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I'm working through Swift apprentice 3rd Edition.

The book quickly skips through required initialisers.

If I have a super class :

class Animal {
    let animalType: String

    required init(animalType: String) {
        self.animalType = animalType
    }

    convenience init(animal: Animal) {
        self.init(animalType: animal.animalType)
    }
}

and then subclass like:

class WildAnimal: Animal {
    let name: String

    required init(animalType: String) {
        name = ""
        super.init(animalType: animalType)
    }
}

The only way I can initialise the subclass is to assign placeholder values in the required init. i.e. I had to put name = "".

Is there no way to initialise a subclasses parameters during initialisation if the parent class has a required init?

4
  • "Is there no way to initialise a subclasses [members] during initialisation if the parent class has a required init?" I don't understand your question, isn't name = "" exactly initializing a subclass' members?
    – Alexander
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:21
  • no I don’t think it does. If I create an instance of WildAnimal then I cannot initialise that instance with a value for name. The place holder value is used. Sure I can change it later, but that brings the question when would I use a required init unless it was a subclass declared as final
    – hoboBob
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:25
  • @hoboBob remove the required requirement from the superclass initializer and add the name parameter also to the subclass initializer. Try something like class Animal { let animalType: String init(animalType: String) { self.animalType = animalType } } class WildAnimal: Animal { let name: String init(animalType: String, name: String) { self.name = name super.init(animalType: animalType) } }
    – Leo Dabus
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:35
  • @hoboBob I see what you mean.
    – Alexander
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:42
1

You can have more than one initializer. You just also have to "override" the required parent initializers.

class WildAnimal: Animal {
    var name: String

    required init(animalType: String) {
        name = ""
        super.init(animalType: animalType)
    }

    init(animalType: String, name: String) {
        self.name = name
        super.init(animalType: animalType)
    }
}

Forcing subclasses to define de required initializers is the point of required.

Write the required modifier before the definition of a class initializer to indicate that every subclass of the class must implement that initializer

Source

4
  • Hi Marco, thanks for the answer. With out going off topic can you think of any case uses for using a required init?
    – hoboBob
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:38
  • @hoboBob Imagine you had a protocol that required an initializer. For example, AnimatalTypeInitializable, which required an init(animalType: AnimalType). This protocol's requirements can easily be satisfied by any struct or enum, but with classes, you have subclassing to worry about. If a subclass were allowed to declare its own initializer into(somethingUnrelated:), then init(animalType: AnimalType) would no longer be available, and the subclass would be violating the protocol's requirements...
    – Alexander
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:44
  • ... To remedy this, the required keyword was designed, which requires subclasses to at least keep that initializer. They can add on any number of other initializers to their heart's content, but they guarantee that they at least won't break the conformance to the superclass's protocols.
    – Alexander
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:45
  • Thanks, I never though about that :) The book I'm reading never gave a use for it. Until I read your comment all I could make out was that adding a required init just made the class very ridged and less usable within OOP. You've answered my Q
    – hoboBob
    Jun 9 '19 at 16:50

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