jun 24, 2019 at 10:28
  • It is rather confusing. It seems that .bottom is indirectly the height. If .top == 0 then .bottom would be reflecting the height. I don't know... With so little documentation, it will require some trial an error in different scenarios, in order to get to a confident conclusion.
    – kontiki
    Jun 24, 2019 at 10:37
  • It's a very clever trick, I will try to apply it. But I wonder if it might be possible to use two custom alignments, one on the left and one on the right end, to get the width?
    – Gusutafu
    Jun 30, 2019 at 6:26
  • 1
    @Gusutafu I already tried, but failed miserably to use the double custom alignment approach. Let me know if you are successful. By the way, since then I figured out how to use anchor preferences, which I think is the way to go. I am writing an article and will post a link here for further reference once it's finished.
    – kontiki
    Jun 30, 2019 at 6:30
  • 1
    Hi @bain Updated code to latest API. Replaced Length with CGFloat. .basic animation with .linear, and .onTapAction with .tagGesture.
    – kontiki
    Jan 12, 2020 at 10:08
34

First, to answer the question in the title, if you want to make a shape (view) fit to the size of another view, you can use an .overlay(). The .overlay() gets offered its size from the view it is modifying.

In order to set offsets and widths in your Twitter recreation, you can use a GeometryReader. The GeometryReader has the ability to find its .frame(in:) another coordinate space.

You can use .coordinateSpace(name:) to identify the reference coordinate space.

struct ContentView: View {
    @State private var offset: CGFloat = 0
    @State private var width: CGFloat = 0
    var body: some View {
        HStack {
            Text("Tweets")
                .overlay(MoveUnderlineButton(offset: $offset, width: $width))
            Text("Tweets & Replies")
                .overlay(MoveUnderlineButton(offset: $offset, width: $width))
            Text("Media")
                .overlay(MoveUnderlineButton(offset: $offset, width: $width))
            Text("Likes")
                .overlay(MoveUnderlineButton(offset: $offset, width: $width))
        }
        .coordinateSpace(name: "container")
        .overlay(underline, alignment: .bottomLeading)
        .animation(.spring())
    }
    var underline: some View {
        Rectangle()
            .frame(height: 2)
            .frame(width: width)
            .padding(.leading, offset)
    }
    struct MoveUnderlineButton: View {
        @Binding var offset: CGFloat
        @Binding var width: CGFloat
        var body: some View {
            GeometryReader { geometry in
                Button(action: {
                    self.offset = geometry.frame(in: .named("container")).minX
                    self.width = geometry.size.width
                }) {
                    Rectangle().foregroundColor(.clear)
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
  1. The underline view is is a 2 point high Rectangle, put in an .overlay() on top of the HStack.
  2. The underline view is aligned to .bottomLeading, so that we can programmatically set its .padding(.leading, _) using a @State value.
  3. The underline view's .frame(width:) is also set using a @State value.
  4. The HStack is set as the .coordinateSpace(name: "container") so we can find the frame of our buttons relative to this.
  5. The MoveUnderlineButton uses a GeometryReader to find its own width and minX in order to set the respective values for the underline view
  6. The MoveUnderlineButton is set as the .overlay() for the Text view containing the text of that button so that its GeometryReader inherits its size from that Text view.

Segmented with Underbar in action

1
  • 3
    To enable default selection MoveUnderlineButton should have isActive property and .onAppear { if self.isActive { self.width = geometry.size.width } } should be added to button
    – HereTrix
    Jun 12, 2020 at 11:37
3

Give this a try:

import SwiftUI

var titles = ["Tweets", "Tweets & Replies", "Media", "Likes"]

struct GridViewHeader : View {

    @State var selectedItem: String = "Tweets"

    var body: some View {
        HStack(spacing: 20) {
            ForEach(titles.identified(by: \.self)) { title in
                HeaderTabButton(title: title, selectedItem: self.$selectedItem)
                }
                .frame(height: 50)
        }.padding(.horizontal, 10)

    }
}

struct HeaderTabButton : View {
    var title: String

    @Binding var selectedItem: String

    var isSelected: Bool {
        selectedItem == title
    }

    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            Button(action: { self.selectedItem = self.title }) {
                Text(title).fixedSize(horizontal: true, vertical: false)

                Rectangle()
                    .frame(height: 2, alignment: .bottom)
                    .relativeWidth(1)
                    .foregroundColor(isSelected ? Color.accentColor : Color.clear)

            }
        }
    }
}

And here's what it looks like in preview: Preview screen

3
  • 7
    Your solution does not animate. This is because the way you layout, is by creating the underline as 4 different views. The OP was hoping for a single underline that would slide and resize into position. I also posted my answer, which uses a single view for the underline, which moves and resizes accordingly.
    – kontiki
    Jun 19, 2019 at 7:01
  • 2
    Hmm, they didn't call that out in their question, but I also don't use Twitter, so maybe it's obvious if you do!
    – piebie
    Jun 19, 2019 at 12:06
  • I'm not a twitter user either, that was just my interpretation. The OP said: "dynamically change the width of one view". He talks about "one" view, not 4. Hence, my assumption. I may be wrong though.
    – kontiki
    Jun 19, 2019 at 12:29
3

Let me modestly suggest a slight modification of this bright answer: Version without using preferences:

import SwiftUI

extension HorizontalAlignment {
    private enum UnderlineLeading: AlignmentID {
        static func defaultValue(in d: ViewDimensions) -> CGFloat {
            return d[.leading]
        }
    }

    static let underlineLeading = HorizontalAlignment(UnderlineLeading.self)
}


struct GridViewHeader : View {

    @State private var activeIdx: Int = 0
    @State private var w: [CGFloat] = [0, 0, 0, 0]

    var body: some View {
        return VStack(alignment: .underlineLeading) {
            HStack {
                Text("Tweets").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 0))
                Spacer()
                Text("Tweets & Replies").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 1))
                Spacer()
                Text("Media").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 2))
                Spacer()
                Text("Likes").modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, widths: $w, idx: 3))
                }
                .frame(height: 50)
                .padding(.horizontal, 10)
            Rectangle()
                .alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in d[.leading]  }
                .frame(width: w[activeIdx],  height: 2)
                .animation(.linear)
        }
    }
}

struct MagicStuff: ViewModifier {
    @Binding var activeIdx: Int
    @Binding var widths: [CGFloat]
    let idx: Int

    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        var w: CGFloat = 0
        return Group {
            if activeIdx == idx {
                content.alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in
                    w = d.width
                    return d[.leading]
                }.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }.onAppear(perform: {self.widths[self.idx] = w})

            } else {
                content.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }
            }
        }
    }
}

Version using preferences and GeometryReader:

import SwiftUI

extension HorizontalAlignment {
    private enum UnderlineLeading: AlignmentID {
        static func defaultValue(in d: ViewDimensions) -> CGFloat {
            return d[.leading]
        }
    }

    static let underlineLeading = HorizontalAlignment(UnderlineLeading.self)
}

struct WidthPreferenceKey: PreferenceKey {
    static var defaultValue = CGFloat(0)

    static func reduce(value: inout CGFloat, nextValue: () -> CGFloat) {
        value = nextValue()
    }

    typealias Value = CGFloat
}


struct GridViewHeader : View {

    @State private var activeIdx: Int = 0
    @State private var w: [CGFloat] = [0, 0, 0, 0]

    var body: some View {
        return VStack(alignment: .underlineLeading) {
            HStack {
                Text("Tweets")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 0, widthStorage: $w))

                Spacer()

                Text("Tweets & Replies")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 1, widthStorage: $w))

                Spacer()

                Text("Media")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 2, widthStorage: $w))

                Spacer()

                Text("Likes")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 3, widthStorage: $w))

                }
                .frame(height: 50)
                .padding(.horizontal, 10)
            Rectangle()
                .frame(width: w[activeIdx],  height: 2)
                .animation(.linear)
        }
    }
}

struct MagicStuff: ViewModifier {
    @Binding var activeIdx: Int
    let idx: Int
    @Binding var widthStorage: [CGFloat]

    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        Group {

            if activeIdx == idx {
                content.background(GeometryReader { geometry in
                    return Color.clear.preference(key: WidthPreferenceKey.self, value: geometry.size.width)
                })
                .alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in
                    return d[.leading]
                }.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.widthStorage[self.idx] = $0 })


            } else {
                content.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }.onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.widthStorage[self.idx] = $0 })
            }
        }
    }
}
0

Here's a super simple solution, although it doesn't account for the tabs being stretched full width - but that should just be minor additional math for calculating the padding.

import SwiftUI

struct HorizontalTabs: View {

  private let tabsSpacing = CGFloat(16)

  private func tabWidth(at index: Int) -> CGFloat {
    let label = UILabel()
    label.text = tabs[index]
    let labelWidth = label.intrinsicContentSize.width
    return labelWidth
  }

  private var leadingPadding: CGFloat {
    var padding: CGFloat = 0
    for i in 0..<tabs.count {
      if i < selectedIndex {
        padding += tabWidth(at: i) + tabsSpacing
      }
    }
    return padding
  }

  let tabs: [String]

  @State var selectedIndex: Int = 0

  var body: some View {
    VStack(alignment: .leading) {
      HStack(spacing: tabsSpacing) {
        ForEach(0..<tabs.count, id: \.self) { index in
          Button(action: { self.selectedIndex = index }) {
            Text(self.tabs[index])
          }
        }
      }
      Rectangle()
        .frame(width: tabWidth(at: selectedIndex), height: 3, alignment: .bottomLeading)
        .foregroundColor(.blue)
        .padding(.leading, leadingPadding)
        .animation(Animation.spring())
    }
  }
}

HorizontalTabs(tabs: ["one", "two", "three"]) renders this:

screenshot

-2

You just need to specify a frame with a height within it. Here's an example :

VStack {
    Text("First Text Label")

    Spacer().frame(height: 50)    // This line

    Text("Second Text Label")
}
-3

This solution is very wonderful.

But it became a compilation error now, it corrected. (Xcode11.1)

This is a whole code.

extension HorizontalAlignment {
    private enum UnderlineLeading: AlignmentID {
        static func defaultValue(in d: ViewDimensions) -> CGFloat {
            return d[.leading]
        }
    }

    static let underlineLeading = HorizontalAlignment(UnderlineLeading.self)
}

struct WidthPreferenceKey: PreferenceKey {
    typealias Value = CGFloat
    static var defaultValue = CGFloat(0)
    static func reduce(value: inout CGFloat, nextValue: () -> CGFloat) {
        value = nextValue()
    }
}


struct HorizontalTabsView : View {

    @State private var activeIdx: Int = 0
    @State private var w: [CGFloat] = [0, 0, 0, 0]

    var body: some View {
        return VStack(alignment: .underlineLeading) {
            HStack {
                Text("Tweets")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 0))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[0] = $0 })

                Spacer()

                Text("Tweets & Replies")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 1))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[1] = $0 })

                Spacer()

                Text("Media")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 2))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[2] = $0 })

                Spacer()

                Text("Likes")
                    .modifier(MagicStuff(activeIdx: $activeIdx, idx: 3))
                    .background(TextGeometry())
                    .onPreferenceChange(WidthPreferenceKey.self, perform: { self.w[3] = $0 })

                }
                .frame(height: 50)
                .padding(.horizontal, 10)

            Rectangle()
                .alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in d[.leading]  }
                .frame(width: w[activeIdx],  height: 2)
                .animation(.default)
        }
    }
}

struct TextGeometry: View {
    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            return Rectangle()
                .foregroundColor(.clear)
                .preference(key: WidthPreferenceKey.self, value: geometry.size.width)
        }
    }
}

struct MagicStuff: ViewModifier {
    @Binding var activeIdx: Int
    let idx: Int

    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        Group {
            if activeIdx == idx {
                content.alignmentGuide(.underlineLeading) { d in
                    return d[.leading]
                }.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }

            } else {
                content.onTapGesture { self.activeIdx = self.idx }
            }
        }
    }
}

struct HorizontalTabsView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        HorizontalTabsView()
    }
}
1
  • 1
    If their code had errors, edit their original answer, not make your own answer.
    – George
    Jan 3, 2020 at 21:36

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