1

I want to ask about the sort generic class I created. I used a lot of different concepts I learned this year and combined it into a nice class which I can use to sort anything (granted that if its a class the class has a CompareTo method)

public class Sort<T> where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        private List<T> toSort;
        public Sort(List<T> sortList)
        {
            toSort = sortList;
            quickSort();
        }
        public void quickSort()
        {
            qSort(toSort, 0, toSort.Count - 1);
        }
        private void qSort(List<T> toSort, int left, int right)
        {
            //set the indexes
            int leftIndex = left;
            int rightIndex = right;

            //get the pivot
            var pivot = toSort[left + (right - left) / 2];
            while (leftIndex <= rightIndex)
            {
                //check left values
                while (toSort[leftIndex].CompareTo(pivot)<0)
                {
                    leftIndex++;
                }
                //check right values
                while (toSort[rightIndex].CompareTo(pivot) >0)
                {
                    rightIndex--;
                }
                //swap
                if (leftIndex <= rightIndex)
                {
                    var tmp = toSort[leftIndex];
                    toSort[leftIndex] = toSort[rightIndex];
                    toSort[rightIndex] = tmp;

                    //move towards pivot
                    leftIndex++;
                    rightIndex--;
                }
            }
            //continues to sort left and right of pivot
            if (left < rightIndex)
            {
                qSort(toSort, left, rightIndex);
            }
            if (leftIndex < right)
            {
                qSort(toSort, leftIndex, right);
            }
        }


    }

I just have one question, the quickSort I used I got on the internet and then converted it to use generics by myself. I understand how the actual sorting works. I just want to know, why don't I have to return something. I am a bit confused. I see it is actually switching the values of the lists, but I wonder how it accesses the list I sent. Because where I call it I can just do this

List<string> toSort = new List<string> { "C", "B", "A" };
                Sort<string> sort = new Sort<string>(toSort);
                cbxAlphabet.DataSource = toSort;

So I just use the original list and it will have A, B and C in the comboBox.

If anybody can explain this I would really appreciate it!

EDIT:

 public static class Sort<T> where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        public static void quickSort(List<T> sortList)
        {
            qSort(sortList, 0, sortList.Count - 1);
        }
        private static void qSort(List<T> toSort, int left, int right)
        {
            //set the indexes
            int leftIndex = left;
            int rightIndex = right;

            //get the pivot
            var pivot = toSort[left + (right - left) / 2];
            while (leftIndex <= rightIndex)
            {
                //check left values
                while (toSort[leftIndex].CompareTo(pivot)<0)
                {
                    leftIndex++;
                }
                //check right values
                while (toSort[rightIndex].CompareTo(pivot) >0)
                {
                    rightIndex--;
                }
                //swap
                if (leftIndex <= rightIndex)
                {
                    var tmp = toSort[leftIndex];
                    toSort[leftIndex] = toSort[rightIndex];
                    toSort[rightIndex] = tmp;

                    //move towards pivot
                    leftIndex++;
                    rightIndex--;
                }
            }
            //continues to sort left and right of pivot
            if (left < rightIndex)
            {
                qSort(toSort, left, rightIndex);
            }
            if (leftIndex < right)
            {
                qSort(toSort, leftIndex, right);
            }
        }


    }
  • 1
    A List<T> is a reference type. Since the Sort<T> class just maintains a reference to the list instead of copying it, the contents in the original list are modified by the class. – itsme86 Jun 10 at 14:41
5

It is because List<T> is a Reference Type.

There are two kinds of types in C#: reference types and value types. Variables of reference types store references to their data (objects), while variables of value types directly contain their data. With reference types, two variables can reference the same object; therefore, operations on one variable can affect the object referenced by the other variable. With value types, each variable has its own copy of the data, and it is not possible for operations on one variable to affect the other (except in the case of in, ref and out parameter variables; see in, ref and out parameter modifier).

In your example, the variable toSort and the private field Sort.toSort both reference the exact same list.

  • 1
    Guys this makes so much sense, I didn't think to look at it with the reference vs value types and it's all I've been hearing for years. That makes perfect sense. Thank you so much. – Sparky532 Jun 10 at 14:45
1

If you manipulate a collection passed as parameter, that will be manipulated for every class able to access the same instance of the collection, this is why you don't really need to return a new lost.

To learn more about reference and value types please read: Value Types Reference Types

If you want to take a look at how the .net framework helps you out with the sorting of collections, please read here

0

You have a class constructor that expects the list as the parameter, and it's sorting that list.

Basically this code:

private List<T> toSort;
public Sort(List<T> sortList)
{
    toSort = sortList;
    quickSort();
}

Now, List<T> is a reference type, which means that if you pass it on as a parameter to some other code that modifies it, the calling code will see the modified list.

-1

The reason this works is because you are doing in-place sorting. No copy of the list is made and all changes are made on the original list you passed by Reference Type. The same thing works on arrays and any other pass by Reference Type.

If I might make a suggestion to make your code a little faster and cleaner is to use generic static methods, like so:

public static class SortMethods
{
    public static <T> List<T> QuickSort(this List<T> toSort) where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        QuickSort(toSort, 0, toSort.Count - 1);
        return toSort;
    }
    private static <T> void QuickSort(this List<T> toSort, int left, int right) where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        // perform quick sort
    }
}

Then you can call this one of two ways:

  • list.QuickSort();
  • SortMethods.QuickSort(list);
  • No parameters are passed by reference in the entire program. – Servy Jun 10 at 14:51
  • @Servy - Not explicitly passed by reference, but yes they are. please refer to Joshua Robinson's answer. – James Wasson Jun 10 at 14:54
  • Thank you so much for the suggestion, I originally had it like that (so I feel rather proud about that). I like the idea to be able to do the quick sort no matter the type the original idea was to just do it for strings, but then I thought bigger. The reason I changed it was to tick off a few requirement for my project, 1. Sorting of data, use of IComparable, 2. Use of generic classes and 3. recursion. So this then ticks of all three without too much trouble. I did now change it to be static however check out my edit. – Sparky532 Jun 10 at 14:55
  • Also, my lecturer suggested using our priority queue with a max and min heap example but everyone will do that and I wanted to do something unique – Sparky532 Jun 10 at 14:57
  • 1
    @JamesWasson The parameter is only passed by reference if there's a ref, out, or in keyword when defining it or calling it. The parameter is passed by value due to the fact that none of those keywords are there. Joshua's answer states that the type is a reference type, not that the parameter is passed by reference. Those are completely different things, and only one of them is true. – Servy Jun 10 at 15:23

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