0
use crate::List::{Cons, Nil};

#[derive(Debug)]
struct Foo {}

#[derive(Debug)]
enum List {
    Cons(i32, Foo),
    Nil,
}

impl List {
    fn tail(&self) -> Option<&Foo> {
        match self {
            Cons(_, item) => Some(item), // why `item` is of type `&Foo`?
            Nil => None,
        }
    }
}

As stated in the comment, why is item of type &Foo? What is the rule that says item will be type &Foo rather than Foo?

I understand that it does not make sense for item to be Foo; &self says self is a reference, so it does not make sense to move a value out of a reference, but are there any specifications that define the rules clearly?

  • @SergioTulentsev thanks for your reply. Actually RefCell is unrelated to what I am trying to ask. Removed RefCell to avoid confusion. – Helin Wang Jun 9 at 1:41
6

RFC 2005 (a.k.a. match ergonomics) introduced the rule.

Before the change was implemented, there were 2 ways to write this match.

  1. Match on self and prefix each pattern with & to "destructure" the reference.

    fn tail(&self) -> Option<&Foo> {
        match self {
            &Cons(_, ref item) => Some(item),
            &Nil => None,
        }
    }
    
  2. Match on *self and don't prefix each pattern with & (because *self is not a reference).

    fn tail(&self) -> Option<&Foo> {
        match *self {
            Cons(_, ref item) => Some(item),
            Nil => None,
        }
    }
    

Yet, in both cases, we need to write ref item, otherwise we'll get error[E0507]: cannot move out of borrowed content.

However, in the match you've written, the expression being matched is a reference (type &List) but the patterns are not reference patterns (as in 1. above). This is where match ergonomics kick in: the rule says that when a reference is matched with a non-reference pattern, the bindings within that pattern bind by reference rather than by value (i.e. as if they were prefixed with ref).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.