63

I couldn't find any reference about any ways to make a pop or a dismiss programmatically of my presented view with SwiftUI.

Seems to me that the only way is to use the already integrated slide dow action for the modal(and what/how if I want to disable this feature?), and the back button for the navigation stack.

Does anyone know a solution? Do you know if this is a bug or it will stays like this?

  • Given the current API status, you will have to implement those transitions yourself. – Matteo Pacini Jun 9 '19 at 10:05
  • You can now do this in Beta 5 for both Navigation and Modals. See my answer below. – Chuck H Jul 30 '19 at 20:32
  • Take a look at this open source project: github.com/biobeats/swiftui-navigation-stack It's an alternative navigation stack for SwiftUI and, among other things, it offers the possibility to push/pop programmatically. It would be great if you guys joined me in improving this project. – superpuccio Feb 4 at 15:19
  • @Andrea, you were able to solve it? Im still stuck over here – mohsin Jul 7 at 16:54
  • Here you can find the simplest answer with example 🙌: <br> stackoverflow.com/a/62863487/12534983 – Sapa.Tech Jul 12 at 16:25
79

This example uses the new environment var documented in the Beta 5 Release Notes, which was using a value property. It was changed in a later beta to use a wrappedValue property. This example is now current for the GM version. This exact same concept works to dismiss Modal views presented with the .sheet modifier.

import SwiftUI

struct DetailView: View {
    @Environment(\.presentationMode) var presentationMode: Binding<PresentationMode>
    var body: some View {
        Button(
            "Here is Detail View. Tap to go back.",
            action: { self.presentationMode.wrappedValue.dismiss() }
        )
    }
}

struct RootView: View {
    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            NavigationLink(destination: DetailView())
            { Text("I am Root. Tap for Detail View.") }
        }
    }
}

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        NavigationView {
            RootView()
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This is really good! I just wish it worked for the doubleColumn navigation too to let us see the sidebar of the split view, for times when the user starts an iPad in portrait mode. – MScottWaller Aug 8 '19 at 20:14
  • 1
    I think this should be the accepted answer. It's very clean and doesn't need any modification on the parent view. – Maetthu24 Oct 16 '19 at 7:20
  • 1
    This is a great iOS solution, which I know was the main aim of the OP. Sadly though, it doesn't appear to work for macOS navigation lists, where both the list & view are shown simultaneously. Any known approach for that? – TheNeil Dec 16 '19 at 17:05
  • How to call the RootView from button? – Oleksandr May 4 at 0:42
  • I think this is what you want: stackoverflow.com/questions/57334455/… – Chuck H May 4 at 17:48
41

SwiftUI Xcode Beta 5

First, declare the @Environment which has a dismiss method which you can use anywhere to dismiss the view.

import SwiftUI

struct GameView: View {
    
    @Environment(\.presentationMode) var presentation
    
    var body: some View {
        Button("Done") {
            self.presentation.wrappedValue.dismiss()
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Awesome; simplest solution. Should be at the top. – Techy Ty Mar 3 at 4:47
  • 1
    Thanks, Techy Ty. Happy Coding :) – Prashant Gaikwad Mar 3 at 9:39
  • Works on iOS 13, Swift 5. Nice simple solution! – user3069232 May 4 at 9:59
  • Doesn't seem to work on Xcode 12 (release) – Ixx Sep 21 at 13:05
  • It's working fine. I checked on Xcode 12.0 – Prashant Gaikwad Sep 22 at 17:52
14

There is now a way to programmatically pop in a NavigationView, if you would like. This is in beta 5. Notice that you don't need the back button. You could programmatically trigger the showSelf property in the DetailView any way you like. And you don't have to display the "Push" text in the master. That could be an EmptyView(), thereby creating an invisible segue.

import SwiftUI

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        NavigationView {
            MasterView()
        }
    }
}

struct MasterView: View {
    @State private var showDetail = false

    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            NavigationLink(destination: DetailView(showSelf: $showDetail), isActive: $showDetail) {
                Text("Push")
            }
        }
    }
}

struct DetailView: View {
    @Binding var showSelf: Bool

    var body: some View {
        Button(action: {
            self.showSelf = false
        }) {
            Text("Pop")
        }
    }
}

#if DEBUG
struct ContentView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        ContentView()
    }
}
#endif
| improve this answer | |
  • This is causing errors for me if I press the back button from the detailView's navigation view instead of pressing the 'pop' button. Any ideas how to fix? – MobileMon Aug 19 '19 at 13:35
  • In cases where you use this method you'll want to hide the back button so that it doesn't interfere with your programmatic way of popping the view. Not really a fix, but definitely a way to avoid the issue. – MScottWaller Aug 19 '19 at 18:39
  • I'm hoping beta 6 fixes the issue – MobileMon Aug 19 '19 at 18:48
  • To add this great answer, if you are using the tag: , selection: initialization instead of the isActive: one, you can also pass this selection as a binding variable and set it to nil (or some value other than your tag) to pop the view. – AlexMath Jul 8 at 17:45
  • Addendum to my comment. This was a huge lesson for me: to be able to pop 2 or more, you need to add .isDetailLink(false) to the root navigation link. Otherwise the selection gets set to nil automatically when the 3rd view in the stack appears. – AlexMath Jul 8 at 20:43
5

I recently created an open source project called swiftui-navigation-stack (https://github.com/biobeats/swiftui-navigation-stack) that contains the NavigationStackView, an alternative navigation stack for SwiftUI. It offers several features described in the readme of the repo. For example, you can easily push and pop views programmatically. I'll show you how to do that with a simple example:

First of all embed your hierarchy in a NavigationStackVew:

struct RootView: View {
    var body: some View {
        NavigationStackView {
            View1()
        }
    }
}

NavigationStackView gives your hierarchy access to a useful environment object called NavigationStack. You can use it to, for instance, pop views programmatically as asked in the question above:

struct View1: View {
    var body: some View {
        ZStack {
            Color.yellow.edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)
            VStack {
                Text("VIEW 1")
                Spacer()

                PushView(destination: View2()) {
                    Text("PUSH TO VIEW 2")
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

struct View2: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var navStack: NavigationStack
    var body: some View {
        ZStack {
            Color.green.edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)
            VStack {
                Text("VIEW 2")
                Spacer()

                Button(action: {
                    self.navStack.pop()
                }, label: {
                    Text("PROGRAMMATICALLY POP TO VIEW 1")
                })
            }
        }
    }
}

In this example I use the PushView to trigger the push navigation with a tap. Then, in the View2 I use the environment object to programmatically come back.

Here is the complete example:

import SwiftUI
import NavigationStack

struct RootView: View {
    var body: some View {
        NavigationStackView {
            View1()
        }
    }
}

struct View1: View {
    var body: some View {
        ZStack {
            Color.yellow.edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)
            VStack {
                Text("VIEW 1")
                Spacer()

                PushView(destination: View2()) {
                    Text("PUSH TO VIEW 2")
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

struct View2: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var navStack: NavigationStack
    var body: some View {
        ZStack {
            Color.green.edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)
            VStack {
                Text("VIEW 2")
                Spacer()

                Button(action: {
                    self.navStack.pop()
                }, label: {
                    Text("PROGRAMMATICALLY POP TO VIEW 1")
                })
            }
        }
    }
}

struct ContentView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        RootView()
    }
}

the result is:

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Just tried this out and it is fantastic, it is so much more reliable than the built in SwiftUI stack. I am recursively pushing up to 20 copies of a screen on to the stack and the inbuilt one is getting confused, your NavigationStack handles it perfectly. – Brett Mar 1 at 23:29
2

You can try using a custom view and a Transition.

Here's a custom modal.

struct ModalView<Content>: View where Content: View {

    @Binding var isShowing: Bool
    var content: () -> Content

    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            ZStack(alignment: .center) {
                if (!self.isShowing) {
                    self.content()
                }
                if (self.isShowing) {
                    self.content()
                        .disabled(true)
                        .blur(radius: 3)

                    VStack {
                        Text("Modal")
                    }
                    .frame(width: geometry.size.width / 2,
                           height: geometry.size.height / 5)
                    .background(Color.secondary.colorInvert())
                    .foregroundColor(Color.primary)
                    .cornerRadius(20)
                    .transition(.moveAndFade) // associated transition to the modal view
                }
            }
        }
    }

}

I reused the Transition.moveAndFade from the Animation Views and Transition tutorial.

It is defined like this:

extension AnyTransition {
    static var moveAndFade: AnyTransition {
        let insertion = AnyTransition.move(edge: .trailing)
            .combined(with: .opacity)
        let removal = AnyTransition.scale()
            .combined(with: .opacity)
        return .asymmetric(insertion: insertion, removal: removal)
    }
}

You can test it - in the simulator, not in the preview - like this:

struct ContentView: View {

    @State var isShowingModal: Bool = false

    func toggleModal() {
        DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 3) {
            withAnimation {
                self.isShowingModal = true
            }
            DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 3) {
                withAnimation {
                    self.isShowingModal = false
                }
            }
        }
    }

    var body: some View {
        ModalView(isShowing: $isShowingModal) {
            NavigationView {
                List(["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"].identified(by: \.self)) { row in
                    Text(row)
                }.navigationBarTitle(Text("A List"), displayMode: .large)
            }.onAppear { self.toggleModal() }
        }
    }

}

Thanks to that transition, you will see the modal sliding in from the trailing edge, and the it will zoom and fade out when it is dismissed.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks Matteo, I will try this as soon as possible, this could be a cool temporary workaround hoping apple will introduce dismiss and pop – Andrea Miotto Jun 9 '19 at 10:26
1

Alternatively, if you don't want to do it programatically from a button, you can emit from the view model whenever you need to pop. Subscribe to a @Published that changes the value whenever the saving is done.

struct ContentView: View {
    @ObservedObject var viewModel: ContentViewModel
    @Environment(\.presentationMode) var presentationMode

    init(viewModel: ContentViewModel) {
        self.viewModel = viewModel
    }

    var body: some View {
        Form {
            TextField("Name", text: $viewModel.name)
                .textContentType(.name)
        }
        .onAppear {
            self.viewModel.cancellable = self.viewModel
                .$saved
                .sink(receiveValue: { saved in
                    guard saved else { return }
                    self.presentationMode.wrappedValue.dismiss()
                }
            )
        }
    }
}

class ContentViewModel: ObservableObject {
    @Published var saved = false // This can store any value.
    @Published var name = ""
    var cancellable: AnyCancellable? // You can use a cancellable set if you have multiple observers.

    func onSave() {
        // Do the save.

        // Emit the new value.
        saved = true
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Please check Following Code it's so simple.

FirstView

struct StartUpVC: View {
@State var selection: Int? = nil

var body: some View {
    NavigationView{
        NavigationLink(destination: LoginView().hiddenNavigationBarStyle(), tag: 1, selection: $selection) {
            Button(action: {
                print("Signup tapped")
                self.selection = 1
            }) {
                HStack {
                    Spacer()
                    Text("Sign up")
                    Spacer()
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

SecondView

struct LoginView: View {
@Environment(\.presentationMode) var presentationMode
    
var body: some View {
    NavigationView{
        Button(action: {
           print("Login tapped")
           self.presentationMode.wrappedValue.dismiss()
        }) {
           HStack {
              Image("Back")
              .resizable()
              .frame(width: 20, height: 20)
              .padding(.leading, 20)
           }
        }
      }
   }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This is the best answer now, but note instead of using presentationMode, you can just pass in an environment object that watches selection, and set selection to nil from any subsequent child view to go back to root view. – Super Noob Sep 7 at 5:45
0

The core concept of SwiftUI is to watch over the data flow.

You have to use a @State variable and mutate the value of this variable to control popping and dismissal.

struct MyView: View {
    @State
    var showsUp = false

    var body: some View {
        Button(action: { self.showsUp.toggle() }) {
            Text("Pop")
        }
        .presentation(
            showsUp ? Modal(
                Button(action: { self.showsUp.toggle() }) {
                    Text("Dismiss")
                }
            ) : nil
        )
    }
}

| improve this answer | |
  • What if the user close the modal swiping down? the state stays in a wrong state. And there is not a way to add a listener to the swipe down gesture. I''m pretty sure the will extends this pop/dismiss features with the next releases – Andrea Miotto Jun 16 '19 at 15:54
  • Try onDisappear(_:) ? – WeZZard Jun 18 '19 at 1:23
0

I experienced a compiler issue trying to call value on the presentationMode binding. Changing the property to wrappedValue fixed the issue for me. I'm assuming value -> wrappedValue is a language update. I think this note would be more appropriate as a comment on Chuck H's answer but don't have enough rep points to comment, I also suggested this change as and edit but my edit was rejected as being more appropriate as a comment or answer.

| improve this answer | |

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