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I was solving a problem and the basic idea to calculate the power of 2 for some k. And then multiply it with 10. Result should be calculated value mod 10^9+7.

Given Constraints 1≤K≤10^9

I am using java language for this. I used 'Math.pow' function but 2^10000000 exceeds its range and I don't want to use 'BigInteger' here. Any other way to calculate such large values.

The actual problem is:

For each valid i, the sign with number i had the integer i written on one side and 10K−i−1 written on the other side.

Now, Marichka is wondering — how many road signs have exactly two distinct decimal digits written on them (on both sides in total)? Since this number may be large, compute it modulo 10^9+7.

I'm using this pow approach, but this is not an efficient way. Any suggestion to solve this problem.

My original Solution:

/* package codechef; // don't place package name! */

import java.util.*;
class Codechef
{
 public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception
{
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
    int t = scan.nextInt();
    while(t-->0){
        long k = scan.nextInt();
        long mul=10*(long)Math.pow(2, k-1);
        long ans = mul%1000000007;

        System.out.println(ans);
    }
  }
}

After taking some example, I reached that this pow solution works fine for small constraints but not for large.

while(t-->0){
        long k = scan.nextInt();
        long mul=10*(long)Math.pow(2, k);
        long ans = mul%1000000007;

        System.out.println(ans);
    }

This pow function is exceeding its range. Any good solution to this.

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  • 1
    Only a small hint, since I'm just figuring out how to use that fact myself: 10 ^ 9 + 7 is prime. – Paul Jun 11 '19 at 9:43
5

Basically, f(g(x)) mod M is the same as f(g(x) mod M) mod M. As exponentiation is just a lot of multiplication, you can just decompose your single exponentiation into many multiplications, and apply modulo at every step. i.e.

10 * 2^5 mod 13

is the same as

10
* 2 mod 13
* 2 mod 13
* 2 mod 13
* 2 mod 13
* 2 mod 13

You can compact the loop by not breaking up the exponentiation so far; i.e. this would give the same answer, again:

10
* 4 mod 13
* 4 mod 13
* 2 mod 13

Faruk's recursive solution shows an elegant way to do this.

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  • Your example 10 * 2^5 mod 1000000007, well, of course that's the same, as the result 320 is still much lower than 1000000007. (Not saying that it's not true in the general case, but the example is pretty bad) – tobias_k Jun 11 '19 at 9:12
  • @tobias_k: True, I should have used a lower M (I really don't want to unroll a loop that would overflow 1000000007 :D ) – Amadan Jun 11 '19 at 9:14
  • what? Since when is f(g(x)) mod M == f(g(x) mod M) mod M. It is not even true for exponentiation. We have a^b mod M != a^(b mod M) mod M – Andreas H. Jun 11 '19 at 10:38
  • @AndreasH. I oversimplified; but it does hold for the operation OP needs ((a*b) mod M == (a mod M)*(b mod M) mod M) – Amadan Jun 11 '19 at 10:44
  • in the first example 10* 2 mod 13 = 10*2 and after 5 loops its 32*10. What is shorten here. nothing – Nitin Singhal Jun 11 '19 at 12:55
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You need to use the idea of dividing the power by 2.

long bigmod(long p,long e,long M) {
    if(e==0)
        return 1;
    if(e%2==0) {
        long t=bigmod(p,e/2,M);
        return (t*t)%M;
    }
    return (bigmod(p,e-1,M)*p)%M;
}

while(t-->0){
        long k = scan.nextInt();
        long ans = bigmod(2, k, 1000000007);
        System.out.println(ans);
    }

You can get details about the idea from here: https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/how-to-avoid-overflow-in-modular-multiplication/

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  • I was thinking it should be possible to compact the loop a bit, but couldn't write it elegantly from head. My answer explains the basics, but this answer would be actually used in production. Very nice. – Amadan Jun 11 '19 at 9:16
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    Java doesn't have a long long type. Java int is a signed 32-bit type, a long is a signed 64-bit type. – President James K. Polk Jun 11 '19 at 18:40
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As the size of long is 8 bytes and it is signed datatype so the range of long datatype is -(2^63) to (2^63 - 1). Hence to store 2^100 you have to use another datatype.

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