22

Assume I have a View with an Image that has a shadow property:

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        Image("turtlerock").shadow(radius: 10)
    }
}

Now imagine I want to access the value of the shadow radius. I assumed I could do this:

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        let myImage = Image("turtlerock").shadow(radius: 10)
        print(myImage.modifier.radius)
    }
}

However, this returns an error:

Function declares an opaque return type, but has no return statements in its body from which to infer an underlying type

Is there a way to accomplish this somehow?

32

When modifying and building views, you can do this without a return statement and a building block one above the other without commas. This is called a multi-statement closure. When you try to create a variable inside a multi-statement closure, the compiler is going to complain because there is a mismatch in types (you can only combine views one after another, nothing more). See this answer for more details: https://stackoverflow.com/a/56435128/7715250

A way to fix this is to explicitly return the views you are combining, so you don't make use of the multi-closure statements:

struct MyView: View {
    var body: some View {
        let image = Image("Some image").shadow(radius: 10)
        let myRadius = image.modifier.radius

        // Do something with myRadius

        return image // No multi closure statements.
    }
}
2
  • Thank you very much, you've explained it all! I've edited my original question to only address one problem and I'll create a second one that deals with accessing modifier variables. I'd suggest editing this answer to only include the second half and including the information about accessing modifiers in an answer under the other question. – Tamás Sengel Jun 8 '19 at 12:16
  • Here's the other question: stackoverflow.com/q/56506318/3151675 – Tamás Sengel Jun 8 '19 at 12:20
3

If your view you want to reference is inside a stack, you should declare it outside the stack like this:

var body: some View {
    let myImage = Image("image").shadow(radius: 10)

    let stack = HStack {
        myImage
        Image("image2")
    }

    return stack
}
1

You can define the image outside body:

let myImage = Image("turtlerock").shadow(radius: 10)

var body: some View {
  myImage
}

To print the radius you can do like so:

var body: some View {
  myImage
    .tapAction {
      print(self.myImage.modifier.radius) // 10.0
  }
}
2
  • this answer is also correct print(self.myImage.modifier.radius) // 10.0 why downvote ? – Prashant Tukadiya Jun 8 '19 at 12:14
  • @PrashantTukadiya I upvoted this answer, somebody else downvoted it. – Tamás Sengel Jun 8 '19 at 15:51
1

When it happens to me in a testing environment I just nest everything in the body inside a

return ZStack{ ...}

A bit quick and dirty, but it works for my purposes.

1

I'm using Group {}:

func makeContentView() -> some View {
    Group {
        if some_condition_here {
            Text("Hello World")
                .foregroundColor(.red)
                .font(.system(size: 13, weight: .bold, design: .monospaced))
            } else {
                Rectangle()
                    .fill(Color.gray20)
            }
        }
    }
}

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